John Bowen Solaris Demo

November 11, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Another demo of the Solaris synthesizer by John Bowen. Everything is played live using the keyboard, joystick, ribbon controller, modulation wheel and assign buttons. Lots of real-time performance controls on this synth :)

John_Bowen_Solaris-Anthracite

The general concept behind the Solaris synthesizer is to implement something like a giant wall-sized modular system entirely in software where you can select among several completely different types of oscillators and filters, exquisitely modelled after the components culled from a variety of legendary vintage synthesizers of yesteryear and even some current virtual analog innovations of today. With up to four oscillators, four filters, four amplifiers, four four-input mixers, six envelope generators, one looping envelope generator, five LFOs, two vector mixers and still more of these software modules available in each program, the Solaris synthesizer becomes absolutely unrivalled in terms of versatility and programmability.

 

John Bowen Solaris – Modulating the Decimator with Envelope Generator

August 7, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

“So I went to GC today to “test drive” the King Korg to get my free T-Shirt. I was having lots of fun controlling its decimator in real time. I asked the sales person if you could control it from an EG and the reply was “I don’t think so”.

Ah, but you can with the Solaris. Here’s a simple patch using the “Jaws” waveform (supersaw) while I tweak EG2 to modulate the decimator. Not anything super musical, but just a quick demonstration of just a taste of the Solaris’ modulation capabilities.”

A new exploration of the John Bowen Solaris synth – Demo

June 30, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Here is the second demo of the Solaris synth by John Bowen (www.johnbowen.com). Everything is played live using the keyboard, mod wheel, pitchbend and joystick.

john-bowen-solaris-dark

At the recent Musikmesse in Frankfurt, John was asked how the Solaris was conceived. He told us, “When I was at Korg, we were working on the software for the original OASYS card and I noticed that Creamware were essentially doing the same thing. I saw the virtual Minimoog come out on Scope and went to try a system in Canada, and when I realised that Korg was probably not going to continue with our little group, I jumped ship. After a year with Creamware and some consultancy work elsewhere, I decided to go it alone and see whether I could make it writing plug‑ins for the Scope platform. My first plug‑in had been called the Orion and, because people kept asking me to add things, it just grew and grew until, around the fourth iteration, I went bonkers and added lots of new stuff and then realised that it wasn’t the same product any more. So I gave it a new name and the Solaris plug‑in was born. I thought it wouldn’t be too shabby as a hardware instrument, and since the ex‑Creamware guys and I had remained friends and said that someday we would do something together, we decided to develop what is now the Solaris keyboard. By this time, the plug‑in had grown to over 1200 parameters, so I had to figure out a way to translate its user interface into a physical control panel. I had wanted to try multiple displays on a hardware synth for some time, and at first we were thinking of the Solaris as something with a small keyboard, but when I mocked things up to fit the available width, the front panel looked too ‘deep’. Arranging everything across a wider keyboard, it became clear that this was how the Solaris needed to be.”

Alternatives to Solaris:

One alternative to the Solaris is the Arturia Origin, which also offers vintage synth emulations and complex modulation capabilities in a flexible architecture. Indeed, the Origin is in some ways even more flexible than the Solaris because it is truly modular, in the sense that you can create whole new architectures by choosing the number and type of modules used. Another alternative is the Access Virus TI Keyboard, a synthesizer powerhouse that offers fewer programming options but a huge number of voices, a vast number of effects, and a 16‑part multi mode with dedicated effects per part.

In relation to the video:

For better audio quality go to SoundCloud: http://soundcloud.com/insanic4/solari…

John Bowen Solaris Demo

June 10, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Here is a demo of the Solaris synth by John Bowen (www.johnbowen.com).

“I have this fantastic synt for a week now and worked with it for 6 evenings. I started building my own sounds right away and in this demo you can hear a sound that uses vector and wavetable synthesis. Everything is played live using the keyboard, the joystick, the 4 part switch buttons and the pitch and modulation wheel. This synth is the king of evolving sounds!

For better audio quality go to SoundCloud:
http://soundcloud.com/insanic4/solari…

The general concept behind the Solaris synthesizer is to implement something like a giant wall-sized modular system entirely in software where you can select among several completely different types of oscillators and filters, exquisitely modelled after the components culled from a variety of legendary vintage synthesizers of yesteryear and even some current virtual analog innovations of today. With up to four oscillators, four filters, four amplifiers, four four-input mixers, six envelope generators, one looping envelope generator, five LFOs, two vector mixers and still more of these software modules available in each program, the Solaris synthesizer becomes absolutely unrivalled in terms of versatility and programmability.

NAMM 2012 John Bowen Solaris synth

January 25, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Checking out the monster digital modular synth from John Bowen called Solaris

Background information:

From the beginning, the singular mission for Solaris has been to create nothing less than John Bowen’s personal vision of the ultimate, dream-come-true synthesizer. A vision that draws upon more than three decades of experience in synthesizer design with legends like Moog Music, Sequential Circuits, the Korg Wavestation series and renowned software synthesizers for the original Korg OASYS and Creamware Scope platforms. And it’s a vision to create a truly musical instrument masterpiece that is shared with some of the world’s foremost synthesizer connoisseurs like film composer Hans Zimmer who is renowned for always seeking the utmost in sound creation capabilities.

  • 4 Oscillators, each with several types available:
    MultiMode, WaveTable, CEM, WAV (sample playback),
    VS (single cycle waves), Mini
  • 4 Filters, each with selectable Inputs. Filter types are:
  • MultiMode Lowpass, 24, 18, 12, 6 dB, Highpass 24, 18, 12, 6 dB, Bandpass 24 dB, Comb (2 types), State Variable 12 dB LP, HP, BP, & BR,SSM Lowpass 24 dB , Mini (Ladder) Lowpass 24 dB, Vocal Formant
  • 2 Vector Mixers, 2 Rotors (special 4-step waveshape sequences),
    2 AM sections (includes Ring Mod)
  • 6 DADSRs, 1 8-stage loopable envelope
  • 4 free LFOs, 1 Vibrato LFO. Each LFO features delayed start,
    fade in and fade out times, key sync and Phase control
  • Phaser, Chorus/Flanger, Phaser, Delay, 3-band EQ effects

John Bowen talks about the Solaris

October 20, 2010 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

More news from Munich

Munich 2010, Synth Meeting [Synthesizer Treffen], John Bowen talks about the Solaris”
Via Moogulator of http://sequencer.de/

You can see John’s talk at the PNW Synth Gathering in this post.
See the John Bowen label below for all posts including more video of the Solaris.

This is really a synthesizer to look out for!

For those who don’t know who John Bowen is, John was responsible for the original 40 factory programs of the Prophet 5, and as Sequential’s Product Specialist created 99% of all of the factory sounds and sequences (as well as most of the original Prophet VS waveshapes), also contributing to the User Interface (UI) design for the following Sequential products: Prophet 5, Prophet 10, Prophet 600, Prophet T-8, Prophet VS, Drumtraks, 6-Trak, MultiTrak, Tom, Max, Studio 440, and the Prophet 2000 and 3000 libraries.

Solaris Synth light (left angle) Proto 3

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