DJ/Producer Dave Clarke meets MiniBrute

January 18, 2014 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

The Techno legend welcomes Arturia in his boat studio in Amsterdam to tell you what he thinks about MiniBrute

About Clarke:

Educated at Brighton College, Clarke ran away from home at the age of 16 after his parents split up. After briefly sleeping rough, a friend offered him temporary accommodation. All that kept him going was his love for music, initially hip hop and post-punk (The Damned are a favourite of his to this day)and the money from his job in a shoe shop.His success as a DJ began with a residency at the Brighton nightclub Toppers.

In the late 1980s, Clarke used to write reviews for UK magazines such as Mixmag Update, Generator and ID, and was the first to review Aphex Twin.

In the 1990s, he began producing and releasing music using the moniker Hardcore. This project was subsequently licensed to the Belgian label R&S, enabling Clarke to be one of the first UK artists to record in the R&S studio in Ghent, and sign to the label.After this he recorded under various guises, including Graphite and Fly by Wire, but in 1993 he dropped these names and recorded only under Dave Clarke. Recognition of his talent came in 1994 when a series of EPs with the collective name of Red and his debut album Archive One received rave reviews, as they were seen as being innovative and crossing genres, something not common in the techno scene at the time.After the success of the Red series, John Peel gave Clarke his moniker, ‘The Baron of Techno’, which has stuck with him ever since.

Clarke’s sense of rhythm and DJ skills have earned him the respect of his peers – he is mentioned as an influence on the 1997 Daft Punk song “Teachers”. He has a longstanding relationship with visceral, intense techno, and is considered one of the innovators of the genre, even being used as a musical reference point in the German school syllabus.Clarke’s DJ style consists of virtuoso cutting and scratching during his predominantly techno sets (although he sometimes plays electro and even other genres). His style is showcased on two mix albums World Service and World Service 2; the former was voted #9 in the Resident Advisor poll of best mix albums of the 2000s. His album Devil’s Advocate, released in 2003, is a mixture of techno and hip hop featuring Chicks on Speed and DJ Rush. He also made an experimental John Peel Sessions EP under the name ‘Directional Force’ on the Strange Fruit label.

Clarke relocated to Amsterdam in 2008 and has become a key player in the annual Amsterdam dance event. He is a regular DJ presence at top global clubs such as Fabric in London, Berghain in Berlin, and Fuse in Brussels. He has also played a wide range of festivals including Glastonbury,Pukkelpop, and I Love Techno, as well as curating his own successful stage at Tomorrowland in Belgium since 2012.

Arturia Microbrute Sessions — MICRO treated with ext Cotoff Trigger Seqencer

January 17, 2014 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

The MICRO is beeing treated with ext Cotoff Trigger Seqencer Doepfer A.-155. In Sync with the internal sequencer + Modular Kick..

Mulperi Sounds for Arturia SEM V

January 12, 2014 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

50 presets for Arturia SEM V virtual synthesizer. Make sure you check out what Modulation wheel does with all patches!

Buy this soundbank at www.mulperi.net

Arturia MiniBrute Review

January 10, 2014 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Background video description:

My reaction and playing around with the Minibrute. Also included is a quick look at the preset templates. Check out this awesome analog synth!

Arturia Microbrute and Electro-Harmonix 8 Step Sequencer

December 21, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Controlling the CV inputs of the Arturia Microbrute using the Electro-Harmonix 8 Step sequencer. Free running and synced to Midi Clock from Logic Pro X

Brute LFO – iOS App Demo

December 20, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Brute LFO is an iOS App for iPhone, iPad & iPod Touch, which outputs control voltages (CV) from the device’s headphone output. Connect it to your Arturia Microbrute or other analog gear, like a Modular Synthesizer, to modulate your sounds. The headphone output voltages aren’t very high on iOS devices, so it’s more of a subtle modulation, but Brute LFO also sounds awesome when pushed into audio range. There are two simultaneous oscillators and a third one to modulate the other two’s frequency. Switch on “Brute” mode to dirty the waveforms up some more. Not shown in the video: The performance pad mode, in which you can use two touch pads to adjust four parameters simply by swiping your fingers on the screen.

Visit the Brute LFO website here:
http://www.justuskandzi.com/brute-lfo…

“The Brute LFO is a powerful low frequency oscillator that modulates your analog gear. If you have a hardware synth that allows you to use external gear to modulate the pitch, the filter, or any other parameter, just plug the Brute LFO into the CV in and start playing. It consists of three separate LFOs. LFO 1 and 2 can be controlled using the control elements in the top half of the screen. The big knob in he middle sets the rate of both the LFOs. Additionally you can change the waveforms of the LFOs, detune LFO 2 and change its phase. The amount knob in the top half also sets the overall amount of the modulation. The elements on the bottom half (LFO 3) can be used to modulate the frequency of LFO 1 and 2. And the brute switch destroys everything!”

Three nice Arturia Analog Experience The Laboratory 61 Arp 2600 V2 Sound Demos

December 16, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Just going through some of the sounds in the Arp 2600 V2 Bank.

Going through yet more of the Arp 2600 V2 patches.

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With the addition of 200 scenes organized by genres, including drum loops, advanced arpeggiation melodies and ways to allocate sounds to different parts of your keyboard, Analog Laboratory is likely to become your favorite synth workstation, constantly feeding your creativity with inspiring ideas.

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Arturia Spark Vintage Linn Drum + OP-X PRO-II performing “One Million Years”

December 7, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Background video description:

In this video I am using the Arturia Spark Vintage drum machine along with the Sonic Projects OP-X PRO-II. This is part of one of my original compositions that is still in the making. Thanks for taking the time to check it out!

MicroBrute: How to make drum sounds

December 6, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

How to make drum sounds with the Arturia MicroBrute, including a kick/bass drum, high hats and a sort of “hand clap”. Pause the video on the stills to check out the positions of all the controls required to recreate these sounds.

Arturia MicroBrute Wave Test

December 3, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

In a fairly non-musical environment (straight note on, without a single inch of grace), a simple investigation on waveforms and their treatmens on Arturia MicroBrute. Ultrasaw, Pulse Width, Metal Triangle; plus Subosc and Fifth third harmonic suboscillation. No musical efforts, just waveform (be careful).

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