Taking a tour on the KORG Polysix

September 28, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized 

The synthesizer’s main features are six-voice polyphony (with unison and chord memory voice assignment modes), 32 memory slots for patches and cassette port for backing up patches, and an arpeggiator. On its release it was, along with the Roland Juno 6 which was released around the same time, one of the first times a polyphonic analog synthesizer was available at a cost effective price ‘for the masses’. It cost about twice as much as the competing Juno 6 but had far more features and ‘real’ VCOs in place of the Juno’s DCOs. It also had on-board patch storage and back up which the cheaper Juno lacked until the upgraded Juno 60 model.

Korg developed the Polysix with an eye on the Sequential Circuits Prophet 5, trying to provide some of the features found on the more expensive synth in a compact, reliable and much cheaper design. While not as powerful, it used SSM2044 4-pole voltage-controlled, giving the Polysix a warm, rounded and organic sound. Although the Polysix only had one oscillator per voice, it also featured built in chorus, phaser and ‘ensemble’ effects (using a ‘bucket brigade’ analog delay line design), to provide a fuller sound.

Vintage synthesizer demo track by RetroSound
“Primabella”

all synthesizer sounds: KORG Polysix analog synthesizer (1982)
I use the internal arpeggiator for the bassline. The P-6 bass is in unisono mode.
drums: LinnDrum
recording: multi-tracking without midi
fx: a bit reverb and delay

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