Circuit Bent Star Wars Technika FX

July 16, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Star Wars Technika – rehoused Star Wars sound FX keyring inside a Technika casing

switched 1/4inch jack output
white LED
4 red momentary buttons for each sound
toggle switch with rotary switch to select a sound to hold and loop
red latching button to select pitch on/off
pitch up/down control

MachFive 3 IRCAM granular synthesis

February 23, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

MOTU’s Matt LaPoint demonstrates MachFive 3’s IRCAM-based granular synthesis engine by applying simple, yet effective, granular techniques to the main Star Wars theme.

Off Topic: A NEW STAR WARS IS COMING IN 2015

October 31, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

OK, we know this is slightly off topic, but on the other hand hown many genuine synthesizer music fans out there are not also big fans of science fiction and space – so this had to be posted :-D

Disney just bought Lucasfilm for $4 billion. Announcing the news, Disney also said it will release a new Star Wars movie in 2015. The movie is currently titled Star Wars: Episode 7. That means it will take place after Return Of The Jedi.

From a press release: “Star Wars Episode 7 is targeted for release in 2015, with more feature films expected to continue the Star Wars saga and grow the franchise well into the future.” Traditionalists are going to scream in horror at this news, but there is a silver lining. The new films will not be produced by George Lucas – who lost his touch a long time ago. Disney executive Kathleen Kennedy will be executive producer of all new Star Wars films. Lucas will serve as a mere “creative consultant.”

“With the acquisition, Disney will acquire Lucasfilm’s live action production business, along with its Industrial Light & Magic effects business, its Skywalker Sound audio operation and its consumer products unit, among other things.”

Atari D2 Punk Synth / Sequencer by A.S.M.O.

August 7, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Nice to see R2D2 coming to real use here (I do have exactly the same droid figure at home, now I know what to do with it)

Stepped tone generator + 5 step sequencer housed in a Star Wars R2D2 bubble bath container.

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=280935731203&ssP…

http://asmo23.wordpress.com/2012/08/04/atari-d2-punk-synth/

Circuit Bent Star Wars – Arch Nemesis

July 29, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Star Wars – Arch Nemesis – Sound FX unit

A rehoused Star Wars Keyring.

switched mono mini jack output
blue LED
pitch up/down control – turn it down to enter the “Darkside”
switchable pitch down LDR – Use “The Force” to control this one
“Choose One” – Rotary switch – flick through each of the six voices/sound fx
Loop Skywalker Switch – this will loop each of the sound fx
Hands Solo – this will give you one shot playability of the sounds

.fd. online
Facebook – http://www.facebook.com/pages/freeform-delusion/144587583120
Twitter – http://twitter.com/#!/freeformd
eBay – http://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/freeform-delusion/m.html

The sounds of Star Wars

September 29, 2011 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

This is one of a series of podcasts exploring the ways sound and sound effects can be used to help bring stories to life.

Meet Ben Burtt, Sound Designer for films like Star Wars, Raiders of the Lost Ark and WALL-E. Learn how he comes up with sounds that complement the amazing things seen on the silver screen – from laser blasts to whirring, buzzing lightsabers. Find out the story behind some of his signature effects and how he first got interested in sound design.

CIRCUIT BENT Star Wars Darth Vader Voice Changer & Casio SK-1

April 25, 2011 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Continuing the space theme from previous post :-)

The Vader voice changer was something that I’d started years ago but due to my inexperience, I ballsed it up. Now it’s all freshly spanked and fully awesome.
The unit contains 3 Vader samples:
‘What is your bidding, my master?’
‘Impressive’
and his asthmatic wheeze.
Also there’s the voice changing aspect.
It’s a bit weird, it does a pitch shift down, but not a full octave, with some slight modulation. It’s gritty and dirty and guaranteed to lead you down the path to the Darkside.

The mods are a bit limited. I’ve added a pitch dial for the samples, which when cranked high will result in a some glitching (although it wouldn’t do it for me when I shot the video) and an overdrive dial that affects both the sample and voice effects. There’s also a line in for the changer and a line-out for amplification, the speaker is still intact for on the fly sonic Sith noise terrorism and there’s 3 LEDs for added ambience.

Deceptikon – Broken Synthesizers

February 21, 2011 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

http://deceptikon.net • official Deceptikon music video for “Broken Synthesizers” from the album “Mythology of the Metropolis” out on vinyl now!

video by http://mikrosopht.godxiliary.com

Sure hope they do not get in trouble with George Lucas hehe

Brainwave controlled monotron

February 3, 2011 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Star wars :-)

This is a brainwave controlled synth i made for a mate for his birthday. The frequency of brainwaves is sent from the sensor digitally to the base station, all I have done is mod the monotron to have a cv/gate input and added a few components to the force trainer to output a voltage determined by the brain activity sensed.

Holographic TV

January 28, 2011 · Posted in Uncategorized · 1 Comment 

Slightly off topic, but since many of you enjoy sci-fi as much as we do :-)

The holographic device plays a 3-inch projection at 15 frames per second, just shy of movie refresh rates of 24 to 30 frames per second, the MIT researchers demonstrated at the Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers’ conference on practical holography.

The red hologram is jerkier and has much lower resolution than the one in Star Wars that sparked the public fascination with 3-D holograms in the 1970s. In fact, it kind of looks like a red blob on a staticky TV. But it’s 30 times faster than a telepresence device created in 2010 by University of Arizona researchers.

“I think it’s an important milestone because they were able to get to 15 frames per second, which is almost real time,” says physicist Nasser Peyghambarian, who led the Arizona research. “The quality is not as high, but hopefully it will get better in the future.”

The key to speed was computational power. The MIT team used a Kinect camera from an Xbox 360 gaming console to capture light from a moving object. Then they relayed the data over the Internet to a PC with three graphics processing units, or GPUs, tiny processors found in computers, cell phones, and video games that render video quickly. The processors compute how light waves interfere with each other to form patterns of light and dark fringes. Light bouncing off these fringe patterns reconstructs the original image. The MIT team used a display to illuminate the computer-generated fringes and create a hologram.

“The students were able to figure out how to generate holograms by using what GPU chips are good at,” says Michael Bove, an MIT engineer who led the research. “And they get faster every year. There’s room for a lot more understanding of how to compute holograms on them.”

Via W

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