Sequential Circuits Prophet VS “Wave 75″ Choir

March 24, 2014 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Vintage synthesizer demo track by RetroSound
“Wave 75″ is the famous VS choir.

all synth sounds: Sequential Circuits Prophet VS Vector Synthesizer (1986)
drums: Roland TR-808 (1982)
recording: multi-tracking without midi
fx: reverb and delay

SEQUENTIAL CIRCUITS SIX-TRAK Analog Synthesizer 1984

March 9, 2014 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Youtube alias ‘AnalogAudio1′, takes a look at the vintage Sequential Circuits Six-Trak analog synthesizer, details below:

Synthesizer demo of the analog synthesizer SCI Six-Trak from 1984. It was the first multitimbral MIDI synth on the market (it came before Oberheim Xpander). The Six-Trak has that typical SCI and DSI hardware design – great, classic look with massive wooden end cheeks.

In this movie I play some of my own sounds – on some sounds I used a digital delay (Roland DEP-5) and reverb (Lexicon MPX-500). In the intro I used the sequencer of the Six-Trak.

The Six-Trak has 1 VCO per voice (6 voice polyphonic). It also has PWM, 3 ADSRs, 24 dB VCF, noise generator, LFO with different waveforms. It has a sort of “slimmed down polymodulation”: VCF modulation by VCO for dirty and metallic timbres. Unison mode for fat, monophonic sounds. Great “stack mode” allows layering of six different patches. The Six-Trak also has a little 6 track sequencer and an arpeggiator built in.

I like the Six-Trak very much. I would wish it had multiple outputs and a chorus effect.

Vintage demo: Sequential Circuits Prophet 5 Rev 3.3

December 15, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

One of the first fully programmable polyphonic analog synths, the Prophet 5 is the most classic synthesizer of the eighties! It is capable of a delightful analog sound unique to Sequential’s Prophet series in which the P5 was King! Five voice polyphony – two oscillators per voice and a white noise generator. The analog filters, envelope and LFO all sound great and are extremely flexible. The P5 had patch memory storage as well, which scanned and memorized every knob setting for storing and recalling your sounds – a desperately needed feature at the time!

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The P5 lacked MIDI (a feature that came later on the P5 spin-off, the Prophet 600). But it is still loved even today for its great string sounds, analog effects, and punchy analog basses. Unfortunately the P5 is not immune to the dark side of vintage synths – it has its fair share of analog synth problems such as unstable tuning, it’s difficult to repair, lacks MIDI, etc.

There are basically three versions of the Prophet 5:

Rev 1 P5s are pretty unreliable, if you find one; they’re also quite rare. These were all hand-assembled in the ‘garage stage’ of the company.

Rev 2 uses SSM chips, and has some differences in its control logic capabilities from the final version. It can’t be retrofitted for MIDI, but is considered by most to be the better-sounding of the two ‘common’ P5s.

Rev 3 is the final version, and subsequent Rev 3.1, Rev 3.2 and Rev 3.3 each are capable of taking a MIDI retrofit. They’re also capable of microtonal tuning. The audio quality of the Rev 3 is different, however, as it uses Curtis chips instead of Rev 2′s SSMs; many people think the Rev 3 units sound ‘thinner’. The Rev 3, however, is considered the most reliable of all of the different versions and they had 120 memory patches.

Background video description:

All sounds are coming from the Sequential Circuits Prophet 5 Rev 3.3 Synthesizer. You can also see the Rev 2 Prophet in the video but it will be another video…Composed and Played by Mr Firechild.

SEQUENTIAL CIRCUITS PROPHET 600 DEMO

December 13, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Short Demo of the vintage analog synthesizer Sequential circuits Prophet 600.

The first commercially available synth to implement MIDI!! It’s a fun synth. Its big brother is the legendary Prophet 5. The P600 is very affordable today and is a great buy. Models with the newest software will enjoy polyphonic MIDI implementation and up to 100 memory patches to store their own sounds! The sound of the Prophet 600 is brighter and harsher than that of a Juno 106 but still just as funky.

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The P600 has two oscillators per voice with sawtooth, triangle and variable pulse waveforms. The oscillators can be individually tuned or synced together. Similar quality VCF and VCA sections from the Prophet 5 can be found here too! The P5′s Poly-Mod section has also been passed onto the P600. The P600 is extremely versatile and easy to use! Its best functions include the onboard arpeggiator, 2-track sequencer and poly-modulation. The P600 is great for creating analog effects, swells and drones. It has a cool glide effect and has very flexible modulation possibilities!

Tune made with SCI Prophet VS & Pro-One

November 1, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Vintage synthesizer demo track featuring two classic synths

pad, fx and lead sounds: Sequential Circuits Prophet VS (1986)
bass: Sequential Circuits Pro-One (1981)
drums: Roland TR-707
recording: multi-tracking without midi
fx: reverb and delay

Checking out the Prophet 5 – Demo

August 23, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

One of the first fully programmable polyphonic analog synths, the Prophet 5 is the most classic synthesizer of the eighties! It is capable of a delightful analog sound unique to Sequential’s Prophet series in which the P5 was King! Five voice polyphony – two oscillators per voice and a white noise generator. The analog filters, envelope and LFO all sound great and are extremely flexible. The P5 had patch memory storage as well, which scanned and memorized every knob setting for storing and recalling your sounds – a desperately needed feature at the time!

The P5 lacked MIDI (a feature that came later on the P5 spin-off, the Prophet 600). But it is still loved even today for its great string sounds, analog effects, and punchy analog basses. Unfortunately the P5 is not immune to the dark side of vintage synths – it has its fair share of analog synth problems such as unstable tuning, it’s difficult to repair, lacks MIDI, etc.

Pro53perspective

There are basically three versions of the Prophet 5:

Rev 1 P5s are pretty unreliable, if you find one; they’re also quite rare. These were all hand-assembled in the ‘garage stage’ of the company.

Rev 2 uses SSM chips, and has some differences in its control logic capabilities from the final version. It can’t be retrofitted for MIDI, but is considered by most to be the better-sounding of the two ‘common’ P5s.

Rev 3 is the final version, and subsequent Rev 3.1, Rev 3.2 and Rev 3.3 each are capable of taking a MIDI retrofit. They’re also capable of microtonal tuning. The audio quality of the Rev 3 is different, however, as it uses Curtis chips instead of Rev 2′s SSMs; many people think the Rev 3 units sound ‘thinner’. The Rev 3, however, is considered the most reliable of all of the different versions and they had 120 memory patches.

Drumtraks, Six-Trak, and Juno-60

August 5, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

A slow piece with Sequential Circuits Drumtraks & Six-Trak, and Roland Juno-60.

Switched On Walk Through feat. Sequential Circuits Prophet-5

August 3, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

This week your hearing the immense sound of the Sequential Circuits Prophet-5 being processed through a Roland RE-301 Chorus Tape Echo.

SCI Prophet 5 vs DSI Prophet 08 Test

July 9, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

INHALT goes hands on comparing two classic synths, details below:

This is the comparison I think most of our friends have been interested in. Our Sequential Circuits Prophet 5 is a revision 3.2 and has factory midi. It’s in incredibly good condition and has been calibrated fully, thus the tuning tends to be a lot more stable than on unserviced Prophet 5′s. Because of the MIDI interface we have been able to send the same MIDI sequence from the MPC 2000XL to both the Prophet 08 and the Prophet 5 simultaneously. Both synths were recorded straight into Pro Tools HD via a Precision 8 mic pre and a 192 HD IO audio interface.

Unlike the Oberheim OB 8 comparison, getting patches to sound similar between the Prophet 08 and the Prophet 5 was a lot more work. It felt many times like chasing a moving target–you would modify one synth a little and then bounce to the previous one to get it closer … so on and so forth. However, we were again surprised by the Prophet 08′s ability to get remarkably close to the general tonal characteristic of the infamous Prophet 5.

A couple of observations became apparent during the comparison: it’s very very obvious that the Prophet 5 uses analog components. The VCO’s move around a lot more, especially on held chords and it’s not a linear movement. Even with programming, the Prophet 08 has a more predictable frequency movement. We used the slop function set to the max and it still wasn’t quiet enough to get it close.

Also, this can be observed with envelope times as well. The Prophet 5 feels like each voice is somewhat discrete and exhibits slightly different envelope times for each stage (i.e. ADSR). I’ve simulated this somewhat by routing sample and hold to modulate the envelope stages on the Prophet 08 but it still feels somewhat “obvious” as a programming trick rather than the true discrete voicing as on the Prophet 5. That is not saying anything bad about the Prophet 08, but rather, that the 08 is a lot more precise (digital envelopes vs CEM3310…) in this department than the 5.

The UNISON mode on both synths is very very different. On the 5, it sounds a lot more dialed in especially considering gain staging whereas on the Prophet 08, provisions have to be taken to bring the VCA envelope modulation down so as not to create internal clipping. It also feels like the envelopes work differently on the 08 when in UNISON mode than on the Prophet 5. This is not a comment regarding legato/non legato modes but rather the “feel” of the envelopes themselves. However, I have heard commentary that the 08 unison is like the unison mode on the Roland Juno 106, and as a former user of a 106, I can safely say that it is nothing like that. It’s just a different feeling unison mode that requires a little bit more work on the programming end.

We hope you enjoy this comparison. It was a lot of fun to record and program this.

Time machine: SEQUENTIAL CIRCUITS DRUMTRAKS Vintage Drum Machine 1984

May 22, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Demo of the drum machine Sequential Circuits Drumtraks from 1984.

It is a great American drum machine. It is very flexible – for every beat and every sound in a pattern you can set volume and pitch to your needs, similar to the E-mu SP-12. It has a groovy sequencer! One of my favourite drum machines.

It is a studio machine with single outputs for drumsounds, MIDI, Clock IN/OUT and more…

sci_drumtraks

The DrumTraks is a very programmable classic drum machine from the eighties. While its electronic drum kit sounds may not be as popular today as the TR-909 or TR-808, the DrumTraks exceeds them with superior editing capabilities. Thirteen drum sounds all with programmable tuning and level control. Extensive editing with copy and paste ability. There’s even a mixer section for individual sounds, six individual outputs, one mono mix output, and cassette in/out for offline memory storage.

Pretty basic and easy programming, record a couple patterns and link them into a song. The DrumTraks can output a 24PPQN clock signal and is also fully MIDI capable. This makes it very easy to use with old analogs and new MIDI synths and sequencers. If your looking for classic eighties electro beats and the vintage instrument that generates them then look no further than the DrumTraks.

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