OldSkoolVerb 2.0 – new freeware algorithmic reverberation effect plugin

March 14, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Voxengo has announced the release of OldSkoolVerb 2.0, a freeware algorithmic reverberation effect plugin for Windows and Mac.

OldSkoolVerb now supports most user interface features latest Voxengo plugins offer, including undo/redo history, preset manager, user interface coloration and others.

Most importantly, this updated version 2.0 features an improved reverb algorithm which became more robust, more stereo-balanced and more parametrically flexible.

OldSkoolVerb is available to download as a freeware effect plug-in for Windows and Mac (VST/AU).

More info here >>

Space Echo Spring Reverb

February 18, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Just a short video with the spring reverb from the Roland Space Echo series.
This particular reverb comes from the RE-301, but as far as I know, the RE-201, 301 and 501 has the same reverb.
I removed the spring reverb when I had to fix one of my units. I’ve placed it in the box again, don’t worry.

The sequence was programmed on a Korg Mono/Poly

I love the text on the reverb tank. “Manufactured by beautiful girls in Milton, Wis. under controlled atmosphere conditions.”

More background information on the topic:

The Roland RE-201, commonly known as the Space Echo, is an audio analog delay effects unit produced by the Roland Corporation.

A tape echo device records incoming audio to a loop of magnetic tape, then replays the audio over a series of several playback heads before it is erased again by new incoming audio. The tape used in the RE-201 is the standard 1/4″ tape of the open-reel variety, but made as one, continuous loop. In the Roland ‘RE’ range there are no reels of any kind, the tape is transported via a capstan drive. The tape loop is contained in a loose, constantly moving jumble in the tape chamber (also known as the tape tank) under a plastic panel which protects the tape and keeps it from getting tangled. The replacement tapes were known as Roland RT-1L replacement tape loops and sold by Roland.

There are several control dials on the device that alter such aspects as tape speed, repeat pattern (an 11-position rotary switch), one instrument and two microphone inputs, a single analog backlit VU meter for all three inputs, wet/dry mix for both echo and reverb, and intensity (number of repeats, in a sense; it actually reduces how much the erase/record head erases the tape), that can be adjusted to a user’s liking; and bass/treble controls to EQ the sound of the repeats (not the dry signal), as well as dry and effected “Echo” output jacks with a switch for output setting (-10, -20, -35db levels.)

Used as a delay/echo, the Roland RE-201 is said to produce an unpredictable delay that is warm and gritty sounding. It is also capable of producing a large variety of its own sound effects, even without an input signal (by turning the intensity control to maximum and allowing the unit to self-regenerate, or self-oscillate, while manipulating the tape speed and other controls).

Despite its age, the Roland RE-201 is widely sought after, and still used by many bands to this day, notably in the experimental work of Radiohead, and the rockabilly stylings of Brian Setzer, the latter using one recently to get the slapback sound sought after for rockabilly and such styles of music. The Roland RE-201 is also extensively used in modern electronic music

Sci-Fi Music: The Adventures of Captain Sausage

February 6, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

http://youtu.be/j__oRPAruqk

A short improvisation featuring processed audio from a really bad Sci-Fi movie, HP and BK sine wave generators, ring modulators, tape echo, various effects, and a dash of reverb.

www.facebook.com/AtomicShadow

Atomic Reverb – new algorithmic reverb effect plug-in

December 6, 2011 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Molecular Bytes has released Atomic Reverb, an algorithmic reverb effect plug-in for Windows.

Evolved high-technology – atomicreverb represents one of the currently most modern room and reverbation processors. Sophisticated algorithms combined with a clear and friendly user-interface completes this powerful effect plug-in.

With its unique combination of algorithms, you can design acoustic room patterns in every conceivable way and for exactly the required purpose.

And if you want it quicker, select any of the predefined and categorized presets (more than 150 available!)

Atomic Reverb features

  • Superior smooth and dense reverb tail.
  • Optionally infinite density tail (limited by sample rate).
  • Double precision, full 64Bit internal signal processing zero Latency.
  • Room-Size reconstructions and spatial emulation, incoherent Stereo.
  • Acurate reality using simulated airflow movement.
  • Graphical displays to visualize reverb settings.
  • Adjustable gated reverb duration.
  • 5 Band equalizer.
  • 170+ changeable early-reflection signatures to create individual room sounds.
  • 150+ factory presets.
  • Clear and easy preset-browser, handling different categories.
  • User and factory preset grouping.

Atomic Reverb for Windows (VST) is available to purchase for the introductory price of 69 EUR until December 31, 2011 (regular 119 EUR).

Get it here >>

AtomicReverb – new algorithmic room and reverb effects processor

December 3, 2011 · Posted in Uncategorized · 1 Comment 

MolecularBytes has released AtomicReverb, a new algorithmic room and reverb effects processor.

With its unique combination of algorithms, AtomicReverb is designed to make it possible to design acoustic room patterns in every conceivable way and for exactly the required purpose. By supporting non-static calculation in contrast to convolution effects, infinite density, simulated air movement and full 64 bit signal processing AtomicReverb sounds very natural. In contrast to convolution or impulse-response related reverbs, AtomicReverb does not use static models. Every process renders reflections like in the reality – with all its disturbs and dynamics.

AtomicReverb provides highly configurable processing for early reflections and reverberation (late-reverb). This allows creating sounds from subtle reverbs over full and dense halls to dominant rooms or even tubes. It also lets you choose from over 170 different predefined early-reflection signatures, which are additionally changeable in size, hardness and resonance. The reverberation (or ‚late-reverb’) processing – the dense ‘floor’ of a reverberation – allows you to create infinite density, airflow movement simulation and even gated tail length (usefully for percussive sounds). With parameters like “absorption” and “reflection” effects are also possible which are not found in other reverbs.

Currently, the plug-in is available as a 32- and 64-bit version for Windows – a Mac version is planned, but a release date is not set yet.

Price: 119 Euros. There is an introductory price of 69 Euros valid until December 31, 2011. A free trial version and user manuals are available for download on the developer’s website.

Features:

  • Superior smooth and dense reverb tail
  • Optionally infinite density tail (limited by sample rate)
  • Double precision, full 64Bit internal signal processing
  • zero Latency
  • Room-Size reconstructions and spatial emulation, incoherent Stereo
  • Acurate reality using simulated airflow movement
  • Graphical displays to visualize reverb settings
  • Adjustable gated reverb duration
  • 5 Band equalizer
  • 170+ changeable early-reflection signatures to create
    individual room sounds
  • 150+ factory presets
  • Clear and easy preset-browser, handling different
    categories
  • User and factory preset grouping

Nebula Space Reverb VST from Minimal System Instruments

November 28, 2011 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Minimal System Instruments has released Nebula (Space Reverb), a VST plug-in for Windows:

Reverb is one of the most commonly used effects in music production and every producer should have an array of various reverb effects at their disposal. Developed over the last 9 months Nebula is a true labour of love for Minimal System Instruments and we are confident this is reflected in the quality of the plugin both in terms of sound and control and also visually. Nebula can be used to create standard reverb effects but it really excels when used to create stunning atmospheric sounds from something as simple as a single drum hit. When used with more complex loops and sounds the possibilities are endless.

Techno Producer ‘Psionzfikshun’ was a BETA tester throughout the whole development process and here is what he had to say about Nebula:

“Being involved in the testing of Nebula from the beginning has been a real privilege, this was a constantly evolving product and was very exciting to work on. Nebula sounds great, it can be used on drums to add space and character or it can transform any sound into a lush soundscape. I also love how the sound morphs when automating the parameters. I now use Nebula on every track”

Nebula has been tested and works in Cubase, Sonar, Ableton Live, FL Studio, Reaper, Energy XT and works without issue. It is recommended that you always try out the demo before purchases to ensure that the plugin is compatible with your system.

Nebula costs £19.99 and is available now from www.minimalsystem.com

Buchla & R880 mix by Foxx companion Benge

November 5, 2011 · Posted in Uncategorized · 2 Comments 

Here’s his statement of the use of reverbs :-)

I have a lot of reverb units – I love them! They fascinate me because they take your sound and they put it into a 3D space, and they all do it in their own unique way. They have evolved so much over the years, starting off with analog springs and metal plates, through early and very clever digital algorithmic processors and onwards through the growing bit depths. My favourites are the EMT 140 stereo plate, the Lexicon 224, Yamaha Rev1 and the Telefunken Echomixer mono spring thing. I bought a Roland R880 years ago really cheap which was their attempt (in 1988) at a supa-mega-reverb and it is an extremely underrated unit actually. So I took it home so I could experiment putting a Buchla through it. I had a hunch that they would sound good together! I spent a few hours re-aquainting myself with its shocking operating system (which was like that scene in Contact where they build the spaceship based on blueprints deciphered from an alien language downloaded from outer space)

Anyway – here is a live tweak of the Buchla and R880 together

Ursa Major Space Station

October 19, 2011 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

The Space Station, or SST-282, was described as a “reverberation effect.” It could apparently get reverb times of up to 3.5 seconds. This may not seem like a particularly long time by modern standards, but it was a huge achievement given the architecture that was used. In the SST-282, the reverb effect was obtained by using a single delay line, with 15 output taps from the delay buffer summed and used for feedback, and an additional 8 taps used to monitor the delay line. Multitap delay lines such as this, where several taps are summed and used for feedback, can quickly reach a high reflection density. However, they are notoriously unstable, with the maximum feedback gain being allowed under conventional circumstances being equal to 1 divided by the number out output taps.

The heart of the new Space Station is a single 140MHz Motorola DSP chip programmed with faithful recreations of the original Space Station’s algorithms, some updated versions, plus the new Room reverb. The unique aspect, though, is that the unit is packaged in a slim panel with wooden side cheeks, which is designed to sit on a desk. It measures just 165 x 127 x 150mm (hwd) and weighs next to nothing, with a four-metre connecting cable which terminates in a pair of XLR connectors and a compact universal mains power supply. The latter accepts the usual IEC mains lead and operates on AC voltages from 90V to 260V, consuming less than one Watt of power.

Audio connections are provided only in digital form, with stereo AES input and output provided on flying XLR connectors. The SST206 is a stereo output device, like the original, but where it differs is that it accepts a stereo source where the original was a mono-input device. However, the stereo input is a convenient by-product of adopting the AES input format, and the stereo input is summed to mono to feed the delay/reverb processor. A dedicated Dry Level control allows a percentage of the stereo source signal to be passed through to the stereo outputs, if required.

The unit is optimised for use at a 48kHz sampling rate with 24-bit resolution. It will also operate happily at 44.1kHz and even 32kHz — although the control calibration will be inaccurate at these lower sample rates since the delay and decay times are related to the sampling rate. Similarly, it can also be used at 88.2kHz and 96kHz (but only with the SST Reverb and Echo programs), with proportionally shorter delay and decay times again.

Valhalla DSP updates ValhallaRoom reverb effect to v1.0.8

September 16, 2011 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Valhalla DSP has updated ValhallaRoom, a versatile, true stereo algorithmic reverb for Windows and Mac.

It features nine original reverberation algorithms (including the latest Dark reverb modes, Nostromo and Narcissus), and has been designed from the ground up to produce a wide range of natural reverberation sounds. Sounds range from tight ambiences and rooms, through traditional hall and plate sounds, all the way up to vast modulated spaces. The algorithm designs have been influenced by some of the “classic” room simulation boxes, as well as state of the art modern theory.

Changes in ValhallaRoom v1.0.8

  • Resizable GUI. Make it really tiny, or super huge, or some sane place in between.
  • Two new reverb modes, Nostromo and Narcissus. These are “Dark” modes, with reduced high frequency content. The emphasis is on slowly building echo density and maximum spaciousness. Narcissus also featured a much lower CPU usage than the other reverb modes.

ValhallaRoom for Windows and Mac (VST/AU) is available to purchase for $50 USD.

  • Unique Early reverb section allows user to dial in subtle and short bursts of early reverberation energy, as well as gated reverbs up to 1 second in length.
  • The Late section produces natural reverb decays ranging from 0.1 seconds to 100 seconds. The decay can be controlled in 3 adjustable frequency bands.
  • Both Early and Late reverb sections have adjustable modulation, to produce sounds ranging from lush chorusing, to subtle and natural long decays.
  • ValhallaRoom is true stereo. The Early and Late reverb sections are both stereo-in, stereo-out. The spread of energy between the stereo channels can be controlled over time, which helps preserve the input spatial image.
  • The GUI has been designed for easy navigation, and is inspired by Joseph Müller-Brockmann, NASA control panels, and Sesame Street.
  • New in version 1.0.8: Resizable GUI. Make it really big, or really tiny, or whatever suits you best.
  • A comprehensive preset browser makes saving, recalling and sharing settings easy.
  • Nine original reverberation algorithms:
    • Large Room – designed to emulate big rooms with a wide spatial impression, with smooth “detuning” modulation
    • Medium Room – sparser than Large Room, with a more random modulation
    • Bright Room – a lush, shinier-than-life reverb, with deep modulation and a somewhat slower attack
    • Large Chamber – a smooth decay with consistent high echo density and subtle detuning modulation
    • Dark Room – a new reverb mode added to V1.0.6. A hybrid between the grungy early digital reverbs and the modern algorithms found in ValhallaRoom, with reduced high frequency content, noisy yet lush randomized modulation, a HUGE spatial image, echo density ranging from grungy to dense while retaining clarity, and tons of mojo.
    • Dark Chamber. Similar to the original Large Chamber algorithm, but bigger and darker, with deeper detuning modulation.
    • Dark Space. A HUGE dark space, with a somewhat sparser early echo density and deep detuning modulation.
    • Nostromo (new in version 1.0.8). Deep, dark, echoing reverb. Very sparse early echo density, slow density build, random modulation, wide spatial image.
    • Narcissus (new in version 1.0.8). Dark, lush, wide, with random modulation that quickly builds into rich chorusing. The little sibling of Nostromo, but it is still big. Designed for low CPU consumption.

ValhallaRoom has been designed from a psychoacoustic perspective. Instead of creating a simplified physical model of a simplified physical space, VRoom generates early and late acoustic energy that provides the spatial and phase cues needed to create an “idealized” room impression.

Get it here >>

What reverb should I use?

June 17, 2011 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Sound designer Varun Nair has published a comparison of the sound of multiple convolution reverb plugins, including:

  • AudioEase Altiverb
  • McDSP Revolver
  • TL Space
  • Waves IR1
  • Logic’s Space Designer
  • Voxengo Deconvolver

Convolution Results by ntkeep

Here is a summary of his findings;

The results are definitely interesting! Each plugin seems to be treating the IR very differently. Altiverb & TL Space sound closest to the source and also sound similar. Revolver seems to have some sort of smearing again. Waves IR1 sounds more “wet”. Space Designer has a lopsided image again in addition to having a little more depth (not as upfront as Altiverb and TL Space). It’s also interesting to compare these results with the ones above.

Details on Nair’s experiments and audio examples at the Re-Sounding site.

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