OSA (Old School Arps) for Kontakt

June 24, 2014 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

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CL-Projects releases OSA (Old School Arps) for Kontakt 5.1 and higher.

Here’s what they say: “Imagine yourself in a cellar, filled with vintage synthesizers and analog sequencers, flashing lights, knobs and faders everywhere, playing Berlin School electronic music. If you don’t have any of that equipment to your disposal, this library is the next best thing. It tries to bring some of that sound and feeling to your home and studio by supplying vintage arpeggio patches.”

The Berlin School electronic genre of music was first made in Berlin in the 1970s, hence the name, by electronic music artists like Tangerine Dream, Klaus Schulze and Ashra. Typical for this type of music are the evolving, atmospheric and hypnotic layered sequencer textures. The sound consists basically of ambient elements combined with short, repeating sequenced runs of notes, which gives the music a rhythmic element.

OSA is a Kontakt 5 library aimed at this genre of electronic music from the 1970s and 1980s and consists of vintage arpeggios, and a few modern ones too. Inspired by musicians like Jean Michel Jarre, Tangerine Dream, Klaus Schulze, Michael Hoenig and countless others.

Library Features:

  • For Kontakt 5.1 and higher (Full version).
  • 24-bit 44.100 kHz ncw samples.
  • 50 different waveforms per oscillator.
  • 24 samples per patch, 12 per oscillator (76 notes).
  • Velocity and Aftertouch responsive.
  • 6 folders containing a total of 151 patches.
  • Patches divided into Straight, Triplets and One Shot (separate folders).
  • 4 Effects: Reverb, Delay, Chorus & Phaser.
  • Time and Speed parameters sync to Host tempo (Delay, Chorus and Phaser).
  • All parameters on 1 page.

Price: £19.99.

More info on the OSA product page: www.cl-projects-sound-design.com/osa

arp meeting

June 2, 2014 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

A small ARP ditty. A nice way to chill out after a late nite gig…

http://myblogitsfullofstars.blogspot….

ARP Odyssey sound design tutorial Ultravox

April 25, 2014 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Vintage synthesizer sound tutorial series by RetroSound

part two: the agressive synth lead sound from the new wave group Ultravox.

very important is the oscillator sync function and the pitch modulation.

unfortunately it came to a few disturbing noises during the recording. the output level was a bit too high for the electric mistress guitar pedal

ARP 1601 Sequencer clone demo

April 15, 2014 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

A direct clone of the Arp 1601 sequencer.
Added an LFO which has a clock sync input. The LFO is based on Electric Druid’s work.
A quick and dirty demo. Excuse some of the language…

Korg to develop a new ARP Odyssey

February 17, 2014 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 


KORG INC. is proud to announce that a faithful recreation of the legendary 1970s analog synthesiser, the ARP Odyssey, is being developed by Korg for release later in 2014.

The ARP Odyssey was released in 1972 by ARP Instruments, Inc. and quickly became famous for its unique rich sound and innovative performance controls. It was a staple for many recording and performing musicians worldwide and was used on countless hit records over many years. The Odyssey was one of the highlights of the ARP company and became a long selling product. With slight updates and improvements it was sold through to 1981.

Korg is also proud to welcome Mr David Friend as our chief advisor on the Odyssey. David Friend established ARP Instruments, Inc. along with Alan Robert Pearlman and is a past president of ARP Instruments, Inc. He was also the lead designer of the original Odyssey in addition to designing or co-designing many other products.

After ARP, Mr Friend became a successful technology entrepreneur. In 2010, he was named Ernst & Young Entrepreneur of the Year in the Emerging Technology category for the New England Region, he has been a lecturer at MIT’s Sloan School of Management and is now Chairman & CEO of Carbonite, Inc. He has been a trustee of the New England Conservatory and Berklee College of Music.

In the last few years, KORG INC. has released several top selling analog synthesizers such as the monotrons series, the monotribe, the volca series and the hugely successful MS-20 mini, a faithful fully analog recreation of the 1978 MS-20. With Korg’s technology capabilities and planning ability for analog synthesizers, and in collaboration with David Friend, we believe the legendary ARP Odyssey will become a “must have” for an all new generation of music makers.

The ARP Odyssey is scheduled for release in September 2014. – See more at: http://www.korg.com/us/news/2014/0217/#sthash.E2XWNMxZ.dpuf

ARP Odyssey Sounds For Reason

January 31, 2014 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

 

Binary Music has announced that they are now supporting Reason’s NN-XT with some Refills for Reason -ARP Odyssey, Valve 4 Op and Crosswave.

 

  • The ARP Odyssey Refill contains 101 NN-XT patches made from over 1,400 samples.
  • Valve 4 Op is a collection of samples from a Yamaha TX81Z – 65 patches for NN-XT and 47 Combinator patches.
  • The Crosswave Refill contains 133 NN-XT patches of an Ensoniq SQ80.

Pricing and Availability:

Pricing is £11 – €13 – $15 for the first week, thereafter £17 – €20 – $23, including VAT in EU.

More information:

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Bucha and Arp 2600, Robotspeak SF

November 3, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

This is what happens when you put a Buchla modular and an Arp 2600 together. At the Modular Synth Meet at Robotspeak in San Francisco.

 

Early ’80s Italo Electro with SH-1000, ARP Omni-2, Juno-60 and TR-808

October 17, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

The beauty of analog synthesizers.

Fat sounds from a classic synth – Arp Odyssey

October 16, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

This is a short demo of the ARP Odyssey’s sound and synthesis capabilities. This Odyssey is a late mk1 model. It has a gritty and present sound.

While the Minimoog proved to be a runaway success as the first compact studio synthesizer, ARP responded with a compact and user-friendly studio synthesizer of their own with the Odyssey in 1972. An almost equally legendary machine itself, the Odyssey was ARP’s highest selling synth back then, and still is to this day in the second-hand market.

The Odyssey essentially gives you a simplified hard-wired ARP 2600 in a much smaller and affordable package. The Odyssey is a 2-oscillator analog synth (with duo-phonic capability) and it sounds really nice; the Minimoog has three oscillators and is capable of thicker sounds. The Odyssey comes well equipped with all the tweakable features and analog goodness you’d expect: a resonant low pass filter, ADSR envelopes, sine or square wave LFO, and a sample-and-hold function.

First came the Odyssey Mk I (Model 2800) produced between 1972-75. These used a smooth but tinny sounding 2-pole voltage-controlled filter design (model 4023) similar to those used in the Oberheim SEM modules. From 1972 to 74 the Odyssey was produced with a white-faced front panel with black lettering. During 1974 to 75 they switched to a redesigned black front panel with gold lettering. However, all Mk I’s can be identified by the rotary knob they use for pitch bending. None had any interface jacks, but a factory modification was available to add interface jacks as well as a PPC pitch bender in place of the rotary knob.

Boomstar 4075 sequenced by Doepfer Dark Time

October 10, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

This is a demo of the Boomstar 4075 (ARP 2600 filter) being sequenced by a Doepfer Dark Time. Because of the nature of the demonstration, it could get a little boring during some sections. Pay attention to the subtle changes and you will be impressed. Stay tuned through the whole video to see how much range the Boomstars can cover. This is only a short segment as well, these synths are capable of much more. This is a Perfect Circuit Audio favorite of 2013!

Look out for another Boomstar demo coming soon, this time played by a MIDI controller.

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