Serge From Melodic to Krellodic

November 22, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

‘djangosfire’ has been experimenting with a semi-diatonic TKB patch on the Serge, details below:

Thought of a pretty weird idea:

- take the “KV” voltage out and patch it into the scaleable inputs of 2x VCO’s.
- scale the VCO inputs so that you have a semi-diatonic octave.
- THEN add a single row CV out from the TKB (I used row A)… patch it to the 2x VCO’s
- tune each step of row A out to bring the sum of the KV output CV to = a more accurate diatonic step.

Also, by patching the TKB “Reset” to different stage inputs … I created sub loop sequences that have a pretty, kind of doppler tuned sound…. since when you are not holding a stage pad, the TKB is transmitting ONLY the scaled KV output.

I need to fully notate this one.

And finally, I wanted to make a quick improv video that shows how easy it is to take a pretty sound into chaos…….. “Krellodic” AKA melodic Krell :)

Thanks for listening!

Time for battle – Serge vs Buchla

October 9, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Benge rocks some modulars, details below:

vintage Serge and Buchla 100 modular synths swinging together. See http://myblogitsfullofstars.blogspot…. for more

Serge and Synthesizers.com modular synthesizer

June 23, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Kosmische Musik style with Synthesizers.com modular synthesizer

A Serge Modular Creature + Gator patch

Serge Modular Sounds 10

June 10, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Background video description:

The WAD was in a very sedate mood today, so I used it as a standard rhythmic delay. Delay A to out (center), delay B to the Frequency shifter with Up and Down outs panned hard left and right.

Modular synthesizers: Serge Creature TGO Demo

May 13, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

As there didn’t seem to be too many basic demo’s of Serge modulars, ‘pjoris2′ tries here to document his discoveries of Serge. He’ll start with the most recommended “starter” M-class pannel: the Creature; and more specifically with the basic noisemaker in there: the Voltage-Controlled Timegen Oscillator (TGO). All noises are made with +/- only the TGO. X-Fader used as output, and sometimes the SSG als LFO. An overview of the video:

Basic Functions of the Left Oscillator (Osc 1)
(00:05) Saw wave output
(00:20) Square wave output
(00:30) Frequency modulation using variable CV input
(01:10) Audio-rate frequency modulation
(02:00) 1V/Oct CV input
Basic Functions of the Right Oscillator (Osc 2)
Trigger on (to the right)
(02:15) Triangular wave output with variable rise and fall
(03:00) Frequency modulation using variable CV input
(03:30) Pulse output, varying frequency and duty cycle
(04:30) Demonstrating trigger switch
Trigger off (to the left)
(04:45) Triggering Osc 2 with pulse out of Osc 1
(05:00) Depending on the relative settings of Osc 1 & 2, the frequency of Osc 2 is now controlled by Osc 1. We can vary now Rise & Fall without changing the pitch of the Osc 2 output.
(05:40) Now using the Pulse output of Osc 2: pulse width modulation.
Using Right Section as Filter
(06:00) Plug in saw of Osc 1 in the lower Sig In (black jack). The Rise pot changes filter cutoff. The Fall pot only makes signal more quiet.
(06:30) Filter cut-off modulation using the VC in of Osc 2.
(07:30) Audio-rate filter cut-off modulation
Saw of Osc 1 in Input of Osc 2 and Trigger On
(08:00) Filtering was with Trigger Off. Now see what happens with Trigger On for Osc 2. No idea what it does, but sounds interesting …
(08:40) Adding frequency modulation of Osc 2.
Feedback on Osc 2
(10:00) Feedback the output in the CV In: that way you get exponential (+ modulation) and logarithmic (- modulation) slopes
(11:00) Feedback of the output in the Sig In. No idea what this is.
(11:30) Add an LFO to the CV in. Even more noise.
(12:00) Certainly if you take the modulation into audio frequencies !
And finally: some more feedback:
(12:45) Osc 1 out in Osc 2 Sig In, Osc 1 Pulse in Osc 2 Gate in, LFO in Osc 2 CV in.

Serge TKB Controlling Oberheim SEM and Moog Voyager

September 1, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Routing separate sequences to separate analog synthesizers in different formats the Serge tkb oversees all control voltage tracking tasks. These sounds were created and tweaked live.

Additional info about the Serge:

A few words about Serge sequencers. Note that Serge/Sound Transform does not make a traditional keyboard like you see on most other synthesizers, such as Moog, Roland, etc. You can get a traditional vintage control voltage keyboard (Roland, Moog, Polyfusion, etc.) and interface it to the Serge, since the Serge adheres to the 1 volt/octave standard. Or you can generate a control voltage from your MIDI keyboard and an interface.

Sound Transform follows the Buchla model of offering a touch sensitive keyboard/sequencer unit, as well as more traditional simple sequencers. Originally, they offered a sequencer whose stage was selected by push buttons. This is what’s called a sequencer-programmer: you could use it in an automatic mode as a traditional sequencer, or use it manually to select/program voltages you set. So you can mimic a traditional keyboard if you want by tuning each stage to various notes. Or discard the traditional keyboard concept and simply use it to fine-tune different parameters in your patch for later recall.

The TKB is the hub of the sequencers – each stage has a corresponding output that goes high when it’s selected. This complements the other sequencers, which have an input that, when high, causes that stage to be selected. So the TKB can be used to control another sequencer, or whole sets of other sequencers, regardless of the number of stages they might have.

Sound Transform offers a set of Serge sequencing programmers, from four to eight stages, plus the Sequencer with eight stages, and the TKB with sixteen stages. Confused? What they call their regular Sequencer is not a sequencing programmer in that each stage is selectable by a button but not by a stage select input. The sequencing programmers have stage select inputs. And the TKB has stage select outputs.

The sequencers are a little ‘bare’ in that none of them have an internal clock. You must use another module as a clock source, and typical sources are the DSG, DTG, and the Smooth section of the SSG, patched to oscillate. But they do have cute features such as step trigger inputs for RESET, UP/DOWN, and HOLD.

Most of the Serge sequencers are optionally available with an internal connection to a quantizer. Why would you want that? The quantizer forces the range of the stage pots into stepwise note intervals. So as you turn the pot, it isn’t a continuous rise or fall, but steps up and down a scale. This makes tuning much easier and more reliable. The variable outputs are still available on quantized sequencers also.

Serge 1 – First test of system

August 18, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Here’s a new video featuring a Serge modular:

“This was the first sounds made on my system. Recorded 10 minutes after plugging it in. I have no idea what is going on, but it sounds nice.”

Serge Modular ADSR pitch modulation

February 7, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Serge Modular synthesizer doing crazy pitch slides and controlling a Moog Voyager through CV.

Checking out the Serge iPAD Control

January 29, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Serge modular controlled from an iPAD running TouchOSC.

Wholetone scale with 4 x sliders controlling FM pitch / FM amount / filter cutoff / envelope scaling.

www.ianboddy.com

About Serge:

The Serge synthesizers are the creation of French electronic/synth designer Serge Tcherepnin. They are analog modular systems that began production in 1974, and continue to be produced to this day. The Serge concept was that a powerful, musical and great sounding analog modular system could, unlike the Buchlas, Moogs and ARPs of the time, be smaller, more compact and most importantly: cost less, making them far more accessible to musicians looking to jump into the bold new world of electronic music and sound design.

Although Serge was French, the modular systems that bore his name were orignally designed and produced in Los Angeles, CA. Initially designed in 1974 (in Serge’s home), mass production of the systems began in 1975 and continued until 1986. There was a rough period between 1986 to 1993 where modules were still produced to special order (slowly), but full production resumed again in 1993 after Serge’s circuit designs were sold to Rex Probe (an early collaborator) who went on to found Sound Transform Systems, who continue to produce many of the original Serge modules, plus a few new one’s of their own design.

Influences of the Buchla can be seen in Serge systems, such as touch sensitive keyboards & sequencers, random voltage generators, function generators, and matrix mixers. Yet the Serge has many unique designs of its own such as the Wave Multiplier module and the use of banana plugs in lieu of traditional patch cords. Its filters are unqiue sounding but it may be the Wave Multiplier module that truly sets a Serge apart as it is a totally unique synthesizer section that sits between the Oscillator and Filter sections and allowed for external audio or control voltage signals to be used to modulate the timbre of the oscillator’s tones.

Originally, Serge systems were custom built to order. Like any modular system a buyer would pick and choose individual modules they want and assemble them into a cabinet. However, to reduce the price tag and make them more accessible to musicians not interested in building a modular synth from scratch, Sound Transform Systems sells Serge systems in pre-configured systems: Shop Panels and the M-Class.

Focus on the Serge Modular and iPad Drum app DM1

November 25, 2011 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

http://thissecondsleep.blogspot.com/
Serge Modular and IPad Drum app DM1. Please listen with headphones.

DM1 is an advanced vintage Drum Machine. It turns your iPad into a fun and creative beat making machine.
Easy and fast to use, loaded with 40 superb electronic drum kits and beautiful hyper-realistic graphics, DM1 has been designed for a lot of instant fun.

As electronic musicians ourselves, we, at Fingerlab, have developed DM1 with the intention of delivering the perfect mix between fun playability and powerful sonic capacities. We always keep in mind the importance of a beautiful design with the right balance of powerful abilities while avoiding clumsy, overbusy interfaces.
Check our 40 electronic drum kits. 18 classic vintage drum kits plus 22 in-house produced electronic kits, edited and mastered at Fingerlab professional studio.

DM1 offers 5 main sections:
1 – THE STEP SEQUENCER frees your imagination with a smart use of the multi-touch screen. Just turn on and off steps in your sequence with the tip of your fingers to create cool beats, or unexpected rhythms!
2 – THE DRUM PADS simply lets you play and record the beat that tickles your fingers. No need to be a first-class drummer, automatic quantize does the work for you.
3 – THE MIXER for quick and subtle sound mixing of your drum kits. Featuring settings for volume, pitch, sample length, custom drum kit element for each channel, mute and solo mode.
4 – THE FX TRACKPADS a creative duo of FX trackpads to distort, modulate and transform your beats. The effects include: Overdrive, Delay, Phaser, Texturizer, Robotizer, Filter and Compressor.
5 – THE SONG COMPOSER allows you to quickly make a song with the beat patterns you have created. Just drag and drop the patterns onto the timeline. Fast and easy.

Specifications:
✔ Graphic design by Jonas Eriksson
✔ Smart ergonomy for fast creativity and fun
✔ 40 vintage and produced drum kits, mastered at in-house Fingerlab Sound Studios
✔ Mixer page with pitch, length and level rotary controls, pan controls, and custom drum kit per channel
✔ Extra fast drum kit loading
✔ Playable pattern selection for extra creativity
✔ 9 Big Drum pads, quantized recording and pitch-bend ribbon
✔ Step Sequencer with multi-touch matrix
✔ Duo FX Trackpads for real-time sonic destruction and multi-FX
✔ Mode song with intuitive editing
✔ High-quality export to email or iTunes shared folder
✔ Audio background mode

In development:
✔ WIST
✔ AudioCopy export
✔ Samples import
✔ MIDI

Get it here >>

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