Yamaha RX7 Drum Machine

July 9, 2014 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Quick play of the RX7, little brother of the RX5 and almost as good. First is some preset patterns and then all the sounds.

About RX7 and RX5:

Out of the eighties comes this hugely underrated drum machine—in 1986, the RX5 was Yamaha’s flagship drum machine. Although its vintage appeal may be diminished by the Roland R-8 (as well as the resurgence of the TR-808 and TR-909 machines), if you’re on a budget, this one could be for you.

The RX5 has many features that other drum machines simply do not have. Aside from all of the basics, such as pitch adjustment, level control, etc., this machine also features “Attack” and “Decay” envelope controls and two levels of “Accent” for each sound, allowing you to really change the character of any of its 24 built-in sounds. The sounds range from surprisingly real and punchy kicks and snares, to gunshots, door slams, even guitar and bass samples.

The RX5 features a RAM/ROM cartridge slot for storing custom edited sounds and loading in new sounds as well (adding an additional 28 sounds to the 24 built-in). Any sound can be assigned along the top row of pads (the bottom row are preset to the usual suspects—kick, snare, toms, hats, etc.), allowing you to customize your drum kit. Make an orchestra of handclaps, bass drums, or guitars! You can create and store up to three custom drum kits.

Another interesting feature of the RX5 is its pitch envelope. There are two simple parameters: “Bend Amount” and “Bend Rate”. With this feature, you can make any sound pitch-bend downwards or upwards, across several octaves. This effect can be stored as part of your custom edited sound at the touch of a few buttons.

Also overlooked but extremely useful are the “Reverse” and “Damp” functions. You can record a reverse crash cymbal at one point in a drum pattern, and switch back to a regular crash cymbal elsewhere in the same pattern. The “Damp” function emulates the dampening of a drum head or a cymbal choke. Many drum machines overlook these useful functions, which can really help add a touch more authenticity and nuance to your drum patterns.

The sequencer section can record up to 100 patterns with time signatures ranging from 01/32 to 99/2 in either Real Time or Step Time record modes. Real Time recorded patterns can be quantized to the nearest 1/2 to 1/48 note. Patterns can be arranged in up to 30 Songs. And Songs can be chained together to form complete performance sets. All sequence data can also be offloaded to external RAM cartridge or cassette tape interface.

It is also worth mentioning that the RX5 has a 12 channel mixer with stereo out plus 12 individual outputs. Along with full MIDI Implementation, it’s a snap to integrate into your studio. Use it as a stand-alone desktop drum machine, or hook it up to your MIDI keyboard or DAW system like a sound module for some serious drums! Sounds can be arranged for a MIDI keyboard however you please, and the RX5 will save the keyboard mapping—even if the sounds are coming from an external sound cartridge.

The RX5 was shipped by Yamaha with one additional cartridge of sounds—the “RX5 ROM”. Three additional Waveform ROM Cartridges were made to suit various genres: WRC-02 “Jazz/Fusion,” WRC-03 “Heavy Metal,” and WRC-04 “Effects.” There were also a few third-party cartridges made, containing TR-808 and TR-909 samples, but they are rather rare. If you’re looking for an RX5, try to find one with all the ROM cartridges, and maybe a “RAM4″ cartridge too, as they may come in handy.

Overall, a very unique and in-depth machine, capable of a huge variety of sounds. From the nostalgic sounds that defined 80′s drum beats, to rock, metal, and electronic music. Programming a beat may not be as easy as a Roland TR machine, but it’s still intuitive tap-based recording. You will have no problem finding a place for this beast in your studio.

“Shinto” – ethnic synth jam

July 7, 2014 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

New “ethnic” style composition using the Yamaha Motif-6 flute with delay and reverb as well as Motif-6 cymbals. Roland JV-880 is used for a classic analogue string patch and Roland D-50 patch “Juno clav” is used for the accompaniment.

Synths: Yamaha Motif 6 classic
Roland JV-1080 and JV-880
Roland S-10 sampler- midi controller for JV-880

Shock-HRz – Tactical Shadow [Access, Elektron, Korg, Yamaha & Akai Live Set]

June 16, 2014 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Shock-HRz, captures a live performance, Tactical Shadow

Technical details below. 

Simone Ciacci a.k.a. “Storm 3003″:

  • Access Virus TI
  • Elektron Analog Four
  • Korg Kaoss Pad 3
  • Korg Kaossilator Pro

Gabriele Marini a.k.a. “ReD”:

  • Akai Miniak
  • Yamaha RM1X
  • Korg Volca Bass

Francesco Salvatici a.k.a. “4TeK”:

  • Korg Electribe MX
  • Korg Mini-KP
  • Korg Monotron
  • Korg Monotron Duo

Yamaha MOXF 6 presentation

June 3, 2014 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Yamaha product specialist Dom Sigalas visited to show us the Yamaha MOXF6 workstation. With most of the brains of the flagship MOTIF its way more affordable.

How Do Synths Sound Through Crystalline?

May 1, 2014 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Vintage Yamaha PS-20 analog keyboard connected to iPad using Apogee Jam interface, played through Crystalline. Also features iOS apps Animoog, Audiobus and Arturia iSEM. No other effects or processing done.

Crystalline: Shimmer Effects Processor for iPad
http://crystallineapp.com

Yamaha TX802 Demo. “Electronic Machine”

April 2, 2014 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Here is a demo track of the Yamaha TX802 FM Synthesizer.
All sounds (including drums) are from the TX. The tune was recorded and mixed in Cubase, with effects added.

You can download a high quality audio file of this track here:
https://soundcloud.com/michael-119/ya…

Despite its name, the TX802 FM Tone Generator is basically a rack-module version of the DX7mkII with full 8-part multi-timbral operation for sequencing and/or key mapping. It has 16-voices of polyphony and six digital FM Operators, the same as in the DX7mkII. There are 128 preset and 64 user patches for your sounds, as well as an external memory cartridge slot.

As if the large keyboard DX versions weren’t difficult enough to program, the TX802′s limited interface makes editing and programming your own sounds next to impossible without the help of external hardware or software editors. In the late 1980′s, the TX802 was an excellent way to get a compact box full of Yamaha’s DX sounds.

Hawkeye – Analog Mind

March 11, 2014 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Background video information below:

An analog session with the Alesis Andromeda in four-voice unison mode, accompanied only by the Yamaha FS1R FM Synth and an Elektron Machinedrum for percussion and samples.

All pattern changes and filter actions are performed live, this would have been impossible without the incredible MIDIbox Sequencer. Many thanks to TK. for his work!

Filmed in Fuerteventura with a quadcopter and a GoPro Hero3.

Hope you enjoyed the flight :) – thanks for watching and listening!
Hawkeye/Maelstroem Records

YAMAHA DX7 DEMO – THIS AGE ELECTRIC

February 14, 2014 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

The Yamaha DX7 like few have ever heard it. Capable of much more than many realize. An amazing sonic spectrum that makes the composition of an entire track possible. As always 100% DX7 sounds.

Time machine: Yamaha CS-50 Analog Synthesizer

January 20, 2014 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

All sounds from the 1976 Yamaha CS-50 !
The Yamaha CS-50 is the baby brother to the mighty CS-80. Actually it has almost exactly the same Voice cards as the CS-80. However the baby brother has only 4 Voice cards where the CS-80 has 16 ! Also the CS-50 is lacking the velocity polyphonic aftertouch keyboard so even though the core sound is similar the CS-80 has a more organic and dynamic sound because of the better keyboard. The Kenton MIDI gives the CS-50 the ability to play with MIDI velocity for example controlling the filter depth. Unfortunately you can´t assign MIDI aftertouch to the CS-50 Touch Response section but only to the modulation section.

All sounds coming from The mighty 1977 Yamaha CS-80 analog synthesizer.
The song is called Ode To The Holy Grail Part II composed by Firechild.

The CS-50 was released just ahead of its famous big brothers, the CS-60 and CS-80. The CS-50 looks like a scaled-down version of the monstrous CS-80, and it is! This will benefit those who crave the famous classic Yamaha synth sound without the struggle of lugging around the 215 pound CS-80! The CS-50 weighs in at about 100 pounds. The CS-50 is also just 4-voice polyphonic, and lacks the quality weighted 61-note keyboard of the CS-80. The CS-50 has just a 49-note standard keyboard. It does feature pressure (aftertouch) sensitivity route-able to several destinations, however.

The CS-50′s sound is unmistakably related to other classic CS-series synthesizers. At just four voices with one osc. per voice and lacking warm filters (at just 12dB/oct) the CS-50′s sound can be thin. There are 13 preset sounds of various instruments and synth sounds but, unfortunately, no on-board memory storage for your edited presets. At its low street price, the CS-50 makes a great way to get your hands on these classic sounds without going broke! It’s too bad their tuning is just as unstable as the other CS-series synths. It’s housed in a built-in travel-case like the other (big) CS-synths

Roland FA-08 Workstation – First Look

January 16, 2014 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Dave Bryce checks out Roland’s first new workstation since the Fantom-G, the FA series.

Roland has announced two new workstation keyboards, the FA-08 and FA-06, which it says meet the needs of anyone who wants an instrument that they can use both on stage and in the studio.

Featuring a built-in audio interface, DAW integration, more than 2000 sounds from the Integra-7 sound module and an 88-note weighted action keyboard, the FA-08 weighs in at 16kg. It comes with a 16-track sequencer, and each of the 16 available parts can access its own effects engine, which sports 67 effect types. The UK price is £1529.

Full specs are below. The FA-06 boasts very similar specs but comes with a 61-note velocity-sensitive keyboard. It retails for £975. You can find out more about both models on the Roland website.

Featuring a huge selection of Roland’s best sounds, a 16-track sequencer, seamless DAW integration, an easy-to-use sampler, and much more, the new FA series completely reimagines the music workstation for effortless real-time power, ultra-fast workflow, and maximum versatility.

FA-06 (61-Key)
http://www.rolandconnect.com/product….

FA-08 (88-Key)
http://www.rolandconnect.com/product….

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