Forbidden Colours-Merry Christmas Mr Lawrence (Ryuichi Sakamoto) on Jupiter 80

June 10, 2014 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Cover on Jupiter 80 by Studioliv
“Merry Christmas Mr Lawrence” (Ryuichi Sakamoto)
Forbidden Colours

Electribe MX goes Sakamoto with Merry Christmas Mr.Lawrence

October 16, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Merry Christmas, Mr. Lawrence is a 1983 Japanese film directed by Nagisa Oshima, produced by Jeremy Thomas and starring David Bowie, Tom Conti, Ryuichi Sakamoto and Takeshi Kitano. It was written by Oshima and Paul Mayersberg and based on Laurens van der Post’s experiences during World War II as a prisoner of war as depicted in his works The Seed and the Sower (1963) and The Night of the New Moon (1970). Sakamoto also wrote the score and the vocal theme “Forbidden Colours,” featuring David Sylvian, which was a hit single in many territories. The film was entered into the 1983 Cannes Film Festival in competition for the Palme d’Or. Sakamoto’s score also won the film a BAFTA Award for Best Film Music.

Background video description:

My name is KN. I am a Japanese track maker and DJ.

Twitter: http://twitter.com/#!/KN_famima

Worlds in a small room – interview with Steve Jansen (former member of Japan)

September 21, 2011 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Steelberry Clones had the great opportunity to talk to Steve Jansen during his recent visit to Sweden. Steve Jansen was former percussionist in the legendary 1980’s new romantic act Japan (also featuring David Sylvian, Richard Barbieri and Mick Karn). After the band decided to quit in 1982 Steve has embarked on a long and successful journey, some times in collaboration with his brother David Sylvian on his solo albums, sometimes in more unknown appearances together with Japanese artists like Yukohiro Takahashi (YMO), but also driving more pop orientated endeavors with the Dolphin Brothers, which he started together with Richard Barbieri. Steve Jansen has at many occasions been dubbed as one of the most important percussionist of his time, and the characteristic sound that gave way for their all time selling album Tin Drum, has provided him with the opportunity to play with most of the leading artists since then. I wanted to know more on what has happened since then, his views on today’s music scene and the evolution of electronic music, as well as discovering his more recent works in the border lands between pop, ambient, arts and experimental music.

Today’s music scene

Steve Jansen is a highly productive musician, if it is not something on his own doing you will certainly find Steve in collaborations with David Sylvian, John Foxx, or as part of the band on tour with Ryuichi Sakamoto in Japan. So I asked Steve to give me an update on what he is up to right now and his collaboration with Sugizo.

Most recently Steve has been involved in finalizing Mick Karn’s new Dalis Car album, partly to keep his spirit alive, but also as a fund raising initiative for his relatives. Steve has therefore been active both as a mixer and performer of the new album and engaged in the process of reworking some of the new tracks. The yet untitled album is due out in the October – November time frame. As most of you know Mick Karn died recently and one of things that Mick Karn was doing at the time was to produce a new Dalis Car album. Dalis Car’s first album “The Walking Hour” released in 1984 was an interesting album where the borders between various musical styles were mixed to create a very unique album at the time. With Sugizo Steve recently contributed a rhythm track to a new recording, a track also featuring Mick Karn on bass.

With some thirty years as a musician, working across most prominent genres – as a new romantic pop star as part of Japan, to exploring the fields of ambient electronics and jazz fusion, to bridging the gap between modern art visuals and experimental music, it is highly relevant to ask Steve’s view on today’s music scene. Steve says that today’s scene is of course in many ways very different from back when he started his career. The power of the record companies put a lot of constraints and pressure on the bands to deliver on time, but also to make music in line with what they and the fans were requesting – “pleasing the record label almost became a means to an end”, Steve says. Today you have much more freedom to explore and the artists does not work under the same pressure. So although it is harder to make a living you are the one in control. With modern music technology you almost have endless possibilities to manipulate sounds and craft your own ideas – inside your head.

Back to Japan

You really cannot write about Steve without touching on the subject of Japan, both as a band and as the country where both David and Steve over the years has continued to find inspiration, collaborations and a solid fan base. When Japan ended as a band in 1982, (doing their last tour in Japan, followed by a live album), the band members ended up doing several projects on their own or in collaborations with each other.

I wanted to know how this fascination with Japan as a country came to shape their music going forward. Steve tells me that it has probably been more that they have all individually made their own subjective interpretations of the music. And although it was a strong influence on the Tin Drum album, Steve says that more recently it has been more important for him to embrace modern rhythms and electronic sounds, although that he has in his collaboration with Sugizo been working to incorporate the sounds of traditional Japanese Taiko drums.

Steve and David Sylvian have over the years done several highly acclaimed albums where they have been exploring the boundaries of ambient, electronic and jazz. As a listener you can easily picture late night improvisations where Steve and David together with other musicians like Harold Budd and Robert Fripp, would jam together beautiful ambient landscapes. I wanted to know if this was an accurate image of the music production process and how the songs took their shape.

Read the full story here >>

Sounds from the upcoming new David Sylvian album

May 28, 2011 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

I Should Not Dare by Samadhisound

“I Should Not Dare” taken from David’s new album Died in the Wool, which is out next week (31st May in USA). ‘I should not dare’ sets Emily Dickinson’s poem to music accompanied by Christian Fennesz and Jan Bang. Read more about “Died in Wool” by David Sylvian on the official release page at http://www.davidsylvian.com/…

Old timer David Sylvian is back with new material

May 1, 2011 · Posted in Uncategorized · 1 Comment 

We have not been overly impressed with what David Sylvian (Japan) has been up to for the past 5 (or even 10) years, but perhaps this is about to change with this new release:

Died in the Wool – variations on David Sylvian’s 2009 release Manafon including collaborations with acclaimed composer Dai Fujikura, producers Jan Bang and Erik Honoré and a stellar roster of contemporary musicians and improvisers. See the full track listing of both discs below and you can listen to the tracks on the Died in the wool microsite at http://www.davidsylvian.com/…

Nice interview with The Dolphin Brothers

February 4, 2011 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Former Japan members Richard Barbieri and Steven Jansen (David Sylvian’s brother) in an interview relating to their venture with The Dolphin Brothers some years back

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8MG_fBvFTR4

And here is one of my favorites from the album “Catch the Fall”

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