Unleash the Beast – Bit Beast Synth Demo

February 11, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

A demo song of the Bit Beast synthesizer. All sounds (including drums) are made with the Bit Beast and recorded into Ableton Live. Some minor FX were added to some tracks (reverb, delay, EQ).

The Bit Beast utilizes a method of tone generation commonly called ‘bit banging’. It turns a digital bit on and off at the frequency of specific notes. This method of creating sounds is typical of old videogame and computer systems. The processor that reads the MIDI signal and ‘bit bangs’ the notes is the same one used by the Arduino UNO (ATMEGA328P-PU). All the code is written and compiled in the Arduino software. This means that anyone with an Arduino UNO can edit and tweak the code. This will allow musicians to customize their synth to some degree, and expand upon the base functionality.

bitbeast_med

The notes are then chopped up and processed using CMOS logic chips. The effects created are common in the DIY realm, but seldom available in commercially available synthesizers.

The sound then passes through two analog voltage controlled filters. Both filters are unique designs that offer very different sounds. Filter 1 is a 12db state variable filter with low-pass and band-pass modes and overdrive control. Filter 2 is a 6db filter with low-pass and high-pass modes and a squelchy distorted resonance. The filters can be configured in parallel or two different serial configurations. Both filters have their own LFO and envelope generator.

The final step that the sound passes through is an analog VCA with a dedicated envelope generator.

More info on the Bit Beast here: http://www.joviansynth.com/bit-beast.php

The Bit Beast is not currently in production. The estimated cost is about $500-$600. Please send us an email if you would like to be notified when more information and availability is known – info@joviansynth.com

The Bleep Drum

February 8, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Arduino based drum machine with adjustable samples and loop sequencing.
Available February 8th from bleeplabs.com and Sparkfun.com.
All audio direct from The Bleep Drum.
Transdimensional hand modeling provided by the HSS3jb (not hooked up to the Bleep Drum).

Specs:

  • Four sounds, two with pitch control
  • Four selectable sequences
  • Record patterns just by playing them
  • Tap tempo
  • Reverse mode
  • Hyper Noise 30XX mode

http://bleeplabs.com/store/the-bleep-drum/

Bleep Labs Thingamagoop modulated by Arduino with accellerometer

February 5, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Reactive Music Experiment.
Accelerometer on springy stalk flashing led to modulate sound from Thingamagoop .

The Thingamagoops are really just simple, analog type synthesizers that you control in a different way. The Thingamagoops have oscillators just like any synth. On analog synths the oscillator that creates the actual tone you hear is called a VCO or voltage controlled oscillator. The Bleeps work a little differently so we’ll just call it the main oscillator. Instead of using a keyboard, the main oscillator in the Thingamas is controlled by a photocell. Here’s what the waveform from the main oscillator looks like.

When there is a lot of light hitting it, the resistance across the photocell goes up and the oscillator yields a higher pitch. Less light lowers the resistance and pitch. When the switch on the right is up, the oscillator is in a high range and when it’s down it’s in a lower range. One neat thing about the photocell is that it reacts to different kinds of light. Florescent lamps and TV screens give the Thingamagoops a harsher tone while natural and incandescent light produce a cleaner one. Just like any analog synthesizer, the thing-a-ma-s have another oscillator that effects some variable. This is usually called a modulator or LFO. Here the modulator’s waveform is pretty close to a square wave.

The modulator’s frequency is controlled by the knob and the type of modulation is selected by the switch on the right. When the switch is up the modulator is effectively turning the output of the main oscillator on and off. This yields a simple beep beep beep at lower frequencies but at higher frequencies sidebands are created. Sidebands occur when the modulator is oscillating inside the audible range . This creates new frequencies that are multiples of the oscillator’s frequencies.

When the modulator switch is down, the modulator is changing a variable in the LEDacle’s circuit. Now you have some control over its rate of blinkatude. The LEDacle is a modulator too but instead of adjusting knobs and switches to change how it interacts with the main oscillator, you physically move it around to effect the sound. The light from the LEDacle can be pointed at the photocell to rhythmically change the pitch. Not only can you use the speaker inside the Thingamas to listen to crazy beeping nonsense, you can also use the 1/4inch ouput jack to plug it up to all kinds of things. Plug it into some guitar effects and an amp for some indescribable electronic madness.

Monotron Filter controlled by Arduino

December 7, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

The cut-off frequency of the Korg Monotron analog low-pass filter is controlled by an Arduino micro controller and a DAC chip.

^ [xor] synth – prototype

November 17, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

This video features a prototype of a new synth called XOR and is actually a true digital polyphonic synthesizer, details below:

thanks to Tim Barrass for the amazing Mozzi library
sensorium.github.com/Mozzi/
Arduino programming compatible – running on atmega 328
open source
standuino.eu/devices/instruments/xor-synth/
based on fraAngelico synthesizer
Features:
-MIDI Input
-polyphony 6 voices
-velocity sensitive
-selectable wavetable (sine,saw,triangle,noise)
-selectable bitoperator that modulates the wave (xor, or, and)
-overflow distortion
-envelope
-lfo
-presets

Random Walk Generator Demo (ArdCore, Kraftzwerg, & A148)

October 28, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

The Snazzy FX ArdCore is a Eurorack module based around the Arduino microcontroller. You can create programs (a.k.a. sketches) on your computer and upload them via USB into the module.

For this video, ‘chisel316′ loaded the Random Walk Generator sketch into the ArdCore and use it to modulate the VCOs on the Kraftzwerg. Also in play in this patch are the Kraftzwerg’s Dual cross-modulating LFOs and the Doepfer A148 Sample and Hold module.

“As you can see, I started expanding my modular setup. I’ve been collecting modules that I feel compliment the Kraftzwerg.”

The Beer Cans Keyboard Movie

October 23, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Do you have any idea of what you get if you combine 44 beer cans with an Arduino board and a Raspberry PI ?

We will tell you : fantastic user engagement!

We did this at Webstock, event which took place in Bucharest in September. Staropramen, one of the sponsors of the event asked us for an innovative way to offer a trip to Prague to one of the event’s guests.

So, we came up with a keyboard made out of 44 Staropramen beer cans. Each beer can was a key, and whenever someone touched it, the corresponding letter appeared on a large plasma screen (just like any regular computer keyboard).

And the surprise was fantastic! The user experience and engagement overcame any expectation. Every single person who attended Webstock tried the keyboard and participated to the contest.

Behind the scene, the system is built around an Arduino board and a few capacitive controllers (just like the ones which are inside smartphones’ touch screens), connected to a Raspberry PI board which controls the plasma screen display.

A movie and some photos took during the event can be found here -
robofun.ro/create/beer-keyboard (feel free to use them if you want).

Webstock is the biggest blogging and social media event in Romania. Find out more about Webstock here – webstock.ro .

Robofun Create is a Romanian company specialised in creating cool on-demand technology products. Find out more about Robofun Create here – robofun.ro/create .

Skube – A Last.fm & Spotify Radio

September 17, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · 1 Comment 

Rethinking home audio and understanding how and where people share music was the jumping point for creating Skube. We are moving more towards a digital and online music listening experience, current portable music players are not adapted for this environment. And sharing music in communal spaces is neither convenient nor easy, especially when we all have such different taste in music.

The result of our exploration is Skube, a music player that allows you to discover and share music and facilitates the decision process of picking tracks when in a communal setting.

It is a fully working prototype through the combination of using Arduino, Max/MSP and an XBee wireless network. We access the Last.fm API to populate the Skube with tracks and scrobble, and using their algorithms to find similar music when in Discover mode. Then using Applescript, we get Spotify to play the music. We use XBees for the wireless communication between the each Skubes and to the computer using custom software that manages all this.

For more information, please check out the blog post: soundplusdesign.com/?p=5516

Project by:

Andrew Nip – cargocollective.com/andrewnip
Andrew Spitz – andrew-spitz.com
Ruben van de Vleuten – rubenvandervleuten.com
Malthe Borch – ciid.dk/education/portfolio/idp12/students/malthe-martin-borch/

As part of the Tangible User Interface module at CIID ran by Vinay Venkatraman, David Cuartielles, Richard Shed, and Tomek Ness.

Music:

Artist – Kirsten & Marie
Track – My Dear
Album – Discover the Sound of Denmark

rePatcher : modular-synth interface for your computer

September 16, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

The rePatcher is an Arduino shield that gives you a hardware interface
to control and “repatch” your Pure Data and MAX/MSP patches
It has 6 general purpose potentiometers for modifying parameters in your patch
and a 6 x 6 patchbay matrix

rePatcher made by
http://www.openmusiclabs.com/projects/repatcher/

wiki:
http://wiki.openmusiclabs.com/wiki/Repatcher

Arduino MIDI controller accelerometer/gyro test

August 29, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

A demo of some Arduino programs that Amanda Ghassaei has produced – that use an accelerometer and gyroscope for tilt/motion sensing
more info about it on Instructables:
instructables.com/id/Use-an-Accelerometer-and-Gyroscope-with-Arduino/
All LED, button, and MIDI processing is being done by the Arduino, MIDI out was sent to and recorded in Ableton.

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