Vector – a new way to interact with a modular synthesizer

December 11, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Vector – a new way to interact with a modular synthesizer that’s a bit like a theremin on steroids.

Vector is a three dimensional control interface designed for Eurorack modular system. It senses the location of a hand over its face and outputs a signal proportional to position for each axis: x (left and right), y (up and down), and z (in and out).

Vector works by generating an electrical field and sensing changes in it causes by the proximity of your hand. Think of it as a smartphone screen with an added dimension of depth four to five inches from the surface. The system uses six electrodes to form the active sensing area. The sensing electrodes are part of the circuit board which lays just behind the piece of acrylic.

This allows you to control three things at one time, like turning three knobs all at once by moving your hand through the air. You could control the amplitude of a sound with the x axis, the pitch with the y axis, and the modulation of that sound with the z axis.

hack-me-vector

LED Feedback

To provide feedback, Vector has LEDs ringing its active sensing area. These LEDs light up according to the location of your hand.

Vector lights red for the z axis and blue for the x and y axis. As you get closer to the surface, the red LEDs get brighter. As you move closer to a location on the x-y axis, the blue LEDs in that region get brighter and those farther away get dimmer.

Gesture Recognition

Vector can also recognize a number of simple gestures. It recognizes swiping gestures, as well as circular motions over its surface. These gestures can be used as trigger outputs and for interacting with the built-in looping feature. Vector provides a menu system that uses gestures to change the system behavior.

Looping

Vector can record up to 30 seconds of position and gesture data for looping playback. Simply press the large illuminated switch to start the loop and release it to end it. The loop plays back immediately.

The loop can be retriggered with swipe gestures or by external signals from a module with trigger outputs. Vector records as long as the switch is held down, so long rhythmic sequences can be recorded by moving a hand in an out of the active area.

The loop switch can also be used as a sample and hold control. When pressed quickly, it freezes the hand position to lock in the output. The loop playback can be sped up or slowed by using circular gestures, clockwise for faster, counter-clockwise for slower. The loop recording can also be triggered externally. One pulse starts the recording and the next pulse ends it. Using external triggers to start and stop recording as well as to synchronize the playback, you can make perfectly synchronized loops.

Vector is being developed as a Kickstarter project, with the controller available to early supporters for $299

More info here >>

Analog Delay MF-104M & Analog Modular System Tinysizer & MFB-Tanzbär

December 11, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

No external effects! Recorded with Ableton Live

Synth Demo – Installing Kilpatrick Format Modules

December 10, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

This video explains how modules are installed and removed from the Kilpatrick Format system. The unique chassis design makes rearranging modules quick and easy. You will also learn how to power a module outside the chassis for calibration purposes.

C7 Curved Eurorack Cabinet

December 5, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

C7: C-shaped cabinet – first try out just after finishing this eurorack enclosure
more info at: http://www.creativegallery.nl/

Synth Kit Introduction – littleBits x KORG

December 4, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

MAKE SOMETHING THAT MAKES MUSIC

littleBits and Korg have demystified a traditional analog synthesizer, making it super easy for novices and experts alike to create music.

LEARN MORE:
English: http://littlebits.cc/
Japanese:http://jp.littlebits.com/

littleBits gives you “Light-up Party Jacket”

December 3, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Instructions at http://littlebits.cc/projects/light-u…

Be the life of the party or create your own with this light-up jacket!

littleBits makes an open source library of electronic modules that snap together with magnets for prototyping, learning, and fun. Find out more at littleBits.cc

New December series: 12 days of Modular 2013 – Day 1 Wavetables

December 2, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

First in a series of 12 videos during the month of December. Each video’s music started with a different foundation of Modular Sounds. This video began as an exploration of wavetables. Sound and Video by Raul Pena.

PATCH IT- “The Intermission Patch”

November 29, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

A multi-part segment of improvised patching. “The Intermission Patch” is aptly named due to it acting as an intermission during the regularly scheduled Doepfer A144 series. Stay tuned for a completed version later this month. For now some patching. Sound and Video by Raul Pena.

Metal Music from littleBits

November 28, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Recreate metallic sounds with the envelope!

littleBits makes an expanding library of modular electronics that snap together with magnets. Bits modules are just the beginning. Combine them with craft materials, building sets, and other toys to electrify your life. Find out more at littleBits.com

Electronic music artist Solvent on a Eurorack jam w/Modcan Dual Delay

November 25, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Hello my name is Solvent and I enjoy making spontaneous aggro eurorack jams like this. This was all sequenced with an MFB Urzwerg, with 3 channels of CV going into the Modcan: Mix CV, Filter CV, and the key to what you are hearing here, the Delay CV.

Other modules used: Flight Of Harmony IMP, Intellijel Dual ADSR + uVCA, Frequency Central Vogue VCF, Blue Lantern Asteroid BD, hexinverter.net batteryACID (I Dream Of Wires edition)”

Brief write up on Solvent:

Solvent_2010_686x320

For over a decade, Jason Amm’s work as Solvent has neatly defied categorization. His music is too sweetly melodic for techno or acid, his compositions too fiendishly detailed for synth-pop. He was too steeped in the sounds of the ‘80s to participate in the incipient IDM scene; he was briefly lumped in with the short-lived electroclash movement, only to outlive it; he’s played “minimal wave” parties and goth clubs, indie-rock shows and techno all-nighters. But even as words fail in the face of Solvent’s music, its pleasures are anything but elusive.

Today, Zimbabwe-born Jason Amm lives in Toronto, ON, where he spends his time obsessively grappling with an outsized collection of vintage analog synthesizers, samplers, and sequencers. Solvent first materialized in 1997 with a string of singles and full-lengths (1998’s Solvent, 1999’s Solvently One Listens) on Amm’s own Suction Records, the Toronto-based

label he founded with Lowfish’s Gregory DeRocher. The watershed release Solvent City (2001) on Berlin-based Morr Music introduced Amm’s sound to a wider audience, and Apples & Synthesizers (2004) marked Solvent’s move to Ghostly International. Along with notable remixes of artists including Soft Cell, Alter Ego, and Adult., Solvent tracks have appeared on high-profile DJ mixes and seminal compilations.

Solvent’s most recent record on Ghostly International, 2010?s Subject to Shift, marks a turn for the darker as Amm embraces his love of the abrasive sounds of acid and industrial. And while a sinister tone or two now dances among Solvent’s sparkling hooks and bright streaks of synthesizer, and while Amm’s music drifts even further from accepted genre-specific reference points, Solvent’s sound has only deepened. After more than ten years of composing love songs for robots, Amm sounds like nothing more than himself. (via Ghostly)

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