Time machine: ROLAND D-70 Digital Synthesizer 1990

November 16, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Taking a closer look at the vintage synth Roland D-70, video details below:

I played the Roland D-70 without any additional effects or eq. All you hear is coming straight out of the Roland D-70.

The fully digital Roland D-70 employs a LA (Linear Arithmetic) sound engine. It contains samples which can be filtered with lowpass/bandpass/highpass filters. The oscillators can be modulated via DLM (differential loop modulation). This can produce weird sounds, like heard in the video. A pity, that the JD-800 does not have this feature. It also has a multi effect processor built in (reverb, chorus, delay…). It has TONE PALLETE sliders, which help a lot to tweak the sounds.

In my opinion, the D-70 is more a “live performance synth” than a studio synthesizer. That’s the reason why a rack version never appeared.

The D-70 is very complex. But not exactly the synthesis engine – rather the performance functions: splits, MIDI functions, controller maps, master keyboard functions and that sort of things…. but I must admit, sometimes it sounds beautiful.

It was used by Michael Cretu (Enigma, Sandra).

Roland Juno 60 single synth demo: The Lost Weekend

November 11, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

All sounds from the Roland Juno 60, no midi.

The Roland Juno-60 is a popular analogue 61-key polyphonic synthesizer introduced by Roland Corporation in 1982 and a successor to the slightly earlier Juno-6. Like its predecessor, the Juno-60 has some digital enhancements, used only for clocking the oscillators and for saving and loading patches. This instrument was succeeded by the Roland Juno-106 in 1984. Roland was losing market share with the Juno-6 in competition against the Korg Polysix. Related in features and price-class, the Polysix featured external control and patch memory, which the Juno-6 lacked. These features were quickly added to the Juno-6′s design, which sonically and architecturally did not change notably between the two versions, and then released as the Juno-60.

The Juno-60 synthesizer is a six-voice polyphonic synthesizer. The single digitally controlled oscillator (or DCO for short) per voice gave the Juno-60 a high degree of stability in maintaining tune; most analogue voltage-controlled oscillators (VCOs) of the time would tend to drift in pitch and require re-tuning of the oscillator. The DCO provides sawtooth and square/pulse waveforms as a sound source, in addition to white noise and a square-wave suboscillator pitched one octave beneath the key played. Both of these additional sources can be mixed in with dedicated sliders.

The filters and envelope on the Juno-60 rely on control voltages sent by depressing the keys on the keyboard and were thus analogue. The Juno-60 features a rather distinctive-sounding 24 dB/octave lowpass filter with resonance. Unlike other VCF’s of the day, the Juno-60′s is capable of self-oscillation and thus could be used to some degree as a tone generator in and of itself. The filter section also features controls for envelope amount and polarity, LFO modulation, and keyboard tracking. In addition, a three-position non-resonant highpass filter is provided to thin out lower frequencies.

The signal is then sent through a voltage-controlled amplifier (or VCA) and a simple four-stage ADSR filter envelope.

The Juno-60 provides limited options for modulating the audio signal. A single triangle-wave variable-rate LFO is provided as a modulation source; this can be mixed into the DCO to create vibrato or into the lowpass filter to generate a tremolo effect. The LFO can either be triggered manually by the left hand using a large button above the pitch bend lever or set to engage automatically whenever a key was pressed.

Vintage exploration: Roland Jupiter-6

November 10, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

The baby brother of the Jupiter-8. Still a pretty great machine, with an awesome arpeggiator and the cool Jupiter sound.

Italo-Disco style live improvisation with JP-6, TR-707, SH-101. Leveraging the power of the JP-6′s sweet sounding multi-mode filter
Roland Jupiter-6 = BPF pad, portamento brass
Roland TR-707 = rhythm
Roland SH-101 = sequenced synth bass

The Roland Jupiter-6 (JP-6) is a synthesizer manufactured by the Roland Corporation introduced in January 1983 as a less expensive alternative to the Roland Jupiter-8. The Jupiter-6 is widely considered a workhorse among polyphonic analog synthesizers, capable of producing a wide variety of sounds, such as ambient drones, pads, lead synthesizer lines, and techy blips and buzzes. It is renowned for its reliability and easy, but sophisticated programmability.

The JP-6 has 12 analog oscillators (2 per voice), and is bitimbral, allowing its keyboard to be “split” into two sounds – one with 4 voices, and one with the remaining 2 voices (either “Split 4/2″ or “Split 2/4″ mode). “Whole Mode” is also available, dedicating all 6 voices to single (monotimbral) sound across the entire keyboard.

The JP-6 was among the first electronic instruments (alongside the Roland JX-3P and the Sequential Circuits Prophet-600) to feature MIDI, then a brand new technology. Sequential CEO Dave Smith demonstrated MIDI by connecting the Prophet to a Jupiter-6 during the January, 1983 Winter NAMM Show.

Europa, a popular firmware replacement available from ‘Synthcom Systems’ adds modern enhancements to the instrument’s MIDI implementation, user interface and arpeggiator, turning the Jupiter 6 into a contemporaneously adaptable machine

Arturia Microbrute Jam with Roland TR-909 and Strymon TimeLine

November 10, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

More noodling around with the Arturia MicroBrute and one of the factory programmed sequences.

“One of the best features of the MiniBrute and MicroBrute is the Metalizer function on the triangle wave. Since the LFO can sync to the sequencer and the sequencer is being synced to the 909, the LFO is now synced to MIDI clock and the rate knob now acts as a clock divider for the LFO as I modulate the filter with the various waveforms and speed intervals. The camera stopped recording about halfway though, which I guess is alright since it was getting rather repetitive.”

Free sample pack from the Roland JD-800 flagship synthesizer

November 8, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

legowelt_jd800_thumb

Legowelt has released a free sample pack featuring 350 samples from the 1992 JD-800 flagship synthesizer from Roland.

The JD-800 is Roland’s answer to half a decade of hard-to-program synthesizers. Covered in sliders that act as dedicated editors just like a classic analog synth, the JD-800 is an extremely programmable and hands-on digital synthesizer. It is also an interesting and great sounding digital synth with incredible flexibility and control. Internal ROM based waveforms are combined to build your sounds. The sounds are based on Roland’s D-50, but updated for the nineties with multimode filters – uncommon but welcome at the time.

Colossal Juicy Thick Basses, bizarre unearthly pads, uncanny strings, mystifying effects, entrancing chords and lots lots more all ready for u to use in your sampler, DAW, tracker, workstation, MPC, Octatrack or whatever u use Let the creative juices drip from your sampler Rub yourself in the sap of this giant beast and break through the event horizon of music production

The sample pack is a free (203MB) download at Legowelt.

Get it here >>

Time machine: ROLAND SH-2000 Analog Synthesizer 1974

November 8, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

AnalogAudio1 plays the Roland SH-2000 with reverb effects from a Lexicon MPX-500 and delay effects from a Roland DEP-5.

The Roland SH-2000 is a preset monophonic analog synth with aftertouch. You can tweak the presets a bit with LFO and filter controls.

The SH-2000, introduced in 1973, is Roland’s second synthesizer and is essentially a limited version of the SH-1000. Like the 1000, it is a single-oscillator monophonic analog Preset synthesizer designed to sit atop a home organ. It’s got a great old analog sound but its lack of edit-ability and connectivity compared to the SH-1000 is what ultimately holds it back from being really great.

SH-2000_Front

Its 37-note keyboard are several colorful tab switches which are used to select any one of its 30 Preset sounds. They range from the usual to the unusual: Tuba, Trombone, French Horn, Trumpet, Saxophone, Bassoon, Oboe, Flute, Clarinet, Cello, Violin, Bass Guitar, Hawaiian Guitar, Banjo, Fuzz Guitar I, Fuzz Guitar II; Piano, Harpsichord, Accordion, Vibraphone, Xylophone; Singing Voice, Song Whistle, Popcorn, Space Reed, Planet, Frog Man, Funny Cat, Growl Wow and Wind.

Left of the keyboard are the only editable controllers available on the SH-2000. They include the filter’s cutoff, resonance and modulation sliders, LFO modulation rate, portamento, vibrato, pitch bend, volume and master tuning. The filter and LFO are severely limited and there are no ADSR envelope controls. However, the cool ‘Growl’ and ‘Wow’ effects and the Random Note Generator from the SH-1000 are here, which is nice. Amazingly, this 1973 synth has aftertouch, called the ‘Touch Effect’ which can be assigned to modulate the volume, Vibrato, pitch, ‘Wow’ and ‘Growl’ effects. A few other drawbacks to the SH-2000 is the total lack of CV/Gate for external communication and no user memory.

The SH-2000 is great for squeaky effects and growling bass notes. However the SH-1000 offers much more flexibility and a better sounding filter.

Elektron Analog Four with Octatrak & Roland TR 606 Drum

November 5, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

The 606 has been modded by Analogue Solutions.
Much punchier than my old one :-)

roland-tr-606

The 606 was the percussion side-kick to the TB-303. It even looks like the 303. It stores up to 32 patterns and 8 songs. The 606 allows switching between Pattern Play and Write mode while running – making the 606 the only drumcomputer in the X0X series that can be edited while performing and switching patterns. It is also possible to link up to 4 consecutive patterns in Pattern Play mode. There is only a mono audio output, however there are mods from Kenton Electronics and Analog Solutions that will add individual outputs for each drum tone.

The 606 has seven analog drum sounds which are simple, yet great! Kick, Snare, 2 toms, open hat, closed hat, cymbal, accent. The hi-hats are a very tinny electronic sound and its toms are great for soft tribal patterns.

 

Japanese Techno Girl Love MC-202 & TB-303 & TR-606

October 29, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Awesome :-D

【電音道-DEN ON DO-】 is
A Japanese woman’s bride practice

MainPhrase 「SAKURA 」 A traditional children’s song of Japan

- Roland MC-202 (Sequence & “SAKURA”) DIN-SNYC MASTER
- Roland TR-606 (DrumBeats) DYN-SYNC SLAVE
- Roland TB-303 (AcidBass)  DYN-SYNC SLAVE
- BOSS BX-800 (8ch Mixer)  I Love Noisy Mixer !

by PuneumaRecord
http://www.pneuma.sakura.ne.jp/
http://pneuma.sblo.jp/
https://twitter.com/KousokuNabla

Roland U-220 sound demos

October 28, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

The rack-mounted version of the U-20. Plenty of realistic sounds (especially for the time), and several drawn from classic Roland synths like Jupiter-8 and D-50.

The U-220 is a digital synthesizer that uses ROM samples of pianos, brass, strings, bass, drums, etc. However it is built for professional use and is truly a quality instrument, even though its sounds may seem like dated-eighties synth pop cheese. It’s got nice piano sounds, but they’re not the real thing. It features 6 part multitimbrality with a 7th drum part, plus 2 direct outputs and 2 stereo outputs. The 30 note polyphony helps if you take advantage of this synths multitimbrality for creating entire performances and ensembles. Digital reverb, chorus and delay effects liven up your sounds. Editing is simple, but there are no filters. With several performance features, the U-20 has a full 61 note keyboard with velocity and aftertouch. There’s an on-board arpeggiator, a chord-memory feature and the U-20 accepts Roland SNU-110 sound library cards.

“Industrial World” 2013

October 24, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Background video information:

Hi everyone! SynthFreq here with a new composition titled “Industrial World” written by Crystal (msMotif-6), performed by Danielle and Crystal using the following synths:
Jupiter-8: filtered bell patch
Roland D-50: bright ice
Roland Alpha Juno-1: Z-lead
Roland A-90ex: split syn bass/(midi) to JV-1080 pulse lead
Yamaha Motif-6: percussion live set

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