New release from TEGEL – Techno & Noise join forces on Desolation in forlorn districts


TEGEL released their highly acclaimed debut in late 2017 and now Scandinavia’s connoisseurs of minimal techno and experimental sound are back with a new album dubbed Desolation in forlorn districts.

The new album – Desolation in forlorn districts – blends influences from Ellen Allien, Plastikman, Nina Kraviz and many more to provide you with a full length listening experience. The album is set out in two chapters; Part 1 dives right into the roots of contemporary techno while Part 2 goes deeper into everything glitch, noise and ambiance with heavy beat drops that manifests all that TEGEL stands for – experimental experiences.

TEGEL says in a comment: “By creating a part 1 and 2 we could emphasise on the sonic journey we wanted to take the listener on. In part 1 we continue from where we left off with our last album Science, and with part 2 we can also show another side of TEGEL that is all about sonic experiences – we are die hard fans of creating experimental electronic music.”

The tracks have one thing in common – that they explore remote or abandoned places on earth be it Longyearbyen or odd sites on our planet that ones hold great dreams for people but are now long forgotten, sometimes unpleasant, sometimes intriguingly fascinating. They invite you to listen in to TEGEL’s journey across our planet.

TEGEL mentions in a comment: “There is something very inviting with abandoned places. Across the earth there are so many places that once thrived and where people had hopes for a better future and suddenly they are all left to die. We tried to give these forgotten places a sonic experiences – kind of what it would be like revisiting them, sometimes pleasant sometimes rough.”


The new album is the successor to the highly acclaimed debut “Science” released in 2017, but now with far more rich sonic endeavours on their pallett. 

AVAILABILITY:
Desolation in forlorn districts can be accessed through most online platforms:
Spotify:https://open.spotify.com/album/1FG1pIirNwyWh3vVU5hBYs?si=wdK8MtS4S8S59E87qSg2Ww
Bandcamp:http://tegel.bandcamp.com/album/desolation-in-forlorn-districts
Apple Music:https://music.apple.com/se/album/desolation-in-forlorn-districts-pt-1-2/1521491778

Noise, rhythms and voices are everywhere – they surround us and reach our ears as waves from past and present. These sounds are captured, in field recordings, or crafted by us, in memory of the sonic landscape we are all part of. Audio and music are in essence part of our modern day urban society consciously or unconsciously, and these sonic wave forms paint the feelings of individuals and modes of societies put in a universal perspective.

TEGEL explores the sonic experiences in everyday modern situations, both from a scientific and a human standpoint – examining how they came to be an essential pulse and rhythm in urban life. The works of industry and machines are instrumental in shaping these metropolitan worlds inhabited by faceless masses. Millions of people in endless pursuit of happiness, while performing monotone daily tasks. At night time though, things change and the sounds of the urban society morphs into the world of TEGEL. With heavy minimal techno beats, captivating bass rhythms, and ambient soundscapes – inspired by the urban underground society, TEGEL delivers dark techno tracks with scientific precision. This is the role of the anonymous operators behind TEGEL – to colorize the hidden emotions and aspirations of the masses of mega-societies across the globe.

On their previous album, Science, TEGEL incorporated the aspect of the different forces in nature that, at the end of the day, shape our daily lives. In essence, just like the waveforms generated by industry and machines, the force fields that surround us are also integral parts of the inter-twined fabric we all share. Even the Universe has a voice, one that was captured by LIGO* and re-used by TEGEL as a tribute to the forces that, just like music, defines human life as we know it.

Foto credit: Petter Duvander