Interview: Gary Numan, Synth Pop Prodigy Meets John Doran – The British Masters

January 11, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Watch John Interview Roxy Music’s Brian Ferry: http://youtu.be/m91SFw0G9GQ
John Doran meets Gary Numan for the second episode of The British Masters, our latest interview series featuring the most influential and colourful figures from British popular music history.

In Johns Words “Today I’m talking to Gary Numan, who became an overnight sensation in 1979 when his post punk group Tubeway Army released the single “Are ‘Friends’ Electric?” and then achieved worldwide success later the same year with the release of his first solo album, and one of the cornerstones of synth pop, ‘The Pleasure Principle.’ Following some very lean years in the wilderness, Gary started the long and arduous task of rebuilding his career in the mid-90s, becoming a peer of many industrial and techno artists he had originally been an influence on. We catch him on tour in the UK as he gears up for the release of his 18th solo album, the much anticipated “Splinter.”

Gary Numan’s new remix album “Dead Moon Falling” (Mortal Records), a remix of 2011′s “Dead Son Rising,” is available now from http://www.numan.co.uk

30th Anniversary of MIDI – by Roland

January 8, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

One standard started it all. One technology allowed different musical devices and computers to all speak the same language and make beautiful music together. Thirty years ago, MIDI was born…and the rest is history.

BENT: The Google Moog Mini-Doc

December 29, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Get free tracks from Carl Craig, El-P, Divine Fits and Exitmusic: http://goo.gl/DkYIB
Watch performances from the Moog Sound Lab: http://moogfest.com/

In May of 2012, Google turned its homepage over to Moog, creating a playable version of one of their synthesizers. The synth “Doodle” was used by over 300 million users, and brought a new level of attention to the Asheville, N.C.-based company. Acknowledging this, Moog, as part of their 3rd Annual Circuit Bending Contest held during the Moogfest music event, called for enthusiasts and benders to create a sampler and use the Google Moog Doodle as the basis for it’s sounds. The winning sampler was unlike anything we’d ever seen, and we contacted some of our favorite musicians, including Detroit techno pioneer Carl Craig and hip-hop icon El-P, to create or rework songs using this new tool. The resulting tracks and documentary chronicle the dynamic relationship between technology and music, and how each field pushes the other in unpredictable and amazing directions.

Subscribe to the Google Play YouTube channel: http://goo.gl/UX1U4

Roger Linn and Carl Craig: ‘Evolution of Drum Machines’

November 17, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

More info: http://bit.ly/TIfQZj
During Dubspot’s recent trip to Seattle’s Decibel Festival, our video team caught up with Roger Linn, the godfather of the modern drum machine, Carl Craig, one of Detroit’s most talented producers, for a lecture/discussion about the history and evolution of the rhythm machines that have shaped our musical world.

One of the most inspiring elements of Seattle’s annual Decibel Festival is the conversations that transpire between some of the world’s most talented musical thinkers. Decibel acts as a catalyst for these moments, with lectures and demonstrations taking place throughout the festival. We were especially excited to catch a workshop where drum machine creator and pioneer Roger Linn joined Detroit techno innovator Carl Craig for a talk on the evolution of drum machines and the future of electronic rhythm.

In this video, Linn explains that our assumption of drum machines appearing in the early 80s is incorrect, and he takes us on a tour of early electronic rhythm devices such as Leon Thermin’s Rhythmicon (1930), the Chamberlin Rhythmate (1957), Raymond Scott’s Bandito the Bongo Artist (1963), Seeburg’s Select-A-Rhythm (1964), the PAiA Programmable Drum Set (1975) and the CompuRhythm CR-78 (1978). Craig probes with questions regarding interface design for musicians vs. engineers, discusses the development of drum interfaces, and talks about how the Akai MPC changed his production and composition techniques.

Moog Factory Tour – History of the Theremin

November 14, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

This video has a little bit of everything… lol It features a quick look behind the scenes at the Moog Factory in Asheville, NC. We have a little history of the Theremin, and a peek of one being made in the factory… all the while PRIMUS jamming in the Moog Sound Lab. There is even a rare little jam with Les Claypool on electric drums and Jay Lane playing “Who’s got the funk” on Les’s acoustic bass! As I said… this video has everything! :)

The great folks at Moog Music were AMAZING! Asheville was AMAZING! Primus was AMAZING! Les Claypool is ALWAYS AMAZING (he even took a minute to pose for a picture goo.gl/pSisp )!

Thanks everyone… What an overall AMAZING time! :)

Patrick Feaster discusses “Pictures of Sound”

November 2, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

“Pictures of Sound: One Thousand Years of Educed Audio: 980-1980″ is a book/CD set produced by Patrick Feaster
http://www.dust-digital.com/feaster/
This video is derived from a slideshow that was presented by Patrick Feaster at the 2011 ARSC Conference: http://www.arsc-audio.org/

Roland Synth Story Tour

October 25, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Roland has come a long way since its inception in 1972. Its synths, drum machines and effects have been used on some of the most famous records ever and have helped artists push sonic boundaries, creating new sounds and even radical new musical genres.  Taking part over three dates in November, the Roland Synth Story tour will explore this rich history through a roster of artists and experts. Roland says that it’s an exciting opportunity for visitors to learn more about the company’s synths, speak to three musical icons and even get their hands on some classic Roland vintage gear.

The panel of experts, including Richard Barbieri (Porcupine Tree and Japan), Graham Massey (808 State) and Jody Wisternoff (Way Out West) will all talk about their experiences creating electronic music as well as discussing their favourite Roland synths. They’ll also be on hand to answer questions and chat to visitors after the event. All three guests are intrinsically linked to the history of the synthesizer. Richard Barbieri’s first ever synth was the Roland System 700, and he’s never looked back. His band, Japan, notched up numerous hits in the ’80s and they became a cornerstone of the influential synth-pop movement.

Graham Massey infamously named his band ’808 State’ after the famous Roland TR-808 drum machine, which – along with the TB-303 – was an essential component to the way the band produced their music.

Jody Wisternoff uses a stable of Roland synths, including the Juno-106 and the legendary Jupiter-8, to make progressive house and breaks as one half of Way Out West. Their music didn’t just hit the charts, it also found its way into TV shows and video games.

Guests will also have the chance to get their hands on some rare and ultra-covetable Roland gear, including the following: Jupiter-8, Juno-60, Jupiter-6, Jupiter-4, Juno-106, JX-8P, D-50, JD-800, JV-1080, JP-8000 and XV-5080.

Dates and Venues

  • 26 Nov. – The Roland Music Academy, Walsall College, Walsall
  • 28 Nov. – The Roland Music Academy, Ealing, Hammersmith & West London College
  • 29 Nov. – Huddersfield University, Huddersfield

Pricing and Availability:
Free but spaces are limited and demand is high (two tickets per person)

More information:

The Foundation Of Synthesis: Control Voltage

October 9, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Additional videos for this title: http://j.mp/SZauJ3
The Foundation Of Synthesis 104: Control Voltage by The Bob Moog Foundation
Video 1 of 22 for The Foundation Of Synthesis 104: Control Voltage

Marc Dotylead educator for The Bob Moog Foundationis back with a series of tutorials in this course on Voltage Control.

But what is Voltage Control and how do you use it in the world of hardware synths? Well, here’s the story: In the early days of sound synthesis, if you wanted your sounds to change or evolve in any way whatsoever, you had to do it manually. Need the pitch to go up? Grab the the oscillator knob and turn it! Want the volume to change? Again, grab the volume knob! What about sequencing a series of notes? Well, before voltage control, you had to record every pitch onto magnetic tape and cut them all together in the order and rhythm that you wanted. It was hard work to create electronic music way back when!

Voltage control forever changed all that! And in this course Marc Doty shows how different hardware synth designers harness the power of VCs to transform and supercharge electronic music composition. Taken one step further you’ll see how Voltage Control was the mother of MIDI… and we all know how powerful MIDI is!

Bob Moog was an early pioneer and inventor of voltage-controlled analog synthesizers. He revolutionized the music industry and his ideas, inventions and musical instruments have dominated the sound of music for more than 30 years. Aside from being an innovator, Dr. Bob was an outspoken advocate of education. The Bob Moog Foundation, created by his daughter, Michelle Moog-Kousa, continues his legacy with Dr. Bob’s SoundSchool, the preservation of his inventions and the development of the Moogseumthe only museum of its kind dedicated to the advancement of sonic education. We hope you will help support the BMF’s efforts by watching these courses with the knowledge that a large portion of the proceeds go to support their awesome efforts!

So sit back, hit the play button, and proceed on your journey into the Foundation of Synthesis with Marc Doty, and the Bob Moog Foundation. Be sure to watch all 6 of the BMF’s courses on filters, modulation, oscillators, sound design and more!
More info on this title: http://j.mp/SZauJ3

Kraftwerk: Publikation – Biography by David Buckley

August 31, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Omnibus Press presents a new and major biography of the first-ever all-electronic pop group, Kraftwerk, one of the most influential bands in popular music history. David Buckley examines the cult enigma that is Kraftwerk! The inner workings of this most secretive of bands are revealed through interviews with friends and close associates. The story of their incredible impact on modern music is traced up to the present day using interviews with a host of musicians, from original electro pioneers such as Gary Numan and the Human League to contemporary acts still in awe of the original Man Machines.

3.5 ‘Tomorrow Belongs To Those Who Can Hear It Coming’

It wasn’t just young would-be musicians who were listening either. The old guard were listening too. In 1975, modern music’s most important icon, David Bowie, was listening hard to Kraftwerk. Receiving an endorsement from Bowie, at the time the most innovative and critically lauded rock star on the planet, was a big deal. It’s hard now to imagine how influential David Bowie was in the seventies and early eighties. Far and away the most sought after interviewee by the UK music press, his every move was scrutinised, his every word picked over by an adoring audience.

Not that 1975 was personally a good year for Bowie. Commercially, he had never been more popular. ‘Fame’, an unlikely collaboration with John Lennon, became his first US number one, and a re-released ‘Space Oddity’ from 1969 would top the UK charts later that autumn. But physically and emotionally, Bowie was a man of shellac, ready to shatter into pieces, addicted to cocaine and obsessed with the occult. However, amongst the nonsequiturs and ridiculous assertions in his interviews, Bowie was, once again, picking up on a massive shift within modern music. He felt that rock, as a statement, was over. His music of the time, dubbed by its creator ‘plastic soul’, was his first attempt to break free from rock cliché. His second attempt, more fully realised, and much more artistically successful, would be just around the corner. ‘Rock ’n’ roll certainly hasn’t fulfilled its original promise,’ he told Anthony O’Grady in August of that year. ‘The original aim of rock ’n’ roll when it first came out was to establish an alternative media speak voice for people who had neither the power nor advantage to infiltrate any other media or carry any weight, and cornily enough, people really needed rock ’n’ roll. And what we said was that we were only using rock ’n’ roll to express our vehement arguments against the conditions we find ourselves in, and we promise that we will do something to change the world from how it was. We will use rock ’n’ roll as a springboard.’ Bowie continues: ‘But it’s just become one more whirling deity, right? Going round that never-decreasing circle. And rock ’n’ roll is dead … It’s a toothless old woman. It’s really embarrassing.’

More info here >>

3-minute Preview: Official DEVO Documentary

August 22, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

This 3-minute preview is the perfect bite-sized length to de-evolve the uninitiated. Produced in cooperation with DEVO, this authorized feature-length documentary has been in development for 3 years. Although the band has been notoriously secretive for nearly 4 decades, they granted us unprecedented full-access to their personal inner-workings and daily lives while on the road, backstage, and at home. Featuring new interviews with contemporaries (Iggy Pop), and fans (Dave Grohl, Tony Hawk), the official film reveals the truth about this important and misunderstood band. From their mysterious origins during the 1970 Kent State shootings to their latest album and tours, this film tells the funny and fascinating story of de-evolution.

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