Broken Wave and Moog Funk

October 20, 2014 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Headphones highly recomended
An afternoon improvisation.
Gear used: Waldorf Blofeld and MicroQ, Arturia Microbrute through Eventide H9, Elektron Machinedrum, Akai mpc500 as main sequencer, Korg Ms2000, Clavia Nord Modular G2 and DSI Tetr4. Hardwire DL7 and RV8 were used on the Tetra.

A funky moog jam. Drums are 100% Tempest, I also added a moog bass line, some rhodes sounds off the nord, and a clav type patch off the prophet 08. The main moog lead is going through an MXR carbon copy.

Amazing machines: Moog Sub37 & DSI Pro2

October 19, 2014 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

The Moog Sub37 & DSI Pro2 together with the GrooveAgent (Cubase)
I don’t wanted to show wich one is better – but how good they play together ;-)
this was a special wish from someone of the german forum for better comparing the two…

Checking out the Memorymoog

October 18, 2014 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

The Memorymoog from 1982 is a fantastic sounding polyphonic vintage synthesizer. A true piece of art. This track is created with Memorymoog sounds only by Mr Firechild www.firechild.se

50th Anniversary of the Moog Modular Synthesizer

October 12, 2014 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

October 12, 2014 marks the 50 Year anniversary of the unveiling of the Moog modular synthesizer at the Audio Engineering Society’s (AES) New York convention. On that day in 1964, Dr. Robert Moog introduced the world to a completely new type of instrument that would go on to change the course of music history and influence decades of future instrument design. Told by a Moog engineer, Moog Historian, and Bob Moog himself, this mini-documentary explores Moog Music’s quest to resurrect the original methods, materials and designs used in the foundational modular synths. Through recreating Keith Emerson’s modular system, Moog Music rediscovers the power, elegance, and enduring legacy of its first instruments.

Find out more at www.moogmusic.com

Exploring the Moog Sonic 6

October 2, 2014 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Tom demonstrating his new (old) Moog Sonic 6

The Sonic Six is an interesting, although obscure synthesizer from the Moog history books. Its predecessor, the Sonic V, was designed by an ex-Moog employee for the muSonics brand. When muSonics eventually bought out R.A. Moog, forming Moog muSonics, the Sonic V’s basic design was moved into a portable brief-case style synthesizer, and with only a few tweaks, the Sonic Six was born.

The fact that the Sonic Six originated from another company’s design not only accounts for why the Sonic Six looks different than any other Moog, but also for some pretty unique differences under the hood as well. To start, it is duo-phonic, utilizing two analog oscillators with three basic waveforms each plus tuning, modulation and scaling controls. There are two independent LFO generators with advanced control options not seen on other Moog synths (for instance, an X/Y knob is used to mix and balance the LFO outputs). Also on-board is a Ring Modulator (that can modulate either Osc. B or external audio) and pink/white noise generators.

Moog synthesizers are known for their filters, and the Sonic Six strays from the usual Moog in this area as well. While it is known that ARP stole a filter design from Moog for use in some of their 2600 and Odyssey models, leading to lawsuits between Moog and ARP, according to Mark Vail in “Vintage Synthesizers,” the Sonic Six actually used some circuitry in its filters which were stolen from an ARP design, although ARP never sued Moog over it. However, later models of the Sonic Six were eventually fitted with a more traditional Moog designed filter. In either case, the filter is a low-pass 24dB/oct which offers the usual controls and is capable of self-oscillation. The VCA, however, has a rather limited set of controls – attack and decay plus a sustain on/off switch.

Not commonly seen, they are actually rather durable devices and used ones generally (if proper care was taken of them) are found in good working order. It was originally designed for educational and home use so it is light and portable and even has a built-in amplifier and speaker. It’s a genuine Moog synth that is equally as obscure as useful these days. And its rather simple looking front-panel layout hides the uniquely flexible, powerful and great sounding little beast it truly is!

Oskar Novak Moog synthesizer demonstration

September 29, 2014 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Oskar Novak demonstrates his Moog XL and Moog Subphatty synthesizers and plays original compositions utilizing these two amazing instruments. He begins playing at 43 seconds.

Hands-On Review: Moog Sub 37 Analog Synthesizer

September 18, 2014 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Moog’s new analog synthesizer sounds terrific and features a lot of hands on controls for easy sound tweaking during performance. In addition to monophonic sounds, it’s duo mode allows you to play two notes at once. Also, it’s simple but powerful arpeggiator/sequencer, LFOs, and looping envelopes can all be locked to a master clock for exciting rhythm effects.

Anthony Rother : first contact with the new Moog Synthesizer SUB37

Listen to Moog Sub 37 Demos – Audio only

September 15, 2014 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

A few sounds from the Sub 37.
Additional effects: Valhalla Room, Valhalla VintageVerb, and u-he Satin.

Dreamcurrents on Moog Apollo – Erik Norlander – Live in Asheville

September 15, 2014 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

www.eriknorlander.com
www.thetank.com
www.bobmoogfoundation.org

Erik’s piano workout piece, “Dreamcurrents,” performed live on the rare Moog Apollo synthesizer and Minimoog Voyager at Isis Music Hall in Asheville, NC on May 8, 2014 along with Mark Matthews (b), Nick LePar (d) and Jeff Kollman (g) as part of the event, “A Tribute to Dr. Bob,” a fundraiser for Dr. Bob’s SoundSchool and The Bob Moog Foundation.

The Moog Apollo, Minimoog Model D and modular Moog system were restored and provided by the Bob Moog Foundation as part of their Archive Preservation Initiative.

DSI Mono Evolver Keyboard + Moog Sub 37 Synth + Korg Wavedrum

September 7, 2014 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Another work-in-progress demo of the Dave Smith Instruments Mono Evolver Keyboard, the Moog Sub 37 Tribute Edition synth, and the Korg Wavedrum Global Edition. Recorded into Ableton Live 9 Suite with additional Piano track played using the Ableton Push controller.

Video shot with the Fujifilm X-E1 camera. Edited in Final Cut Pro X. Atomic blast footage is from a public domain film found at the Prelinger Archive.

Audio only version of this song can be found at – https://soundcloud.com/genshi/untitle…

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