Tme machine: YAMAHA AN1x “X-Rays”

May 26, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

The AN1x is a powerful retro-analog synth with a really cool new feature that lets you record real-time editing and filtering and be able to store it as part of the sound! A major contender in the new wave of analog-digital synths using DSP modeling of analog waveforms to recreate the coveted sounds of analog synths with modern digital specifications. It offers truly traditional yet modern methods of analog synthesizing, 10 notes of polyphony, 8 knobs for tweaking, and an arpeggiator with dozens of inspiring patterns!

Although the AN1x is not a follow-up to the CS1x (which has since been followed by the CS2x and the CS6x) it has borrowed many functions and technologies from the CS1x synth. First, it’s built in an almost identical case with the same layout of buttons and knobs as the CS1x. However the function of every knob and button has been greatly expanded. The AN1x also has 2 Scene memories for instant recall of any envelope and filter settings and the mod-wheel can be used to morph between the two scenes. On-board effects and a state-of-the-art arpeggiator section also are on-board for giving your sounds life and motion.

The AN1x adds a new Ribbon controller for increased real-time control. It also includes pulse width modulation, ring modulation and oscillator syncing. The AN1x may not be the next evolution of the CS1x but it is basically a more advanced synth capable of increased sound potential and quality. It has a better feeling keyboard than the CS1x as well assuming that the AN1x is for those looking for something more professional than the CS1x.

Synthesizer demo track by RetroSound
“X-Rays”

all synthesizer sounds and drums: YAMAHA AN1x VA Synthesizer (1997)
sequencing: internal step-sequencer
recording: multi-tracking without midi

X-Rays (Röntgen X-radiation) is a form of electromagnetic radiation. X-rays have a wavelength in the range of 0.01 to 10 nanometers. (wikipedia)

I know this is the vintage synth channel but for me is the YAMAHA AN1x synthesizer from the year 1997 the best virtual-analog synth ever. absolut deep and unique sound. so underrated in my opinion.

more info: http://www.retrosound.de and
http://www.facebook.com/pages/RetroSo…

The Yamaha DX7- Part One: The Operators

May 14, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Here is a demonstration of the sound and functionality of the operators of the Yamaha DX7.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_7CKJj…

One of the most popular digital synths ever was the DX7 from Yamaha, released in 1983. It featured a whole new type of synthesis called FM (Frequency Modulation). It certainly is not analog and it is difficult to program but can result in some excellent sounds! It is difficult because it is non-analog and thus, a whole new set of parameters are available for tweaking, many of which seemed counter-intuitive and unfamiliar. And programming had to be accomplished via membrane buttons, one data slider and a small LCD screen.

dx_7

Still the sounds it shipped with and that many users did manage to create were more complex and unique than anything before it. Percussive and metallic but thick as analog at times, the DX7 was known for generating unique sounds still popular to this day. The DX7 was also a truly affordable programmable synth when it was first released. Almost every keyboardist bought one at the time making the DX7 one of the best selling synths of all time! It also came with MIDI which was brand new at the time – Sequential had already released the first MIDI synth, the Prophet 600. Roland had just released the JX-3P with very basic MIDI implementation, and wouldn’t get around to adding full MIDI for another year with the Juno-106, and it would be three years before Roland can counter the popularity of the DX7 with a digital synth of their own, the D-50.

UVI has released Digital Synsations | Official Trailer UVI©

April 12, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

UVI has released Digital Synsations, a new virtual vintage synths collection inspired by four 90s classic keyboards – the Yamaha SY77, the Korg M1, the Roland D50 and the Ensoniq VFX.

❐ Buy Digital Synsations : http://bit.ly/digital-synsations
❐ UVI Official Website : http://www.uvi.net
❐ UVI Official Blog : http://blog.uvi.net

A brand-new massive library inspired by four 90s classic keyboards — the Yamaha SY77, the Korg M1, the Roland D50 and the Ensoniq VFX : UVI Digital Synsations

Digital Synsations includes over 500 patches expertly programmed on a fully restored Yamaha SY77, Korg M1, Roland D50 and Ensoniq VFX‚ used by many of the greats including Depeche Mode, The Cure, Pet Shop Boys, Vangelis, Brian Eno, Toto, 808 State, Jean Michael Jarre and more.

We deeply multi-sampled these custom patches using top-shelf equipment and edited them to perfection before sending them off for professional mastering. These sonics became the foundation for our new hybrid instrument and combined with the UVI Engine give you the true character of these classic synths with all of the peculiarities and programming by products intact. Not only that but you get them in an extremely easy to use and fast to edit environment complete with all the features you expect from a modern virtual instrument.

If you’re looking for a new take on the 90’s sound, or just some new classic synth inspiration then look no further.

———————————————————————————

* UVI is not affiliated, endorsed or sponsored by the Yamaha Corporation, the Korg Corporation, the Roland Corporation or the Ensoniq Corp. All trademarks are held by their respective owners.

** iLok required

Doepfer Dark Time – Islands in the ocean

April 8, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Background video description:

Yesterday was E-day, always inspiring, you met people who are also involved in E-music which genarate new ideas.
This one pops up, just a combinated single 8 step and 4 step row off the Doepfer Dark Time. The 4 step row controls the Moog LP bass and the 8 step the Waldorf micro Q and at 2:36 the Roland Juno 106.
Additional sounds/solo’s came from the Korg DS 8/Lamda, Realistic Concertmate MG-1 and the Kawai K1r.
Used delay’s for the Moog two from the Yamaha E1005 and the Ibanez DM1000, for Waldorf the Alesis Midiverb (3 triplets) and the Ibanez DM1000.
For the Juno I use the Electrix. Mo-fx.
Halfway there are some variations in tone / octave settings (Berlin School style).

I hope your enjoy, and feel free to leave a comment/question

Use a good audio device to listen to it.

greetings Hans

“Skoulaman”

Yamaha MU80, Ableton, Launchpad Demo

April 2, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Here is a demo Jordan Passmore recorded that is composed solely of tones from the Yamaha MU80. Ableton is sequencing most parts while he plays one patch manually. The track’s clips are all triggered by me with a Novation Launchpad. No effects were added to the MU-80.

“I feel like a lot of producers dismiss ROMplers like the Yamaha MU80 but I really, really enjoy using these things. They’re limited in a fantastic way; paired up with a solid sequencer (like Ableton) you can arrive to a place in your productions you may never thought existed.”

Yamaha SK-15 Demo

March 22, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Yamaha’s SK-series are combo-keyboards with synthesizer, organ, brass and string sections. The SK-10 was the first of the SK-series, released in 1979 – the SK-20, 30 and 50D followed in 1980, and the SK-15 in 1981, possibly as a replacement for the SK-10. The SK-10 is the only one in the series that does not incorporate a synth section, but has organ, brass and string sections that can all be played together for more interesting combinations. Very sturdy casing, 4-octave and fully polyphonic the features also include a leslie simulator, vibrato, attack and sustain rocker switches, a slider for ‘brilliance’ and a one-octave transpose switch. Not exactly feature-laden, but a lovely string synth sound. Interestingly, they are often referred to as ‘analog’, but in fact do have a digital section. Its organ has one of the early implementations of Yamaha’s FM technology in a very limited form, concurrent with the GS-1/2 development platforms which eventually led to the DX series.

“Just a quick-and-dirty demo of the Yamaha SK-15 Synthesizer. Please excuse my poor playing skills, I was just making stuff up to show off the various sounds the machine is capable of making. This particular machine I stripped down and nearly completely rebuilt, making more than a few changes in the audio pathway.”

Time machine: YAMAHA SK-10 String Machine 1979

March 16, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Synthesizer Demo of the analog synthesizer/string machine YAMAHA SK-10.

The SK-10 was introduced 1979 by Yamaha, Japan. It is the smallest instrument of the Yamaha SK-series.

yamaha_sk20

Yamaha’s SK-series are combo-keyboards with synthesizer, organ, brass and string sections. The SK-10 was the first of the SK-series, released in 1979 – the SK-20, 30 and 50D followed in 1980, and the SK-15 in 1981, possibly as a replacement for the SK-10. The SK-10 is the only one in the series that does not incorporate a synth section, but has organ, brass and string sections that can all be played together for more interesting combinations. Very sturdy casing, 4-octave and fully polyphonic the features also include a leslie simulator, vibrato, attack and sustain rocker switches, a slider for ‘brilliance’ and a one-octave transpose switch. Not exactly feature-laden, but a lovely string synth sound. Interestingly, they are often referred to as ‘analog’, but in fact do have a digital section. Its organ has one of the early implementations of Yamaha’s FM technology in a very limited form, concurrent with the GS-1/2 development platforms which eventually led to the DX series.

The ORGAN SECTION is available in all the SK series synthesizers. It offers a full range of stop levers from 1′ to 16′, percussion levers with adjustable decay, and controls for overall sustain, brilliance and decay. This gives you quite a lot to work with in the way of synthesis. The organ’s sound is FM based and it sounds very B3 like. You can add a Vibrato and a noisy but good Tremolo to it. Its sound is all about the 70’s era rock organ, especially with the Ensemble chorus effect in use. It also has a Leslie-speaker output around back.

The PRESET STRINGS section isn’t very sophisticated and offers very limited editing capabilities. It is the string section though, that is worth aquiring this keyboard for.

All the different sections of the SK synths can be layered and stacked via the slider bars. You use the slider bars as a mixer to set the individual volume for each section. All sections have their own separate audio outs (though a mix out is also available). A great thing for live performances is the split keyboard mode. That way you can have, for example, a very nice, punchy bass sound from the synth section and a lead sound coming from the organ or solo sections. Although it has no patch memory, there are push buttons for instantaneous selection of organ, poly-synth and string preset sounds; there are three presets in each section. It also, has no arpeggiator or sequencer, and lacks MIDI. But it’s cheap, easy to use, has a nice sound, full 61-note keyboard, and classic wooden panels.

Time machine: Yamaha RX8 Drum Machine

February 20, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Yamaha RX8 drum machine. Yamaha launched the RX8 in 1989 as a replacement for the RX7 and to be Yamaha’s first drum machine using 16 bit PCM samples. In the late eighties there were several successful 16 bit drum machines available, the Alesis HR16 and HR16B as well as the Roland R8 and R5 to name a few, but the RX8 was still able to carve out a niche in the market of the time.

“Shaped like a plastic doorstop. Not one of the best drum machines ever but still has its charms. Not as boring as the RX17 and RX21. Clearly a budget drum machine, it boasted 16 bit samples and it would have gone head to head with the Alesis HR16, which had better samples.”

A Quick Run on Yamaha MX61

February 11, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Yamaha MX61 Synthesizer is heavily focused on performance; there isn’t the MOTIF in deept editing and you can only modify the very very main synth parameters of sounds. You can play two different parts in Split or Layer; the remaining 14 parts are available for composing/arranging/performing thru MIDI/USB with bundled Cubase.

Yamaha SY20 Sounddemo – Rare Yamaha Monophonic Analog synthesizer of 1982

February 8, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Yamaha SY20 Sounddemo (springreverb effect)
Copyrights Volker Hein – 2013
More information visit www.tastronauten.de

The SY20 was Yamaha’s last analog synthesizer model before committing to digital FM synthesis with products like the DX-series. It is an all-analog mono-synth that came out in 1982 but was never commercially sold outside of Japan, making it very rare. In fact, it was originally intended to be an “educational” synth to help students learn about synthesis. However, as most of the controls are labeled in Japanese characters, you will already need to be familiar with analog synthesizers (or Japanese) to grasp the SY20.

Despite being a rather simplistic looking mono-synth, the SY20 is a surprisingly refined and expressive synth. There are 20 preset sounds, arranged in two banks of ten. They include all the customary attempts at emulating the acoustic sounds of piano, woodwinds, stringed and brass instruments. The presets can be combined with the manual synthesizer control sections, which are very simply and logically laid out: VCO, VCF, and VCA, and each section can be individually switched on or off. There is an LFO to modulate each of these three sections for pitch, filter and tremolo effects. There is also Portamento and a one-octave Transpose knob that is notched in half-tone steps (it can be used to quickly transpose what you are playing to different keys).

The VCO section offers one oscillator with Square and Saw waveforms. A slider is used to mix between the two waveforms. The oscillator pitch can be set from 2′ to 32′. There is also Pulse-Width modulation and White Noise. The VCF offers three filter modes: low pass, and two band pass modes. The filter sounds really good, though it is not self-oscillating. The typical cutoff and resonance controls are accompanied by ADSR envelope controls for a nice contoured filter effect. The VCA section offers the standard ADSR controls as well.

While the main synthesis sections are all nicely laid out and straight forward, the real expressive potential comes from a few other simple but effective features. The 44-note keyboard supports after touch, which can be sent to the VCF, the VCA and the LFO for adding filter, volume and modulation effects using keyboard pressure. They can be combined in any way and with as much (or little) depth as needed for the desired effect. There are also three global effects: Portamento, Sustain and Brilliance.

The SY20 has a mono audio output, headphone jacks in the front and rear, and a built-in speaker! Unfortunately there is no CV/Gate and the MIDI specification was still a year away from being published, so it can not be hooked up to any sequencing equipment—you’re gonna have to play this one the old-fashioned way.

The SY20 has a lot to offer. It sounds really good—warm, pure, expressive and wholly analog. It is incredibly rare. It is the last analog synthesizer Yamaha designed before going digital. And it is covered mostly in Japanese characters. All these qualities combine to make it an historic and unique piece in any collection and it will definitely get used often, it may even become the “go-to” mono-synth for anybody lucky enough to own one!

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