Sequential Circuits Prophet 600

March 3, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

A demo with the SC Prophet 600. Drumcomputer Roland TR 808.
As usual a multitrack recording with some FX.

The first commercially available synth to implement MIDI!! It’s a fun synth. Its big brother is the legendary Prophet 5. The P600 is very affordable today and is a great buy. Models with the newest software will enjoy polyphonic MIDI implementation and up to 100 memory patches to store their own sounds! The sound of the Prophet 600 is brighter and harsher than that of a Juno 106 but still just as funky.

The P600 has two oscillators per voice with sawtooth, triangle and variable pulse waveforms. The oscillators can be individually tuned or synced together. Similar quality VCF and VCA sections from the Prophet 5 can be found here too! The P5′s Poly-Mod section has also been passed onto the P600.

The P600 is extremely versatile and easy to use! Its best functions include the onboard arpeggiator, 2-track sequencer and poly-modulation. The P600 is great for creating analog effects, swells and drones. It has a cool glide effect and has very flexible modulation possibilities!

Time machine: Sequential Circuits Pro-One

January 26, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Vintage synthesizer demo track by RetroSound
“N°1″

all sounds: Sequential Circuits Pro-One Analog Synthesizer from the year 1981
drums: Roland TR-808 synced with the Pro-One Arpeggiator
recording: multi-track without midi
fx: a little bit delay and reverb

for me one of the best monophonic analog synths ever. perfect for basslines and fx sounds.

more info: http://www.retrosound.de

The Pro One was basically Sequential’s attempt at taking their legendary Prophet 5 poly-synth and packing it into a compact, inexpensive, monophonic analog synth! It has two VCOs, a great 4-pole lowpass filter, two ADSR envelopes (one for filter), and a compact three-octave keyboard. With a Pro-One, you can easily create punchy analog bass-lines and leads or quirky analog synth effects.

The Pro One is an extremely flexible synth with lots of modulation possibilities (ie: the filter, VCO B and LFO can modulate VCO A or B frequencies or pulse widths, or the VCF). There’s also an onboard sequencer, something common on many Sequential synths but not often found on other monosynths of the time. It is very basic, however, storing only two patterns and up to 40 notes max. Also, only pitch info is recorded (and in step time only); you can not assign a note duration to any notes. So it’s basically a short melodic sketch-pad…but useful. Also onboard is an arpeggiator which has UP and UP/DOWN patterns.

Antique Synthesizer 1970-1979

November 18, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

All you can eat vintage synths on this nice Sunday morning, featured gear listed below:

MOOG Minimoog / ARP Odyssey / KORG MS-20 / E-MU Modular System / MOOG System 55 / Sequential Circuits prophet-5 / Oberheim SEM / Oberheim OB-1 / RML ElectroComp 100 / Roland-SH-2 / KORG 800DV / EMS Synthi AKS / YAMAHA CS10

Time machine: Sequential Circuits Prophet VS “1986″

November 18, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

The Prophet VS uses Vector Synthesis as its revolutionary new means of sound creation. It uses a total of four oscillators per voice with 127 waveforms (32 user) and dynamic waveform crossfading via the joystick. This was Sequential’s first digital synth, and it was also their final synth unfortunately. But after Sequential was gone, Vector Synthesis technology went into the popular Korg Wavestation and Yamaha’s SY-22 and TG-33.

Synthesizer demo track by RetroSound “1986″

all sounds: Sequential Circuits Prophet VS Vector Synthesizer from the year 1986
drums: Roland TR-707
recording: multi-track without midi
fx: a little bit delay and reverb

this track at my soundcloud channel: http://soundcloud.com/retrosound-ii/sci-prophet-vs-1986

Time machine – Sequential Circuits Pro-One

August 15, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

The Sequential Pro One is a wicked little monosynth! It comes from the same period and genre as the Roland SH-101 and Moog Prodigy. The Pro One was basically Sequential’s attempt at taking their legendary Prophet 5 poly-synth and packing it into a compact, inexpensive, monophonic analog synth! It has two VCOs, a great 4-pole lowpass filter, two ADSR envelopes (one for filter), and a compact three-octave keyboard. With a Pro-One, you can easily create punchy analog bass-lines and leads or quirky analog synth effects.

The Pro One is an extremely flexible synth with lots of modulation possibilities (ie: the filter, VCO B and LFO can modulate VCO A or B frequencies or pulse widths, or the VCF). There’s also an onboard sequencer, something common on many Sequential synths but not often found on other monosynths of the time. It is very basic, however, storing only two patterns and up to 40 notes max. Also, only pitch info is recorded (and in step time only); you can not assign a note duration to any notes. So it’s basically a short melodic sketch-pad…but useful. Also onboard is an arpeggiator which has UP and UP/DOWN patterns.

“A voyage into the heart of the SCI Pro-One from the year 1981. Exploration by Marko Ettlich

monophonic analog synthesis
2 Osc I Saw, Pulse, Square, Sync, Noise
Filter – 24dB lowpass
Crossmodulation, FM
step sequencer, arpeggiator

It has been used by Prodigy, Depeche Mode, Vince Clarke, New Order, Soft Cell, Sigue Sigue Sputnik and many more.”

Gear and synth pictures form Vince Clarke’s studio

August 8, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

The I Dream of Wires crew checkod out Vince Clarke’s new Brooklyn studio in July 2012. Above: Vince Clarke and Jason Amm (Solvent) contemplate The Roland System 700…check out the huge sequencer!

Vintage Emu Modular on the left and ARP 2500 in the background

Oberheim SEM wall, OB-1, Xpander, Sequential Circuits Prophet-5 & more in the background.

Remaining pictures can be found here >>

Time machine: Sequential Circuits Prophet VS

April 26, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

A voyage into the heart of the SCI Prophet VS from the year 1986.
Exploration by Marko Ettlich

Here’s a very cool keyboard from Sequential. Notice the joystick for controlling your sound modeling. The Prophet VS uses Vector Synthesis as its revolutionary new means of sound creation. It uses a total of four oscillators per voice with 127 waveforms (32 user) and dynamic waveform crossfading via the joystick. This was Sequential’s first digital synth, and it was also their final synth unfortunately. But after Sequential was gone, Vector Synthesis technology went into the popular Korg Wavestation and Yamaha’s SY-22 and TG-33. The ProphetVS is still a very sought after instrument because it has an incredible range of sounds! Its only problem is that there’s practically nobody left that can fix it if something went wrong.

Sequential Circuits Prophet VS “In Balance”

April 8, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Vintage synth demo track by RetroSound

The Prophet VS uses Vector Synthesis as its revolutionary new means of sound creation. It uses a total of four oscillators per voice with 127 waveforms (32 user) and dynamic waveform crossfading via the joystick. This was Sequential’s first digital synth, and it was also their final synth unfortunately. But after Sequential was gone, Vector Synthesis technology went into the popular Korg Wavestation and Yamaha’s SY-22 and TG-33.

All synthesizer sounds in this video: SCI Prophet VS
recording: multi-track
fx: a bit delay
drums: Roland TR-808

Steal that sound!

September 22, 2011 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Hal Leonard Books has published Steal This Sound by Mitchell Sigman. Presented by Keyboard Magazine, the book is a collection of Sigman’s columns of the same name from Keyboard, detailing the greatest synth sounds from the greatest records, and how they can be achieved with modern gear.

Presented in chronological order as they appeared in the magazine from inception to the present, Steal This Sound includes more than sixty articles describing prominent synth sounds from Prince’s “When Doves Cry” and Nine Inch Nails “Closer” to MGMT’s “Time to Pretend” and Radiohead’s “Everything in It’s Right Place”.

Hal Leonard Books PR officer had this to say, “Steal This Sound is packed with invaluable tips and insights into re-creating these great synth sounds and provides a unique view into how synth technology has evolved over the years. Sigman explains how these sounds were created originally on synths by Moog, ARP, Sequential Circuits, Roland, and Korg, and gives step-by-step instructions to re-create the sounds using widely available modern plug-ins and software instruments from a host of manufacturers. Steal This Sound is a great read for music enthusiasts and an invaluable resource for keyboardists and programmers.”

About the Author:
Mitchell Sigman is a Los-Angeles based keyboardist, guitarist, and producer. His band Celebutante plays the LA area and has numerous TV track placements in shows such as The Jersey Shore, The Bold and the Beautiful, Burn Notice, Monk, and more. Sigman also won a BMI award in 2008 for his work on the Berlin track “Scream”, which is used as the theme song for the Lifetime drama Angela’s Eyes. Sigman has been a writer for Keyboard Magazine since 2004.

 

Pricing and Availability:
$19.99

More information:

Vintage synth demo – Split Eight in action

July 24, 2011 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Around 1983-84 Sequential Circuits, in order to break into the Japanese market, shipped the Curtis SENTE (CEM 3394) chip and the firmware for the Sequential Six-Trak to an other Japanese manufacturer. It was their plan to have that that manufactuer design a synthesizer more targeted at the Japanese buyer. This Japanese company created an 8-voice bi-timbral version of the Six-Trak. They added a 5-octave, 61-note (C-C) keyboard to it and sold it in Japan, calling it the Pro-8. Sequential, liking what the Japanese manufacturer had done with their design and worrying that they might market their synth with one of their competitors (ie. Korg), asked for some design changes and a name change, and sold the Japanese-made synth as the Split-8.

The Split 8 makes for a very nice programmable polyphonic analog synthesizer with complete MIDI implementation. With 8 voices and 8 oscillators (Curtis 3394 SENTE chips) the Split 8 is a heavy contender against the Roland Juno-106! However programming the synth, while straight forward and intuitive, is limited to adjusting one parameter at a time assigned to one Data knob. This limits performance ability but is no problem during studio use.

The keyboard features splits and layers, all of which can be saved with patch data. Choose between 8 voice polyphony with 1 oscillator per voice, 4 voice polyphony with dual oscillators per voice, 2 voice polyphony with a mega 4 oscillators per voice, or the unison mode which is just a fat 8-voice solo mode for trance bass and lead heaven! Similar to the Juno-106, the Split-8 uses a Chorus effect to liven up the sounds. Sonically the Split-8 sounds much ‘thinner’ than a Roland Juno-106, however this ‘thin’ sound is characteristic of Sequential and is quite nice.

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