Boulanger Labs: csSpectral – Sneak Peek

June 2, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Sneak peek from the studio featuring the sampling techniques from the new Csound-based iOS app by Boulanger Labs, csSpectral. Deepak Gopinath (Lead iOS Developer) is using csSpectral to play back a simple beat and transforms the rhythms into a unique percussion track that morphs beyond glitch. This aspect of the app is well-suited for many applications ranging from advanced sound design for film to a mashup of your favorite track.

Sonographic Sound Processing in Max/MSP and Jitter

April 25, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

All sounds in the video are a consequence of spectral processing of female voice.

More info:

http://cycling74.com/forums/topic.php…

SoundWorks Collection – The Sound and Music of Oblivion

April 20, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

In this exclusive SoundWorks Collection profile we talk with visionary Director Joe Kosinski about the sound and music of his new film “Oblivion”. Also featured are Kosinski’s behind-the-scenes collaborators include Composer Joseph Trapanese, M83’s Anthony Gonzalez, and Re-recording Mixer Gary Rizzo, and Re-recording Mixer Juan Peralta.

Tom Cruise stars in Oblivion, an original and groundbreaking cinematic event from the visionary director of TRON: Legacy and producers of Rise of the Planet of the Apes. On a spectacular future Earth that has evolved beyond recognition, one man’s confrontation with the past will lead him on a journey of redemption and discovery as he battles to save mankind. 2077: Jack Harper (Cruise) serves as a security repairmen stationed on an evacuated Earth. Part of a massive operation to extract vital resources after decades of war with a terrifying alien threat who still scavenges what’s left of our planet, Jack’s mission is almost complete.

In a matter of two weeks, he will join the remaining survivors on a lunar colony far from the war-torn world he has long called home. Living in and patrolling the breathtaking skies from thousands of feet above, Jack’s soaring existence is brought crashing down after he rescues a beautiful stranger from a downed spacecraft. Drawn to Jack through a connection that transcends logic, her arrival triggers a chain of events that forces him to question everything he thought he knew. With a reality that is shattered as he discovers shocking truths that connect him to Earth of the past, Jack will be pushed to a heroism he didn’t know he contained within. The fate of humanity now rests solely in the hands of a man who believed our world was soon to be lost forever.

For more exclusive videos check out SoundWorksCollection.com
Join the SoundWorks Collection Vimeo Channel: vimeo.com/channels/soundworkscollection

Recommended watching: Amazing Water & Sound Experiment #2

March 14, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

And here are all the details:

Download the song in this video

Song Name: Monolith

iTunes:
https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/mon…

Amazon:
http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_nos…

Ever since I created the first version of this video a year ago I’ve been wanting to try it again with more water and better lighting / footage. This is a really fun project and when you first see the results, chances are your jaw will drop. The main thing to keep in mind for this project is that you need a camera that shoots 24 fps.

The effect that you are seeing can’t be seen with the naked eye. The effect only works through the camera. However, there is a version of the project you can do where the effect would be visible with the naked eye. For that project, you’d have to use a strobe light.

For this project you’ll need:

A powered speaker
Water source
Soft rubber hose
Tone generating software
24 fps camera
Tape.

Run the rubber hose down past the speaker so that the hose touches the speaker. Leave about 1 or 2 inches of the hose hanging past the bottom of the speaker. Secure the hose to the speaker with tape or whatever works best for you. The goal is to make sure the hose is touching the actual speaker so that when the speaker produces sound (vibrates) it will vibrate the hose.

Set up your camera and switch it to 24 fps. The higher the shutter speed the better the results. But also keep in the mind that the higher your shutter speed, the more light you need. Run an audio cable from your computer to the speaker. Set your tone generating software to 24hz and hit play.Turn on the water. Now look through the camera and watch the magic begin. If you want the water to look like it’s moving backward set the
frequency to 23hz. If you want to look like it’s moving forward in slow motion set it to 25hz.

Four tape recorder techniques for minimal techno: looping, delay, reverse delay and saturation

February 28, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

A lot of nice old retro gear in this video :-)

four tape recorder techniques for minimal techno:
1) a tape loop system (1 recorder, top right)
2) long delay (2 recorders: top left and middle right)
3) reverse delay (bottom middle)
4) tape feedback/tape saturation on system 1, 2 and 3

The tascam 8 track is not doing anything here.. except being a rather expensive table for two other recorders,

“btw. the video in the second part doesn’t really match the music, the camera fell so I couldn’t use the original.. I wasn’t doing all that much except for letting the long tape delay saturate on itself for a very very long time…”

KORG-iMS-20 – How To Create “Niagara Falls” Sound Effects

February 21, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

From scratch and in just a few steps nice and slow,watch the Korg ims-20 transform into a strong water fall~watch footage of Niagara Falls come into view.
Footage: Creative Commons Attribution license (reuse allowed)

iOS stuff: Roland CUBE Lite MONITOR

February 15, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

http://youtu.be/3k1MRkV-dRU

Sing, Play, and Practice with Your Favorite iOS Devices
http://www.rolandconnect.com/product….
Featuring mic and instrument inputs, iOS interfacing, and a quality 2.1 Channel audio system, the CUBE Lite MONITOR is perfect for enjoying music at home with your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch. Connect your iOS device to the i-CUBE LINK jack, and then launch the free CUBE JAM app to play, record, and take advantage of great practice tools like speed/pitch adjustment, Center Cancel for minus-one tracks, and more.

“Inside the Grid on Altair IV” – A One-Note One-Patch Soundscape in Absynth 5

December 23, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

My Colorado based electro friend Mark Mosher explores Absynth 5, details below:

“Inside the Grid on Altair IV” is a soundscape created with one patch from scratch using the virtual synthesizer Absynth 5. It is performed be pressing and holding a single note for the entirety of the song. While I have used Absynth as the sole instrument for songs in the past (Tracks 3 & 4 on my last album markmosher.bandcamp.com/album/no-ghosts-just-fear), I’ve never created a patch where one held note triggers the entire composition. Recent works by Absynth creator Brian Clevinger and artist Anthony Distefano have inspired me to do start working on some pieces of this nature and this is my first of many to come.

The audio is CD quality, and the video shows a behind-the-scenes look at Absynth’s wonderful 68-stage modulatable envelopes in action. So all the movement and changes in dynamics, pitch, timber are meticulously drawn and programmed as part of the patch. The envelopes also support LFOs on segments. The envelopes can be extremely long and also loop independently which making Absynth fantastic for evolving soundscapes.

Note, I am also using an envelope to change the “effect time” of the Pipe Effect which is a unique audio effect within Absynth. P. 88 of the manual describes it best “Let’s take the image of a string. A loudspeaker (a contact loudspeaker) is connected to a string, which begins to vibrate as a result. You can determine the position of this virtual loudspeaker on the string via the parameter Input Position. Above the string are two pickups, similar to an E-Guitar. The pickups’ positions can be determined through the parameter Output Positions. Changing those two parameters can be compared with changing two microphones. You can modulate the string’s length and the pickups’ position through the LFOs or a MIDI Controller. This way, various flanging, pitch-shifting and rotary speaker effects can be achieved. These effects are particularly apparent when the modulation of the pickups are modulated in op¬posite directions.”

Diego Stocco – Transformed Rain

December 5, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Diego Stocco has released another sound design video work, the meditative Transformed Rain.

Here’s what he has to say about it:

Few days ago I was working on a new instrument and needed to pick up some tools from my work table outside. It was a rainy day.

While I was sorting through the tools, I started hearing a faint tonal rhythm that reminded me of ethnic percussions and wondered where it was coming from. It was the rain hitting a metallic trash bin that I had left upside down in front of the working table.

I stopped for a moment and focused my attention on the sound.

Besides the percussive noise of the rain, I started hearing some overtones, so I got inspired to create a piece by expanding the tonal resonances present within that sound. No additional instruments or samples. I hope you’ll enjoy it!

Beach Sampling | Music made with sand, rocks & water

November 10, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

A short video showcasing sound design techniques. The music and sound design were created by using exclusively vocal recordings and sounds of found objects, all recorded at a beach. Location: Kalamitsi-Halkidiki (GR)

Video, Music, Sound Design, Vocals \\\ John Valasis {johnvalasis.com}
Female Vocals, Support \\\ Vittoria Volovik

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