Brand new teaser trailer from UVI featuring the UVX-10P

November 22, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

❐ Buy UVX-10P : http://www.uvi.net/uvx-10p.html
❐ UVI Official Website : http://www.uvi.net

Tap into the power of 3 analog super-synths—the JX-10, MKS-70 and JX-8P. UVX-10P recalls the last true analog synthesizers from the famed masterminds behind the Juno and Jupiter series, delivering a lush and extravagant analog sound. A fully-programmable interface lets you dive in and craft your own patches—utilize our high-quality amp and multimode filter designs, multiple effects, LFO, step modulator and much more.

In 1985 the world was introduced to the JX-10, a 12-voice, 24-oscillator analog synthesizer par excellence and the last true analog synth of its lineage. Following in the footsteps of the JX-8P and JX-3P, the Super JX was fashioned with a sparse aesthetic. A lack of knobs made the system a bit of a chore to program but an external controller (the PG800) could be attached, cheerfully reuniting synthesists with the immediacy and rapid programming speed of the ever-popular Jupiter and Juno lines. The JX-10 is known for an immense and capable analog sound, even some digital textures; it’s simply a magnificent synth. Programming capabilities were equally rich with independent control of 2 DCOs per voice, 2 EGs, 2 VCFs, onboard chorus and even a sequencer (albeit a limited one).

UVX-10P was designed to deliver on all of the strengths of the JX series with none of the weaknesses. We started with a pristine JX-10, MKS-70, and JX-8P and set off, tirelessly programming and sampling these beauties in high-resolution through a world-class signal chain. As with the UVX-3P we made every sample twice, with and without the built-in chorus, providing an authentic and versatile foundation. This sonic backbone paired with the UVI Engine results in a lush and extravagant analog sound; faithful to the hardware with a modern studio bite. UVX-10P delivers a fully-featured and fully-programmable interface sporting ADSR control of our high-quality amp and multimode filter designs, multiple effects, LFO and step modulator, a tediously crafted library of 150+ patches and even original wave samples for you to create your own programs with.

A perfect complement to UVX-3P, UVX-10P delivers a tremendous analog sound at an outstanding price. Add a piece of vintage synth history to your collection today!

Alesis Andromeda A6…The Return

November 17, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

The second video in series demoing the Alesis Andromeda A6 analog synth.

— Fx’s Used —
DAW Fx: Synapse Audio Diffuse Delay
A6 Fx: Reverb, Analog Distortion

Time machine: ROLAND SH-2000 Analog Synthesizer 1974

November 8, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

AnalogAudio1 plays the Roland SH-2000 with reverb effects from a Lexicon MPX-500 and delay effects from a Roland DEP-5.

The Roland SH-2000 is a preset monophonic analog synth with aftertouch. You can tweak the presets a bit with LFO and filter controls.

The SH-2000, introduced in 1973, is Roland’s second synthesizer and is essentially a limited version of the SH-1000. Like the 1000, it is a single-oscillator monophonic analog Preset synthesizer designed to sit atop a home organ. It’s got a great old analog sound but its lack of edit-ability and connectivity compared to the SH-1000 is what ultimately holds it back from being really great.

SH-2000_Front

Its 37-note keyboard are several colorful tab switches which are used to select any one of its 30 Preset sounds. They range from the usual to the unusual: Tuba, Trombone, French Horn, Trumpet, Saxophone, Bassoon, Oboe, Flute, Clarinet, Cello, Violin, Bass Guitar, Hawaiian Guitar, Banjo, Fuzz Guitar I, Fuzz Guitar II; Piano, Harpsichord, Accordion, Vibraphone, Xylophone; Singing Voice, Song Whistle, Popcorn, Space Reed, Planet, Frog Man, Funny Cat, Growl Wow and Wind.

Left of the keyboard are the only editable controllers available on the SH-2000. They include the filter’s cutoff, resonance and modulation sliders, LFO modulation rate, portamento, vibrato, pitch bend, volume and master tuning. The filter and LFO are severely limited and there are no ADSR envelope controls. However, the cool ‘Growl’ and ‘Wow’ effects and the Random Note Generator from the SH-1000 are here, which is nice. Amazingly, this 1973 synth has aftertouch, called the ‘Touch Effect’ which can be assigned to modulate the volume, Vibrato, pitch, ‘Wow’ and ‘Growl’ effects. A few other drawbacks to the SH-2000 is the total lack of CV/Gate for external communication and no user memory.

The SH-2000 is great for squeaky effects and growling bass notes. However the SH-1000 offers much more flexibility and a better sounding filter.

Review: Arturia MicroBrute – Pure Analog Monophonic Synthesizer

November 7, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Alex from Sonic Sense Pro Audio demonstrates the new Arturia MicroBrute analog synthesizer.

MicroBrute is pure analog sonic powerhouse of a synth. Small in size but loaded with features, it follows in the footsteps laid by its big brother the MiniBrute.

Packed with mixable waveforms, a new sub oscillator design, the famous Steiner-Parker multimode filter, super fast envelope, syncable LFO and the new step sequencer, not to mention the patchable mod matrix the MicroBrute is a landmark new synth at an incredible price.

More info here >>

Exploring – Korg MS-20 mini Monophonic Analog Synthesizer

November 5, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

This video will provide instructional information on how to use the Envelope Generator onboard the Korg MS-20 mini.

For more information on the KORG MS-20 mini, head over to http://www.korg.com/ms20mini

This video will provide instructional information on how to use the Oscillators that are onboard the Korg MS-20 mini.

Elektron Analog Four with Octatrak & Roland TR 606 Drum

November 5, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

The 606 has been modded by Analogue Solutions.
Much punchier than my old one :-)

roland-tr-606

The 606 was the percussion side-kick to the TB-303. It even looks like the 303. It stores up to 32 patterns and 8 songs. The 606 allows switching between Pattern Play and Write mode while running – making the 606 the only drumcomputer in the X0X series that can be edited while performing and switching patterns. It is also possible to link up to 4 consecutive patterns in Pattern Play mode. There is only a mono audio output, however there are mods from Kenton Electronics and Analog Solutions that will add individual outputs for each drum tone.

The 606 has seven analog drum sounds which are simple, yet great! Kick, Snare, 2 toms, open hat, closed hat, cymbal, accent. The hi-hats are a very tinny electronic sound and its toms are great for soft tribal patterns.

 

Bass Station II Self Oscillating Filter Demo

November 2, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

John Keston explores the Bass Station II, below his report:

I have recently been trying out a Novation Bass Station II monophonic analogue synthesizer. I am quite impressed with this big sounding synth in a small package. While digitally controlled, Novation have focused on packing in proper synthesis features rather than trying to gloss over the sound with onboard effects. For example, as I have illustrated in the video, the filter self oscillates nicely with a clean sine wave that can be modulated in unique ways especially with distinct features like oscillator slew.

The video starts with the self oscillating filter getting modulated by LFO 2 using the triangle wave. After that I switch to using the sample and hold setting creating the well-known 60s computer sound of random notes. Here’s where it gets interesting though. Once I switch the LFO to sample and hold I start turning up the oscillator slew I mentioned earlier. What this does is variably smooth the wave shapes created by the LFO. You’ll hear this come in at 0:28. It sounds like portamento. At 0:35 I switch the LFO to the square wave, but with the slew on it sounds more like a sine. As I reduce the amount of slew the square wave regains its recognizable character. Next I switch it to the saw tooth wave. The nice thing here is that the LFO amount can go into negative values allowing the saw to be reversed.

Another distinctive feature is the oscillator filter mod setting. This modulates the filter with oscillator 2. Since the oscillators range from subsonic to almost supersonic this feature offers modulation effects that are not possible with the LFOs. At 1:29 you will start to hear the oscillator filter mod come in using a pulse waveform. What makes this interesting is that while oscillator 2 is modulating the filter it can also have the pulse width modulated by LFO 1. This can cause bit-reduction-like effects that can be heard between 1:49 and 2:19. At 2:20 I start tapping the octave and waveform buttons on oscillator 2 illustrating what happens when the modulation source is instantly shifted an octave at a time. After a bit more messing around I added a final, manual filter sweep at 3:20.

http://audiocookbook.org/novation-bas…

Waldorf PULSE 2 — 1st Encounter — Real Time ARPEGGIO Tweaking

November 1, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

BRANDNEW WALDORF PULSE 2
1st Encounter Session Outtake
ARPEGGIO

Pulse 2 Analog Synthesizer is proof positive that good things can come to those who wait. For ever since this high-quality synthesizer developer discontinued its original rack-mountable Pulse and Pulse+ programmable analogue monosynths boasting ballsy bass tones and legendary leads beyond compare, those Nineties electronic music dominating sounds have been severely sought-after by those in the know. Which was exactly what drove us into development overdrive to produce an all-new Pulse fit for the 21st Century.

As an all-new, all-analogue synthesizer design, Pulse 2 flawlessly delivers exactly what synth connoisseurs around the world have been truly craving for quite some time — three analogue oscillators living in perfect harmony with a VCF (VoltageControlled Filter), yet we did not stop there: the fresh filter circuits in the Pulse 2 now offer 12dB Highpass and Bandpass modes in addition to 24dB/12dB Lowpass for strengthened sound-sculpting flexibility, while we added analogue Filter FM, two Overdrive circuits, and Ring Modulation from OSC 3, together with Paraphonic and Unison modes allowing up to eight-voice chords — a fantastic feature found on our recently-released Rocket Synthesizer.

Analog Monophonic Synthesizer
  • 3 analog oscillators + 1 noise generator
  • Pulse width modulation
  • Hard sync
  • Filter FM from Oscillator 3
  • Ring Modulation from Oscillator 3
  • XOR Osc Mode
  • 8/4 Voice Paraphonic modes
  • Cascade Filter
  • 24dB/12db Lowpass, 12db Highpass/Bandpass filter modes
  • Powerful Arpeggiator
  • 8-slot Modulation Matrix
  • USB
  • MIDI
  • External analog signal input
  • Stereo line out
  • Headphone out
  • Backwards compatible with classic Pulse
  • 128×64 character backlit LCD
  • 8 stainless steel knobs
  • 500 Sound Programs
  • Electron-absorbing black case

Korg R3 Analog & Presets Sound DEMO

October 27, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Quick groove sound check of custom & stock sounds on Korg’s R3 Virtual Analog Synthesizer

The R3 is marketed as a “Synthesizer/Vocoder”, and the included gooseneck mic lets you take full advantage of its 16-band vocoding capabilities right out of the box. Simply enter Vocoder mode for access to all of the vocoder’s variables that work with an internal or external carrier signal. It also lets you record up to sixteen 7.5-second Formant Motion sequences, allowing you to play saved phrases—albeit at a fixed tempo—through the vocoder without external input. Whether you’re looking to channel the spirits of sci-fi robots, make a guitar do backing vocals or are in need of some unconventional choral accompaniment, the R3′s pro-grade vocoder earns its place in both the mix and the title.

Each of the 128 editable patches can contain up to two timbres, sharing the somewhat meager polyphony between them. These can be layered or divided across the keyboard and can be assigned to individual MIDI channels. Each of these two timbres contain all the capabilities listed, so despite being well suited for mono and lead styles it’s possible to get surprisingly complex, evolving pads which belie its 8-note polyphony. This is best displayed when using each timbre’s modulation sequence, which lets you record a variable’s knob changes and can yield complex changes in a single key press. There’s also a 6-mode arpeggiator with a toggle button and latch control to further animate the sound.

Every timbre consists of two LFOs, two oscillators, a wave-shaper with sub-oscillator options, two insert effects, and three envelope generators for filter, amp, and one for assignment using the Virtual Patch system. This feature lets you define up to six additional routings, giving the unit a fitting touch of modular dynamics which can add subtle dynamics or make sounds spiral off into mayhem. Unfortunately the routings are limited, but most of the logical sources and destinations are included. The two oscillators cover a wide range of traditional analog waveforms with some useful extras (osc1 includes 64 DWGS preset waveforms and the vowel-like Formant wave) and allow a number of interactions between them: ring mod, VPM and unison, among others. External signals can also be processed through the filters, gates and effects. All of this is wrapped up with one master effect and a variable 2-band EQ with some other fine-tuning mods to polish the finished sound.

All of this programming demands an intuitive interface, and although it involves some menu-diving, this is handled by selecting the category with a rotary encoder and then editing individual variables with the 4 main pots. Though it isn’t “per-knob” editing, each pot is encircled by a slick-looking LED halo which shows the value regardless of the knob’s current position. Each knob also has its own small LCD screen which can show the variable or its value by hitting the shift key. This combination along with the Original Value light takes much of the drudgery and guesswork out of building your own patches, but it’s recommended to load up the included software editor since some sub-variable and effects tweaks can seem cryptic at first.

One more nice demo: Arturia Microbrute – new analog Synthesizer

October 26, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Some sounds taken from Arturia´s new baby – the MicroBrute. A very tiny 100% analog synthesizer with the same sound like his big brother MiniBrute. There are several new features like the Stepsequenzer and the Patchfield with CV for some Modulations. The very good sounding Steiner-Parker-Filter with HP, BP and LP is also present. The MicroBrute is the perfect complement to his Big Brother or a Modular-System. More info at:
http://www.arturia.com/evolution/en/p…

MAIN FEATURES:

  • Monophonic synthesizer
  • 100% Analog Audio Signal Path
  • Steiner-Parker Multimode Filter (LP, BP, HP)
  • Voltage Controlled Oscillator with new Overtone Sub-Osc
  • Oscillator Mixer (Sub, Sawtooth, Square, Triangle)
  • LFO with 3 waveforms and destination attenuator
  • Brute Factor™ delivering saturation and rich harmonics
  • Ultrasaw generating shimmering sawtooth waveforms
  • Metalizer bringing extreme triangle harmonics
  • Fast Envelope Generator
  • 25 note mini Keyboard
  • External Analog Audio Input (level pot on rear)
  • CV Inputs: Pitch, Filter, Sub-mod, Pulse, Saw animator, metalizer, gate in.
  • CV outputs: Pitch, Gate, Env, LFO
  • MIDI Inwith 5-Pin DIN connector
  • USB MIDI In/Out
  • 1/4” Audio Output and 1/8” Headphone Output
  • Free Editor Software
  • Step Sequencer :
    • 8 sequences stored on power down
    • Rate control
    • Sync to MIDI clock
    • Multiple modes (via software editor)
  • Tap tempo/rest insert

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