Time machine: YAMAHA SK-10 String Machine 1979

March 16, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Synthesizer Demo of the analog synthesizer/string machine YAMAHA SK-10.

The SK-10 was introduced 1979 by Yamaha, Japan. It is the smallest instrument of the Yamaha SK-series.

yamaha_sk20

Yamaha’s SK-series are combo-keyboards with synthesizer, organ, brass and string sections. The SK-10 was the first of the SK-series, released in 1979 – the SK-20, 30 and 50D followed in 1980, and the SK-15 in 1981, possibly as a replacement for the SK-10. The SK-10 is the only one in the series that does not incorporate a synth section, but has organ, brass and string sections that can all be played together for more interesting combinations. Very sturdy casing, 4-octave and fully polyphonic the features also include a leslie simulator, vibrato, attack and sustain rocker switches, a slider for ‘brilliance’ and a one-octave transpose switch. Not exactly feature-laden, but a lovely string synth sound. Interestingly, they are often referred to as ‘analog’, but in fact do have a digital section. Its organ has one of the early implementations of Yamaha’s FM technology in a very limited form, concurrent with the GS-1/2 development platforms which eventually led to the DX series.

The ORGAN SECTION is available in all the SK series synthesizers. It offers a full range of stop levers from 1′ to 16′, percussion levers with adjustable decay, and controls for overall sustain, brilliance and decay. This gives you quite a lot to work with in the way of synthesis. The organ’s sound is FM based and it sounds very B3 like. You can add a Vibrato and a noisy but good Tremolo to it. Its sound is all about the 70′s era rock organ, especially with the Ensemble chorus effect in use. It also has a Leslie-speaker output around back.

The PRESET STRINGS section isn’t very sophisticated and offers very limited editing capabilities. It is the string section though, that is worth aquiring this keyboard for.

All the different sections of the SK synths can be layered and stacked via the slider bars. You use the slider bars as a mixer to set the individual volume for each section. All sections have their own separate audio outs (though a mix out is also available). A great thing for live performances is the split keyboard mode. That way you can have, for example, a very nice, punchy bass sound from the synth section and a lead sound coming from the organ or solo sections. Although it has no patch memory, there are push buttons for instantaneous selection of organ, poly-synth and string preset sounds; there are three presets in each section. It also, has no arpeggiator or sequencer, and lacks MIDI. But it’s cheap, easy to use, has a nice sound, full 61-note keyboard, and classic wooden panels.

Time machine: FARFISA SOUNDMAKER Analog Synthesizer 1979

December 27, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

“Synthesizer Demo of the analog synthesizer/string machine FARFISA SOUNDMAKER. I played the Soundmaker with a Roland DC-30 analog delay. The Farfisa Soundmaker came out 1979. It looks a bit like a Synclavier :-) It has a string section, a “poli” section and a monophonic synthesizer section. The keyboard has aftertouch. Also it is possible to run the polyphonic section through the filter of the monophonic section – like seen in the last part of the video.”

farfisa_soundmaker

Built in 1979-81, the Soundmaker has Synth, String and Piano/Brass Sections. The Monophonic Synth section has 12 preset sounds (Tuba, Trombone, Trumpet, Sax, Clarinet, Oboe, Flute, Piccolo, Violin, Accordion, El Bass, El Guitar) and one Free patch which lets you use the controls to create your own sound. Basic controls for the filter, the one ADSR for the filter and/or the VCA, and the LFO are laid out plain and simple.

The Polyphonic Preset Synth section has Volume & Brightness controls for its four preset Piano type sounds (Piano, Electric Piano, Honkey Tonk, Brass).

The String section offers a fairly decent string sound with Volume, Brightness, Attack and Sustain controls for a choice of two preset strings (8″ footage or 4″ footage).

The Soundmaker is a bulky synth, weighing in at 27kg! Its keyboard may be split (at middle F only) and the Strings and Poly Synth sections play with the left hand and the Mono Synth plays with the right hand. The keyboard also has polyphonic aftertouch which can be used to control the Mono Synth Brilliance, OSC (vibrato), Synth Glide or Brass Brilliance. The String and Poly Synth sections can be switched to monophonic at the same time. The Farfisa is not the best String Machine you’ll ever hear, but it is very rare and that alone gives these machines some serious vintage appeal.

Vintage Synthesizers – Logan String Melody II

December 12, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

A voyage into the heart of the Hohner (Logan) String Melody II from the year 1979.
Exploration by Marko Ettlich (RetroSound)

fully polyphonic analog string keyboard made in Italia
three basic sounds: Violin, Viola and Cello + Bass and Perc
ensemble effect
49 keys

used by The Twins, Neuronium, Yello and more

About the Logan:

The String Melody is an Italian string synthesizer from Logan Electronics, first released in 1973. At first, success was lukewarm as Logan Electronics was relatively unknown. But in 1977 a slightly updated ‘mark II’ model was released and Logan Electronics began to see some commercial success from the sales of this instrument. As a result, almost all String Melodies floating around out there today are the ‘mark II’ version, as the original is quite rare. Also of note: outside of Italy, the String Melody was distributed by Hohner International, so you will find them labeled either the Hohner or Logan String Melody.

There are three basic sounds available: ‘Violin’, ‘Viola’ and ‘Cello’. These three sounds are actually all the same sound, just in three different octaves. The keyboard is permanently split in the middle, with the lower half called Bass and the upper called Treble. There are three drawbar volume sliders for each of the three sounds in the Bass region (the red sliders), and another three sliders for the three sounds in the Treble region (the blue sliders). This allows you to mix in as much of each sound in either section of the keyboard as you want for some really customized string combinations!

But wait, there is more! There are another two additional sounds on-board: ‘Bass’ and ‘Perc’. These sounds are only available in the Bass region of the keyboard (the yellow sliders). The name of the ‘Perc’ sound is a little misleading though, as it is still a bass string sound—it’s just that it is a percussive sub-bass sound with a fast attack.

The only other control sliders are for two sets of Attack and Release (called ‘Sustain’ on the String Melody). One set controls the Bass region and the other allows for independent control of the Treble region. In back there is a single 1/4 inch mono audio output and a volume control pedal input. But that is it—no CV or Gate options here.

On the ‘mark I’ there is a button called ‘Orchestra’ which acts sort of like an ensemble effect Preset, recalling its own mix-levels and attack/decay settings in which all the tone sliders are at full volume. This is where the ‘mark II’ version differs from the original—it added four new ensemble effect Presets: ‘O’, ‘ACC.’, ‘SOLO’, and ‘ORGAN’. You must have at least one of these effect Presets on at all times – it uses those old-fashioned push buttons where engaging one button disengages whatever button was previously engaged, so at least one button is always engaged. The ‘O’ setting is a subtle chorus effect. The ‘ACC’ (Accordion) is the closest thing to no ensemble effect, leaving the strings sounding their driest. ‘SOLO’ is a vibrato-like effect with some chorusing. ‘ORGAN’ is a really nice chorus that’s almost phaser-like.

The String Melody is a pure string synth, and has a really great sound. Being Italian, it sounds quite different from similar types of string synths from Roland (Japan) and ARP (USA), and many would say the String Melody has the best sound of them all! It may not have as much editable flexibility as the others, but it sounds so good—it truly does what it was meant to do, and does it just right! It is built into a durable heavy flight-case with wood paneling, a handle, and even a cover! Considering that it is a niche instrument, they seem to maintain a relatively low second-hand market price. Which means if you can find one, you’d better jump at the chance to acquire it, because samples still can’t beat the real thing! (Via VSE)

Vintage Synthesizers I Crumar Performer

December 9, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

A voyage into the heart of the Crumar Performer from the year 1979.
Exploration by Marko Ettlich (RetroSound)

fully polyphonic multi keyboard made in Italia
one oscillator for brass (square wave) and two oscillatos for the strings (8′ and 16′)
one LFO with delay length, rate and depth
analog low-pass with resonance for brass and 3-band equalizer for strings
49 keys

used by Duran Duran and more

The Performer is a polyphonic analog Strings and Brass machine produced at the end of the 1970′s by the Italian synth company. It is slightly compact with just 49 keys. But it is fully polyphonic – you can play all 49 notes simultaneously! Programming is simple and clearly laid-out with just 15 sliders and a few buttons. A solid black chassis and wood end-cheeks round out this classic and often overlooked string machine.

The Performer is best remembered for its Strings. A simple 3-band equalizer with high, mid and low sliders can be used to give the strings shimmering sparkle or moody dark timbres. The Strings section uses two oscillators per voice with 8′ and 16′ settings. Simple Attack and Sustain sliders give you some control of your string’s envelope settings.

The Brass section is less exciting. It uses a single oscillator with just a square wave to generate a weak Brass sound. It has a low-pass VCF filter with resonance, but it too is pretty weak. Simple Attack and Decay sliders control its limited envelope settings too.

The LFO is pretty nice, with delay length, rate and depth control. It can modulate both Brass and String sections and can be routed either to the VCF or pitch. There are three outputs on the back: main output, brass output and signal output (for external processing) as well as CV and Gate connections.

Euro bow interface prototype

November 17, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Peter Speer demonstrates his DIY Euro Bow Interface – a unique bowed string instrument he uses with his Eurorack modular synthesizer.

Technical details below.

Hollow laser cut MDF enclosure, with a guitar string pulled across two zither pins and a contact mic underneath (connected to the front jack).

Bow is homemade, too (2×4 + horsehair).

Pressure Points and the Wogglebug’s Stepped Out (triggered by the Pressure Points) are controlling the frequency on the DPO, as well as the pitch shift on the Echophon. The envelope out from an A-119 is opening the low pass gate on the output and controlling the modulation index on the DPO.

Time machine: Vintage Synthesizers I Roland VP330

November 6, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

A voyage into the heart of the Roland VP330 Vocoder Plus from the year 1979.
Exploration by Marko Ettlich (RetroSound)

vocoder, human voice choir, analog strings
separate mix levels for all sections
stereo chorus effect
49 keys

used by Vangelis, Kitaro, Laurie Anderson, Mike Oldfield, Styx, Ultravox, Genesis and more

One of the coolest instruments out there. The vocoder shapes its envelope and filters by any sound source fed into it, your voice or even a drum loop can be used which is then applied to another sound source, typically a synth pad. This creates a very unique and famous robot-like sound.

Aside from the 10-band vocoder, the VP-330 added a string synth section, choir and a human-voice sound, both of which are quite excellent themselves. Its 3 sound sections offer a few different presets that can be slightly edited with de-tuning and vibrato. The VP-330 is one of the best Vocoder synths ever and although there are many other types of Vocoders, none sound as good as this!

 

Three Vintage Analogue String Synthesizers

October 21, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Analogue synths can’t synthesize every sound, but the attempts made to replicate the sound of orchestral strings were so successful that so-called string machines became much-loved instruments in their own right.

CRUMAR MULTIMAN String Machine 1975 + Gerd Schulte Compact Phasing A

October 7, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

In the first half of the video ‘AnalogAudio’ plays the Crumar Multiman dry, in the second half with a COMPACT PHASING “A” from Gerd Schulte Audio Elektronik. The Compact Phasing A is a German phaser, which was well known in the seventies (at least in Germany). Many units were sold, but it is rare and sought after today. It was used by Klaus Schulze, Tangerine Dream, Kraftwerk and others.

This Crumar Multiman is the first version (later came the Multiman S versions which are larger). It was produced in Italy. It has a string section, a brass section (with VCF controls and resonance) and a piano section. It is capable of nice layer sounds. A monophonic bass preset can be added.

“Excuse the crackling noises, my Multiman is not 100% intact. Indeed, it is in terrible shape. Some of the keys don’t play notes, instead they produce some crackling noises. But the basic sound is fantastic!”

Introduction into Image Line’s Sakura

August 13, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Here’s a 12 part video series featuring the new product from Image Line (FL Studio) – Sakura

“Image-Line brings you ‘Sakura’, the string physical modelling instrument, to express the delicacy and beauty of stringed sounds.”

Description:

Sakura can reproduce the delicate pluck of a single string, a violins bowing or the sonorous resonance of a grand piano. Most importantly, the curious musician can take control of every aspect of the simulation to create fantastic instruments. Ever wanted to know what a 20 foot guitar sounded like? Or a bowed piano? Now you can find out, Sakura opens up a world of string modelling possibilities, why not download the Sakura demo and try it for yourself. The Sakurazensen is coming, be there to experience it.

More info here >>

Exploring String Machines from UVI© – Product Overview

July 3, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

UVI String Machines is a digital hybrid instrument, forged with the analog imprint of the 11 most musical string synths ever built. Accessible, expressive and fully editable, rediscover all these authentic sounds used in several cult records!

http://www.uvi.net

Download • http://bit.ly/string-machines_download
Buy DVD • http://bit.ly/string-machines_DVD

Further info, photos & audio demo • http://bit.ly/uvi-string-machines

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