Demo of Scape – the new iPad app by Brian Eno and Peter Chilvers

September 26, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Scape
Available now for iPad
http://www.generativemusic.com

Scape makes music that thinks for itself. From Brian Eno and Peter Chilvers, creators of Bloom, Scape is a new form of album which offers users deep access to its musical elements. These can be endlessly recombined to behave intelligently: reacting to each other, changing mood together, making new sonic spaces.

Can machines create original music? Scape is our answer to that question: it employs some of the sounds, processes and compositional rules that we have been using for many years and applies them in fresh combinations, to create new music. Scape makes music that thinks for itself.

- Brian Eno, Peter Chilvers

Includes 15 original scapes
Scapes can be saved into a gallery and added to a playlist
Plays in background of other apps (excluding iPad 1)
Generates random scapes
Scapes can be shared by email
Supports AirPlay and Retina display

Headphones or external speakers recommended

Brian Eno
Synthesiser, found sound, bells, bass guitar, strategies, images, art direction

Peter Chilvers
Synthesiser, chapman stick, structures, probability networks, additional images, software design

New music creation app from Brian Eno called Scape

September 21, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Scape makes music that thinks for itself. From Brian Eno and Peter Chilvers, creators of Bloom, Scape is a new form of album which offers users deep access to its musical elements. These can be endlessly recombined to behave intelligently: reacting to each other, changing mood together, making new sonic spaces.

Here’s what they have to say about Scape:

“Scape is a new form of album which offers users deep access to its musical elements. These can be endlessly recombined to behave intelligently: reacting to each other, changing mood together, making new sonic spaces.”
Can machines create original music? Scape is our answer to that question: it employs some of the sounds, processes and compositional rules that we have been using for many years and applies them in fresh combinations, to create new music. Scape makes music that thinks for itself.

- Brian Eno, Peter Chilvers

  • Includes 15 original scapes
  • Scapes can be saved into a gallery and added to a playlist
  • Plays in background of other apps (excluding iPad 1)
  • Generates random scapes
  • Scapes can be shared by email
  • Supports AirPlay and Retina display

Headphones or external speakers recommended

Scape is $5.99 in the App Store.

Awesome fan video: Brian Eno – Kings Lead Hat

June 8, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Video from the 1977 album, Before and After Science, By Brian Eno.
Polydor Records

Brian Eno – Remiix International Feel

September 29, 2011 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Here’s a quick demo of the new interactive record for iPad/iPhone from International Feel available from Sept 27 2011. Featuring BPM & key matched tracks from Locussolus (DJ Harvey), Rocha, Hungry Ghost, Bubble Club & Coyote, it gives you the chance to make your own version of these tracks, or make a completely new track out of the component parts of all/any of them.

Buy Remiix International Feel on iTunes:
http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/remiix-international-feel/id463813127

Product description:

To help celebrate their two year anniversary, remix the Balearic sounds of the mysterious label from Uruguay: International Feel. Combine instrumental loops, playful vocals, slo-mo drum & percussion loops and mercury infused basslines, straight from the shores of Vesuvius.

Remiix International Feel is an interactive record, a 2011 version of Brian Eno’s ‘Generative Music’. You mean you’re still listening to the same record over and over again?! It’s also a perfect DJ tool, containing six tracks (and their component parts) from the label’s roster, presented in an interactive format. The songs are all automatically beat-matched and repitched in key.

The range of sounds is tantalising, especially considering you can really isolate and pick out your favorite combinations. Some standouts include the bassline from “Next To You” – a long loop that turns around with syncopated leaps in the melody, the vocals from “Moving” – smooth house/disco loops that could add a sensual flavor to any mix, or the epic guitars from “Illuminations” – sitting comfortably between disco and early prog rock.

Remiix International Feel includes effects specially tailored to suit the sounds from the label. The first, RVB, simulates early analog plate reverb effects. The other is called the WAH and it lets you add subtle or drastic Leslie rotating speaker effects. You’ll recognise the sound as a throwback to the time of 70s disco and electric pianos.

Over the past 12 months International Feel has released tracks and remixes by DJ Harvey, Daniele Baldelli, Still Going, Greg Wilson, Joakim, Quiet Village and many others, as well as breaking new artists like Rocha and Hungry Ghost. This year has also seen acclaimed album releases from Gatto Fritto and DJ Harvey’s Locussolus project (from which two tracks are included on this version of Remiix).

Says label boss Mark B: “International Feel is based in Punta Del Este on Uruguay’s Atlantic Coast. The label came into existence to create a home for open minded music heads driven by 100% passion and perfection in everything we do. Whether it be the music itself or the vinyl cut… the artwork or the remixes, we strive to create pieces of music and artwork that play with expectations, never drop the quality and become desirable and collectable items of timeless beauty.”

Tracklist:
Hungry Ghost – Illuminations
Bubble Club – The Goddess
Rocha – Hands Of Love
Locussolus – Next To You
Coyote – Moving
Locussolus – I Want It

Nice cover of Brian Eno’s “Here comes the warm jets”

June 26, 2011 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

 

Background info:

Equipment: Korg Electribe EA1, EM1, ER1, ES1 & KP3 Kaoss pad.
Hardware only. Synths just as they are.. no overdubs.

‘Here Come The Warm Jets’ written by Brian Eno (1974).
Publisher: UMPG Publishing (Witchsphere has tried to contact these people).

This cover version is recorded and played by Witchsphere.
Video: Witchsphere and Public Domain sources.

Trip to the moon courtesy of NASA and Apollo 17.

This published content copyright Witchsphere 2011.
All rights reserved.

Brian Eno lecture in Russia

June 17, 2011 · Posted in Uncategorized · 1 Comment 

I was in Moscow last week, it is a shame I missed this :-)

“Eno talks about the history of music and painting in the twentieth century and how the two came together. He also talks about his own work in relationship to twentieth century music and painting.”

Free track from Brian Eno – enjoy :-)

May 25, 2011 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Warp’s Brian Eno site is offering a free download of “Imagine New Times”, a track from the Rick Holland-Brian Eno Drums Between The Bells sessions which won’t be on the album. Simply give them your e-mail address again, get the download link, and then you can just keep it looping. (Thanks to Bernd Kretzschmar.) Brian’s delivery is reminiscent of his 1999 -era installations — perhaps fittingly, as one of them ran at the Holland Festival.

Get it here >>

 

The Revenge of the Intuitive – Brian Eno featured in Wired

May 16, 2011 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

I recently spent three days working with what is possibly the most advanced recording console in the world, and I have to report that it was a horribly unmusical experience. The console, which has more than 10,000 controls on its surface and a computer inside, was designed in such a way that music-making tasks once requiring a single physical switch now require a several-step mental negotiation. My engineer kept saying “Wait a minute” and then had to duck out of the musical conversation we were having so he could go into secretarial mode to execute complex computer-like operations. It’s as though a new layer of bureaucracy has interposed itself between me and the music we want to make. After days of tooth-gnashing frustration, I had to admit that something has gone wrong with the design of technology – and I was paying $2,000 a day in studio fees to discover it.

Years ago I realized that the recording studio was becoming a musical instrument. I even lectured about it, proclaiming that “by turning sound into malleable material, studios invite you to construct new worlds of sounds as painters construct worlds of form and color.” I was thrilled at how people were using studios to make music that otherwise simply could not exist. Studios opened up possibilities. But now I’m struck by the insidious, computer-driven tendency to take things out of the domain of muscular activity and put them into the domain of mental activity. This transfer is not paying off. Sure, muscles are unreliable, but they represent several million years of accumulated finesse. Musicians enjoy drawing on that finesse (and audiences respond to its exercise), so when muscular activity is rendered useless, the creative process is frustrated. No wonder artists who can afford the best of anything keep buying “retro” electronics and instruments, and revert to retro media.

The trouble begins with a design philosophy that equates “more options” with “greater freedom.” Designers struggle endlessly with a problem that is almost nonexistent for users: “How do we pack the maximum number of options into the minimum space and price?” In my experience, the instruments and tools that endure (because they are loved by their users) have limited options.

Software options proliferate extremely easily, too easily in fact, because too many options create tools that can’t ever be used intuitively. Intuitive actions confine the detail work to a dedicated part of the brain, leaving the rest of one’s mind free to respond with attention and sensitivity to the changing texture of the moment. With tools, we crave intimacy. This appetite for emotional resonance explains why users – when given a choice – prefer deep rapport over endless options. You can’t have a relationship with a device whose limits are unknown to you, because without limits it keeps becoming something else.

Indeed, familiarity breeds content. When you use familiar tools, you draw upon a long cultural conversation – a whole shared history of usage – as your backdrop, as the canvas to juxtapose your work. The deeper and more widely shared the conversation, the more subtle its inflections can be.

This is the revenge of traditional media. Even the “weaknesses” or the limits of these tools become part of the vocabulary of culture. I’m thinking of such stuff as Marshall guitar amps and black-and-white film – what was once thought most undesirable about these tools became their cherished trademark.

The Marshall guitar amplifier doesn’t just get louder when you turn it up. It distorts the sound to produce a whole range of new harmonics, effectively turning a plucked string instrument into a bowed one. A responsible designer might try to overcome this limitation – probably the engineers at Marshall tried, too. But that sound became the sound of, among others, Jimi Hendrix. That sound is called “electric guitar.” Or think of grainy black-and-white film, or jittery Super 8, or scratches on vinyl. These limitations tell you something about the context of the work, where it sits in time, and by invoking that world they deepen the resonances of the work itself.

Since so much of our experience is mediated in some way or another, we have deep sensitivities to the signatures of different media. Artists play with these sensitivities, digesting the new and shifting the old. In the end, the characteristic forms of a tool’s or medium’s distortion, of its weakness and limitations, become sources of emotional meaning and intimacy.

Although designers continue to dream of “transparency” – technologies that just do their job without making their presence felt – both creators and audiences actually like technologies with “personality.” A personality is something with which you can have a relationship. Which is why people return to pencils, violins, and the same three guitar chords.

Via Wired

New documentary on Brian Eno

March 29, 2011 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Musician, composer, producer, music theorist, singer and visual artist; probably best known for his early work with Roxy Music, his production duties for U2 & Coldplay, and as one of the principal innovators of ambient music. This documentary film – the first ever about Eno – explores his life, career and music between the years 1971 & 1977, the period that some view as his golden age. Featuring numerous exclusive interviews, contributions from a range of musicians, writers, collaborators and friends – plus performance and studio film and an abundance of the most exceptional music ever created

Duel: Up vs. Down

February 3, 2011 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HxHqnztxpTg

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