Unsound Krakow festival: Future Shock

July 16, 2011 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Unsound has announced the central theme for this year’s Krakow festival: Future Shock!

Unsound will take the bestselling 1970 book by futurist Alvin Toffler as the starting point to create a program exploring ideas of the future from the past. Via performances, screenings, talks and installations, Unsound Krakow will also reflect upon key “Future Shock” ideas such “information overload” – a phrase popularized by Toffler. His examination and prophetic description of the disorientating effects of an accelerated rate of technological and social change will serve as a jumping off point for a wide range of musical and non-musical work to be presented in Krakow.

The festival is to take place between October 8th and October 16th, with October 13th – 16th as the key days including John Foxx & The Maths, Sun Araw, Laurel Halo, Deaf Center, Cut Hands, Sex Workers and Ital!

Please check out the documentary above on the Alvin Toffler book Future Shock, it’s a must see for all retro techno futurists!

Here’s another future inspired song:

Make sure to to checkout Herbie’s synths including the forgotten Rhodes Chroma.

Dataflux

June 15, 2010 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Dataflux, created by Kit Webster is a wonderful installation with synchronized sound and images. The visuals are projected on seven pillars, and the sound greatly enhances the experience of movement. Dataflux has some resemblance to Minus 60° by Karl Kliem. Again I cannot help thinking of Ryoji Ikeda’s work when watching this video, also because of the name, as it’s very similar to Ikeda’s Dataplex. For Dataflux Webster created software that renders the visuals live.

Kit Webster will be one of the artists at this year’s Liquid Architecture festival in Australia taking place in June and July.

Future tech music

May 19, 2010 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

This is a pretty nice piece of recap on the progression of next gen musical instruments.

The intersection of music and technology is a wild, fascinating frontier. Ever since the first computer-synthesized sounds were created, people have struggled and succeeded — to varying degrees — to reshape how we think about musical instruments.

Today, thanks to innovators such as Ray Kurzweil and Robert Moog, we have a wider range of digital music machines than the inventors of keyboard instruments could have ever dreamed.

But innovation didn’t stop there. Drum machines, music-making software and even mobile phones now compose melodies, thanks in a large part to the men in this video. One of the creations included in these demos is the LinnStrument

Check out this showcase of futuristic instruments and the philosophies of those who make them, and let us know what you think about the future of musical instruments in the comments.

Manipulate sounds by moving glowing blocks

January 11, 2008 · Posted in Electronic Music · Comment 

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0h-RhyopUmc]

The reacTable, a new instrument that lets musicians manipulate sounds by moving glowing blocks on a round, transparent table, is wowing festival audiences after it was hand-picked by Björk for use on the singer’s summer tour.

The modular synthesizer mashes up shades of Tron, laser hockey and classic Moogs using open-source reacTivision software and an under-the-hood camera to track blocks that, when added, rotated or moved, combine to produce beeps, whoops and soaring synth lines.

The reacTable‘s developers say it is the latest in an emerging wave of “tangible music interfaces,” but to the touring musicians who play the thing, it’s merely “cool.”

Each block has a different function — like changing a sound wave’s amplitude or acting as a metronome — that is denoted by a unique hieroglyph. Players move, rotate and flip the blocks, run their fingertips over the tabletop’s surface and alter the blocks’ proximity to each other to control the music produced by the machine. Pulsing visuals that light up the tabletop come courtesy of a projector beneath the reacTable’s translucent Perspex surface, making the instrument interesting to the eyes as well as the ears.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QVVULBXvmxk]

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Have a nice weekend

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