Spectral – new synthesizer instrument plugin from LinPlug

November 26, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

linplug_Spectral_thumb

LinPlug has announced the release of Spectral, a new synthesizer instrument plugin for Windows and Mac.

If you are familiar with subtractive synthesis, you will feel right at home with the Spectral, because you can choose an oscillator waveform, choose a filter shape and go on from there.

But Spectral delivers far more options than you would expect from the well sorted user interface. Both Oscillator Waveform and Filter Shape can be edited in depth. The unique audio engine is capable of delivering many sounds never heard before.

Spectral features

  • Four Oscillator and Filter modules with powerful yet detailed harmonics and filter band editing and modification functions.
  • Extensive Oscillator and Filter audio rate cross-modulations..
  • Versatile Arpeggiator with in depth editing of every step, including length, transpose, voice number and Glide.
  • Each Oscillator and Filter with own dedicated envelope to control its volume or frequency respectively.
  • Additional 3 freely assignable Modulation Envelopes..
  • Five LFOs with various waveforms, up to 320 Hz, tempo-sync, poly-, mono- and one-shot-mode, unipolar and bipolar options, integrated delay-attack-envelope, phase, symmetry and smoothing adjustable.
  • 15 slot Modulation Matrix with 35 sources and more than 100 destinations including all important parameters.
  • Fully recognizes Velocity, Aftertouch, Pitch Bend , Modulation-Wheel and various other MIDI controllers.
  • A sophisticated effects section containing 15 Effects including various Delays, Chorus, Phaser, Filter, Reverb, Flanger, Gator, Stereo Enhancer, Parametric EQ and Crusher.
  • Glide / Portamento featuring mono/polyphonic operation, constant Time / Rate operation, Auto-Bend Modes and detailed options on where Glide takes place.
  • 32-voice polyphony (CPU and sound program dependent) and adjustable voice limit.
  • Supports AU and VST hosts on Mac OS X and Windows PC.
  • Scaleable user interface on PC.
  • Comes with 850 presets to get you started.

Spectral is available to purchase for the introductory price of $99 USD until December 31st, 2013 (regular $149 USD).

More info here >>

Listen to the sounds of Oberheim OB-Xa

November 25, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

All synthesizer sounds: Oberheim OB-Xa Analog Synthesizer (1981)
drums: Roland TR-808
recording: multi-tracking
fx: reverb and delay

The Oberheim OB-Xa was Oberheim’s overhaul of their first compact synthesizer, the OB-X. The OB-Xa was released in December 1980, a year after the OB-X was released. Instead of discrete circuits for oscillators and filters, the OB-Xa (and the Oberheim synths to follow) switched to Curtis integrated circuits. This made the inside of the synth less cluttered, reducing the labor required to replace bad parts, and reducing the cost of manufacture. However, today it’s much easier to fix an OB-X than an OB-Xa, as Curtis parts are getting scarcer, whereas discrete parts used in the OB-X are almost always readily available.

Aside from hardware changes, the OB-Xa had better interface features than the OB-X. These included being able to split the keyboard into two halves with different voices and the ability to layer voices to create thicker sound (essentially making two notes sound for every key pressed). Polyphony stayed the same – again 4,6 and 8-voice models were offered.

One function that did disappear from the OB-X voice architecture was cross modulation, or frequency modulation of the first VCO with the second VCO. When done with analogue circuits, it’s a unique sound made famous by the Sequential Circuits Prophet 5 and its poly-mod section. The lack of this feature somewhat reduced the range of sounds possible on the OB-Xa.

WIN a limited edition Synthesizer! :)

November 23, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

The Youtube alias ‘The Tuesday Night Machines’ wanted us here at SBC to share his video and the opportunity to win a White Noise Synth, details below:

WIN one rare Standuino 2pi White Noise Synthesizer! Just subscribe to my channel and post a comment underneath this video, briefly telling me which of my other videos you like (or dislike) and why.

Subscribe here:
http://www.youtube.com/subscription_c…
Watch my other videos:
http://www.youtube.com/user/flx04/videos

At the end of November 2013 I will choose one random comment and send its user a private message, to hash out all the shipping details. MAKE SURE YOU GET YOUTUBE MESSAGE NOTIFICATIONS! :)

Watch a demo video for the 2pi White Noise here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-qF1l…

For more information on the Standuino 2pi, check out their website:
http://www.standuino.eu/musical-instr…

New Reason tutorial featuring additive sound design with Parsec

November 22, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Try Parsec now: http://shop.propellerheads.se/product…
Download the .reason song file (requires Reason 7): http://cdn.propellerheads.se/products…

The Parsec Spectral Synthesizer is a sound designers dream. With two independent sound engines, up to 1024 oscillators per voice, a wide range of sound sculpting tools, built-in effects and free modulation routing, Parsec is capable of an incredibly wide range of sounds.

In this tutorial, product specialist Mattias shows you how to create a beautiful bell sound from scratch. If you want to go deeper with Parsec, this video is for you.

Turn your iPhone into a motion-controlled instrument – AUUG Motion Synth

November 21, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

A new project, AUUG Motion Synth, explores the possibilities the iPhone and iPod touch, converting the devices into wearable motion-controlled instruments. Using it, you can control iOS synths, desktop music apps and even hardware.

auug-motion-synth

The platform is made up of three components:

The AUUG grip positions the screen of an iPhone or iPod touch to be played by the fingers and secures the device to the user’s hand during motion: The AUUG app converts your iOS device’s motion sensor data into signals for shaping sound, and transfers these signals to other iOS sound apps or external devices. The AUUG app does not produce its own sounds, but instead acts to control other iOS audio apps running on the same device (as well as external devices). The AUUG app can be installed on iPhones (4S and up) and iPod touch devices (5th generation and up). The AUUG cloud is online service at that allows AUUG app presets to be shared with other users, via your iPhone or iPod touch (no laptop or desktop needed).

Background video information:

VISIT OUR KICKSTARTER CAMPAIGN: kck.st/1efP3Rf (ending Dec 19, 2013)

facebook.com/auug.motion.synth

VIDEO MUSICIANS AND CONTENT:

Introduction soundtrack: The second half of the video (2.12 to 4.17 mins) includes looped sections of ‘Silver Wheel’ (from the ‘Solar Driftwood’ album) by Australian band Cracked Actor crackedactor.com.au.

Samuel David Graeme [holyeucharistline.com]: (0.16 to 0.21 mins) ‘Animoog’ synth app running on same device.

Sonia Vaikyl: (0.22 to 0.33 mins) ‘Magellan Jnr’ synth app running on same device.

Video sample: The ‘video scrub’ demonstration (0.34 to 1.01 mins) by Joshua Young uses a 2 second clip of Evalena Marie [evalenamarie.com] from the independent feature film ‘Visionary’ [facebook.com/visionarymovie] directed by Ben Proulx.

Eesha Hunjon [youtube.com/channel/UCzatgvFHc7_coVeH2Tq1Klw]: (1.02 to 1.15 mins) ‘Audiobus’ app (hosting Harmony Voice and Garageband apps) running on same device, with mic input via iRig Pre.

Becki Whitton [facebook.com/aphirism]: (1.16 to 1.31 mins) ‘Audiobus’ app (hosting Magellan Jnr app) running on same device, with mic input via iRig Pre.

Adam Cook [adamjamescook.com]: (1.46 to 2.03 mins) Nord Stage 2 keyboard, with MIDI input via iRig MIDI.

Joshua Young [auug.com]: (0.00 to 0.15 mins) ‘Animoog’ synth app running on same device; (0.34 to 1.01 mins) AUUG ‘video scrub’ software running on laptop; (1.32 to 1.45 mins) Voice Live Touch 2, with MIDI input via iRig MIDI. The backing track (0.00 to 2.03 mins) each musician composed and performed their parts to and the motion-reactive visuals were also created by Joshua Young.

Process: The video musicians used the backing track as a basis to compose their own parts and performed them live during filming, while simultaneously controlling the motion-reactive visuals behind them (via Wi-Fi MIDI messages sent from the AUUG Motion Synth to laptop software and back-projected onto the screen behind them). Their estimated practice times can be found at auug.com/musician-composition-and-practice-time.

Nitroflex – new virtual synthesizer instrument for Windows

November 20, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

synthblitz_nitro

Synthblitz has released version 1.8 of the Nitroflex synthesizer instrument for Windows.

Nitroflex is a powerful, feature packed virtual synthesizer that is well suited for professional music producers, enabling them to create unique waveforms.

The new version introduces 2 new LFOs, 300 new presets for a total of 1024, and other new features.

Changes in Nitroflex v1.8

  • 300 new presets for a total of 1024.
  • 2 new LFOs for a total of 3 LFOs.
  • Added in “edit” panel “single cycle waveform from disc”.
  • Fixed “waveform random generator”.
  • Adding controls for multiplication and subtraction (in edit panel).
  • New “Output” for create 3d sound.
  • New “Options menu” in the principal panel.
  • New Vibrato setting (vibrato attack,delay,speed,range,velocity and more).
  • The main panel has been modified to simplify access to functions.
  • Solved the problem in Cubase (preset recall).
  • Added new LP filter.
  • Added 80 new waveform files in the folder.
  • interpolation and normalization of each waveform before and after the mathematical operations.

Nitroflex is available to purchase for 49 EUR.

Get it here >>

Demo featuring the WALDORF MicroWAVE XT – Relaxing Ambient Chillout Music

November 20, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Waldorf Microwave XT synth demo — playing a relaxing, dreamy ambient electronica music soundscape on Microwave XT wavetable synth from Waldorf. HEADPHONES HIGHLY RECOMMENDED! :)

This relaxing ambient chill-out / new age synthesizer music was created using 2 wavetables, arpeggiator, delay, filter/envelope adjustments, LFO modulations, and more.

Performed LIVE, no external processing! Everything you hear is from the Waldorf MicroWave XT (10 voice) digital wavetable synthesizer! :)

Time machine: ROLAND D-70 Digital Synthesizer 1990

November 16, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Taking a closer look at the vintage synth Roland D-70, video details below:

I played the Roland D-70 without any additional effects or eq. All you hear is coming straight out of the Roland D-70.

The fully digital Roland D-70 employs a LA (Linear Arithmetic) sound engine. It contains samples which can be filtered with lowpass/bandpass/highpass filters. The oscillators can be modulated via DLM (differential loop modulation). This can produce weird sounds, like heard in the video. A pity, that the JD-800 does not have this feature. It also has a multi effect processor built in (reverb, chorus, delay…). It has TONE PALLETE sliders, which help a lot to tweak the sounds.

In my opinion, the D-70 is more a “live performance synth” than a studio synthesizer. That’s the reason why a rack version never appeared.

The D-70 is very complex. But not exactly the synthesis engine – rather the performance functions: splits, MIDI functions, controller maps, master keyboard functions and that sort of things…. but I must admit, sometimes it sounds beautiful.

It was used by Michael Cretu (Enigma, Sandra).

Roland Juno 60 single synth demo: The Lost Weekend

November 11, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

All sounds from the Roland Juno 60, no midi.

The Roland Juno-60 is a popular analogue 61-key polyphonic synthesizer introduced by Roland Corporation in 1982 and a successor to the slightly earlier Juno-6. Like its predecessor, the Juno-60 has some digital enhancements, used only for clocking the oscillators and for saving and loading patches. This instrument was succeeded by the Roland Juno-106 in 1984. Roland was losing market share with the Juno-6 in competition against the Korg Polysix. Related in features and price-class, the Polysix featured external control and patch memory, which the Juno-6 lacked. These features were quickly added to the Juno-6′s design, which sonically and architecturally did not change notably between the two versions, and then released as the Juno-60.

The Juno-60 synthesizer is a six-voice polyphonic synthesizer. The single digitally controlled oscillator (or DCO for short) per voice gave the Juno-60 a high degree of stability in maintaining tune; most analogue voltage-controlled oscillators (VCOs) of the time would tend to drift in pitch and require re-tuning of the oscillator. The DCO provides sawtooth and square/pulse waveforms as a sound source, in addition to white noise and a square-wave suboscillator pitched one octave beneath the key played. Both of these additional sources can be mixed in with dedicated sliders.

The filters and envelope on the Juno-60 rely on control voltages sent by depressing the keys on the keyboard and were thus analogue. The Juno-60 features a rather distinctive-sounding 24 dB/octave lowpass filter with resonance. Unlike other VCF’s of the day, the Juno-60′s is capable of self-oscillation and thus could be used to some degree as a tone generator in and of itself. The filter section also features controls for envelope amount and polarity, LFO modulation, and keyboard tracking. In addition, a three-position non-resonant highpass filter is provided to thin out lower frequencies.

The signal is then sent through a voltage-controlled amplifier (or VCA) and a simple four-stage ADSR filter envelope.

The Juno-60 provides limited options for modulating the audio signal. A single triangle-wave variable-rate LFO is provided as a modulation source; this can be mixed into the DCO to create vibrato or into the lowpass filter to generate a tremolo effect. The LFO can either be triggered manually by the left hand using a large button above the pitch bend lever or set to engage automatically whenever a key was pressed.

Vintage exploration: Roland Jupiter-6

November 10, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

The baby brother of the Jupiter-8. Still a pretty great machine, with an awesome arpeggiator and the cool Jupiter sound.

Italo-Disco style live improvisation with JP-6, TR-707, SH-101. Leveraging the power of the JP-6′s sweet sounding multi-mode filter
Roland Jupiter-6 = BPF pad, portamento brass
Roland TR-707 = rhythm
Roland SH-101 = sequenced synth bass

The Roland Jupiter-6 (JP-6) is a synthesizer manufactured by the Roland Corporation introduced in January 1983 as a less expensive alternative to the Roland Jupiter-8. The Jupiter-6 is widely considered a workhorse among polyphonic analog synthesizers, capable of producing a wide variety of sounds, such as ambient drones, pads, lead synthesizer lines, and techy blips and buzzes. It is renowned for its reliability and easy, but sophisticated programmability.

The JP-6 has 12 analog oscillators (2 per voice), and is bitimbral, allowing its keyboard to be “split” into two sounds – one with 4 voices, and one with the remaining 2 voices (either “Split 4/2″ or “Split 2/4″ mode). “Whole Mode” is also available, dedicating all 6 voices to single (monotimbral) sound across the entire keyboard.

The JP-6 was among the first electronic instruments (alongside the Roland JX-3P and the Sequential Circuits Prophet-600) to feature MIDI, then a brand new technology. Sequential CEO Dave Smith demonstrated MIDI by connecting the Prophet to a Jupiter-6 during the January, 1983 Winter NAMM Show.

Europa, a popular firmware replacement available from ‘Synthcom Systems’ adds modern enhancements to the instrument’s MIDI implementation, user interface and arpeggiator, turning the Jupiter 6 into a contemporaneously adaptable machine

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