Wheel Ring

September 21, 2011 · Posted in Uncategorized 

Gear used:

Wiard AO Uncle
Toppobrillo Quantimator TWF
Make Noise René Brains PP Wogglebug QMMG Math
4ms Noise Swash RCD
Analogue systems RS 110
Doepfer A 117
A 134 cv from Moog MP 201

Featured hardware – RS 110:

The RS110 consists of a two channel audio mixer followed by four, parallel, resonant filters with voltage controlled frequency and a unique “insert” point in the feedback path that generates and controls resonance.

Filter Modes

The RS110 offers four filter modes. These are 24dB/oct low-pass, 24dB/oct high-pass, 12dB/oct band-pass and 12dB/oct band reject (often called ‘notch’) filtering, with the cutoff frequencies (Fc) of the high-pass and low-pass outputs being the centre frequencies of the band-pass and notch outputs. Each of these filter characteristics is described in appendix 2.

There is no switch to select between the modes because all four are available simultaneously from the appropriate output sockets. However, the cut-off and resonance can not be defined individually for each, and the controls act upon each mode equally

Cutoff Frequency

You can control the cut-off frequency manually using the FREQUENCY control. In its fully anticlockwise position, Fc is approximately 30Hz. As you rotate the knob clockwise Fc will increase until, it its fully clockwise position, it exceeds 15kHz. These extreme positions are called ‘closed’ and ‘open’ respectively. You may also control Fc using one or both of the CV inputs:

If you apply a CV conforming to the 1V/oct standard, Fc will track the CV in exactly the same way as an RS90 VCO would if you applied the same CV to its CV-IN 1V/OCT socket. If the CV is supplied from a keyboard then, in common parlance, the filter is tracking the keyboard 100% and, with the resonance at maximum, you can ‘play’ the filter as if it were a conventional oscillator. You can also use this facility to make a notch or band-pass filter “track” the notes you are playing, and this can be used to create many special effects.

You may wish Fc to track incoming CVs differently, so the CV-IN VARY input is provided. This socket and its associated LEVEL control allow you to specify the filter’s sensitivity to CVs within the range ×V/oct to approximately 0.4V/oct. The former of these makes the filter invariant to incoming CVs, while the latter makes it over-sensitive compared to CV-IN.

You can determine Fc in the range 3Hz to 50kHz using combinations of the frequency control knob and the voltage control inputs.

Resonance

The filters have a common resonance, ‘Q’, that you can control using the RESONANCE knob. In its fully anticlockwise position, Q is approximately zero, and there is no emphasis of the signal at Fc. As you rotate the knob clockwise Q will increase, whereupon every mode of the RS110 will accentuate the harmonics that lie close to the cut-off frequency, Fc. Increasing Q further, the filters will exhibit ringing, and will severely colour any signals passed through them. Finally, if you continue to increase the resonance beyond a certain point, the filter will itself begin to oscillate, even in the absence of an input. Each mode will now produce a stable tone at the cutoff frequency determined by the various controls. This oscillation takes the form of (approximately) a sine wave, and it is produced by all four of the conventional audio outputs. The exact nature of the wave varies slightly from mode to mode, and you can use these subtle differences to create tonal variation when using the RS110 as an oscillator.

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