AIRA- Is Roland developing a new analog drum machine?

January 15, 2014 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Roland Engineers discuss the initial concept of the TR-808 which was conceived and built in 1980. Although it was designed to create “backing tracks”, creative musicians started to use the Rhythm Machine as an instrument and music changed forever. Now the evolution begins again.

Modular Wild presents SOUNDS-Tiptop 808 drums

December 17, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Exploring a Basic drum beat with TipTop Audio’s BD808, SD808, and HATS808 modules for that old school feel. Sound and Video by Raul Pena.© 2012 Raul Pena

Checking out the Audioid app for Android

November 12, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Just testing out the Audioid app for Android – includes a TB-303 and TR-808 emulation and effects.

AUDIOID is an advanced mobile electronic music rhythm composer for Android, combining the mythical TR-808 drum machine and the TB-303 bassline/groovebox with real-time filters, effects, randomness and a live approach.

FUTURE FEATURES
- Tap pad
- Bpm detector
- More effects (reverb, delay, chorus, etc…)
- More drum kits (909, 606, etc…)
- File save/load/export/import
- Equalizer presets
- A second TB-303 bassline/groovebox
- Better UI and better performance

FEATURES
- Sound quality 16-bit PCM at 44KHz or 22Khz
- Minimal latency supported by the device
- Linear and logarithmic knobs and bars
- Visual pitches synced with the tempo
- TR-808 drum machine style and sounds
- TB-303 bassline / groovebox
- Independent mixer levels for the drum machine, the bassline and fxs
- Independent levels, mutes, solos and fxs for each drums
- Memory of 4 banks of 8 patterns with 16 instruments containing 16 steps maximum each
- Memory of 4 banks of 8 patterns with 39 notes containing 16 steps maximum each
- Pattern edition (Copy, Clear, Cut, Paste, Randomize)
- Real-time effects (Flanger, Phaser, Distortion and Bitcrusher) with various parameters
- Audio FFT visualizer (waveform and frequency bands)
- Multitouch equalizer from -10dB to +10dB for each supported frequency band
- Low pass frequency filters from 1 Hz to 22kHz
- Fine and terribly efficient bass boost
- Presets can be saved and restored at any time
- Anti-clipping

MR-808 – mechanic drum robot

November 8, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Moritz Simon Geist created the MR-808 – described as ‘the first drum robot that reproduces the drum sounds of the 80′s. The installation is a version of the famous Roland TR-808 – but with robots playing the drum sounds!

Let’s get physical: MR-808 is the first drum robot that reproduces the drum sounds of the 80s – in the real world.
The robot installation MR-808 is a replica of the famous 1980s electronic drum machine TR-808 – with robots playing the drum sounds! I (Moritz Simon Geist) have been playing electronic music for several years now, and at some place I was bored of the electronic music production process. With binary logic, everything is possible.
So I decided to go back to the roots of sound generation – the physical sound generation – but combine it with the electronic music structure we like so much.
I liked the idea so much, that I couldn’t stop building my own drum robots, and ended up replacing all the electronic sounds of a whole drum computer, placed in a 3,3 x 1,7m² case. I am very proud to present the “MR-808” – a mechanic replica of the famous 1980s electronic drum machine TR-808!
Read on: sonicrobots.com/mr808-eng/

MR-808 – mechanic sound robot (all drums, miced)
A mechanic relay controlled via arduino (bass sound)
Gameboy – Arduinoboy hardware (8 bit chiptune sound)
Everything was programmed in Ableton, only equing and compression has been applied.

Filmography: David Campesino
Music: Moritz Simon Geist

Tutorial time: How to Make 808 Bass Kicks

September 21, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

New tutorial using the Reason DAW to produce the classic 808 bass kicks, details below:

http://ohdratdigital.com This week we’re looking at how to make a sound that’s never been unpopular, but is absolutely everywhere at the moment. Don’t rely on sample packs to create massive 808 style sub bass, do it yourself quickly and easily in a subtractive synth for an awesome sound!

Recreating Marvin Gaye’s 1982 electronic Soul ballad Sexual Healing using Logic

February 17, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Central to the groove is the Roland TR-808 drum machine – in fact, rumour has it that this was one of the first commercial hits to utilise the 808. Though the beat and groove sound simple, there’s a lot of syncopation so it’s essential to study the original beat. Try importing the track and slowing down the drum-only intro using Logic’s varispeed feature.

Read the full story here >>

How to Create a Tuned 808 Bass in Ableton

December 2, 2011 · Posted in Uncategorized · 1 Comment 

“Hello, AfroDJMac here with a tutorial and free Ableton Live Device Rack for you! This week I give you an Roland 808 bass drum sample that can be tuned to play in key with your song or as a bass line. The Roland 808 has some great low end on it and it makes for a nice instrument to create earth shaking bass sounds. At higher octaves this synth makes for a nice electric keyboard like instrument #bonus! ”

Download: http://bit.ly/freesynth36

The iconic Roland 808 drum machine is a staple in modern music.  Each sound is loaded with character and can be found across many musical genres.  This week I spent some time with samples of the heavy hitting bass drum.  The result is a Free Ableton Live Device Rack that allows you to play the bass drum like an instrument.  I’ve tuned the bass drum and spread it out over the keyboard to create a bass instrument that allows your bass drum to play in key with your songs and even play melodies.  To help give it some punch, I have fortified it with an additional 808 bass drum sample and a sample made with Ableton’s Operator.  These two layers add a more high end “click” sound to the bass drum notes, helping to round out the sound and add definition to the low end melodies.  In the accompanying video, I take you through how I created it, so you can mimic this idea with any sample you like, and then explain how the device rack is set up.  So get your subs out and get ready to shake the neighborhood as we dive in to some serious lo frequency madness!

Synth spotting: Above & Beyond – You got to go (Kebu remix)

October 10, 2011 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Here’s what Kebu has to say about the tune:

This is a remix I made for a competition. If you like it, please follow this link and vote for it by pressing “spin” (requires registration):
http://www.beatportal.com/remix/detail/ab-you-got-to-go-k…

I didn’t plan to make any more videos before my upcoming album is ready, but I stumbled upon a competition to remix Above & Beyond’s “You got to go”. Since I’ve recently discovered Anjunabeats and their great trance compilation Worldwide 03, which I’ve been spinning almost every day now for two weeks, I just had to take the time to give it a shot!

I saved only the vocals (sung by Zoë Johnston) from the original track and remade all music using only analog synths. The analog synths and analog drum machines were controlled in realtime by a MIDI sequencer and mixed together with the vocal using an analog mixer and hardware effects.

Equipment used: Korg Mono/Poly, Polysix, Poly-61; Roland Juno-60, Alpha Juno, TR-808 (w. MIDI); Moog Source; Oberheim Matrix 6R; Vermona DRM1 Mk III; Electro Harmonix Small Stone; Boss BD-2 (H2O mod), DD-3; Lexicon MPX500; DBX 290; Emagic AMT8; M-Audio Midisport 8×8/s; Alesis iO26; Cubase SL 1.06; Allen & Heath GS1; Yamaha S30 (as MIDI keyboard); Doepfer MCV1; Kenton Pro 2.

Camera: Canon HF100

Hope you enjoy my t-shirt! ;)

“The Unknown” by TSF

September 4, 2011 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

“This new composition is about the unknown, and having no idea where things are going but knowing that you’ll get there somehow and enjoying the journey along the way.
The piano lead (Yamaha Motif-6/A-90) played by Danielle is improvised over the accompaniment of the Jupiter-8 res/bass patch and the D-50 synth strings patch played by Crystal.
TR-808 drum machine is also used for an analog percussion track.

Please enjoy the randomness.
and thanks for joining us on the journey. :)”

Back in time – Analog electro 80s

May 9, 2011 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

All things analog and here among other things you will witness the Jupiter 8.

The Jupiter 8 was Roland’s first truly professional analog synthesizer. The Jupiter 8 features 16 rich analog oscillators at 2 per voice, eight voice polyphony and easy programming! At eight voices you can get some pretty thick analog sounds. Easy and intuitive programming via front panel sliders, knobs and buttons for all your tweaking needs. The legacy of the Jupiter synthesizers is due to their unique voice architecture and design, creating sounds that were so unreal and amazing that they have to be heard! No other synths in the world can create analog sounds as cool and authentic as these.

The Jupiter 8 was the biggest and fattest of them all (Jupiters and Junos)! It was one of the first synths to allow its keyboard to be split and layered – it’s eight voices of trance heaven! Cross-mod, oscillator sync, a great LFO and a classic arpeggiator are also on-board. There’s also two killer resonant analog 24dB/oct filters with 2-pole and 4-pole settings as well as low- and high-pass filtering methods. Unfortunately for the earlier models, tuning was very unstable but that seemed to be resolved in later models. Unlike its smaller counterpart, the Jupiter 6, the Jup 8 does not feature MIDI, only Roland’s DCB sync can be found on some models. However, MIDI retro-kit’s are available from various companies. Patch presets can store keyboard splits, arpeggiator settings, voice assign mode, hold, portamento and modulation settings.

But you will also notice the fat sound of the TR808:

The Roland TR-808 Rhythm Composer was one of the first programmable drum machines (“TR” serving as an initialism for Transistor Rhythm). Introduced by the Roland Corporation in early 1980, it was originally manufactured for use as a tool for studio musicians to create demos. Like earlier Roland drum machines, it does not sound very much like a real drum kit. Indeed, because the TR-808 came out a few months after the Linn LM-1 (the first drum machine to use digital samples), professionals generally considered its sound inferior to sampling drum machines; a 1982 Keyboard Magazine review of the Linn Drum indirectly referred to the TR-808 as sounding like marching anteaters. However, the TR-808 cost US$1,000 upon its release, which was considerably more affordable than the US$5,000 LM-1.

Drum machines in general became an integral part of hip hop music as a cheap and simple way of producing a drum sound. The Roland TR-808 held specific appeal because of the ability of its bass drum sound to produce extremely low-frequency sounds.

In this video:

This video features a Jupiter-8 bass patch U: (21), slightly edited with Fc set to 6 with no resonance. this patch is in poly-1 mode, (half of JPs oscillators used). Also featured is the TR-808 with an original pattern programmed just before the recording. Both the Jupiter-8 and TR-808 are magic machines!

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