Synth Answer No. 1 = Studio Electronics Midimoog

October 22, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

So Studio Electronics Midimoog was the right answer. It is actually a real Minimoog (original Minimoog boards) in a different (19″) housing with MIDI. Fabulous machine!!!

The Midimoog is an excellent resurrection of the Minimoog by Studio Electronics, a company that has shown with its ATC-1 Tone Chameleon that they can emulate the classic synths. Remaining faithful to the original design, circuitry and components, Studio Electronics has recreated the original in a new rackmount MIDI equipped unit. Every unit has a genuine Minimoog Model D board inside. They’ve added a new dedicated LFO in addition to the Midi. Unfortunately, due to the 100% analog design of this synth, including the analog pots and switch controllers, retrofitting patch memory to the original Minimoog boards would have been a major electronic undertaking. So just like the original Minis, there is no patch memory storage.

The front panel layout of the Midimoog strongly resembles the Minimoog’s original design. Familiar to old Minimoogers and fairly easy to learn and explore for the newer users. As for the sounds… they’re the real thing. Three oscillators power this monophonic analog beast to create fat and warm synth basses, leads, blip-bleeps and sweeping sounds. The classic 24 dB/oct lowpass Moog filter is here too, and just as powerful as always. The rack-mountability and MIDI implementation alone make this an excellent choice for anyone looking for the famous warm Moog sounds in a compact yet classic MIDI-equipped module.

Minimoog, Memorymoog, LinnDrum 1 & 2

September 9, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

A live “dreamy” improvisation on Minimoog, Memorymoog, and LinnDrum.
Minimoog: synth bass
Memorymoog: synth
LinnDrum: drum machine

“Another, more “hypnotic” and laidback live jam on Minimoog, Memorymoog and Linndrum. My silly camera decided to stop recording the video after 10 seconds, so I placed a photo of the gear. Listen to this one in low lights ;-)”

1972 Moog MINIMOOG model D explanation, early years progressive music

September 8, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

A little demonstration of the early RA Moog Minimoog from 1972, the italian group PREMIATA FORNERIA MARCONI. You can see plexy wheels, squared bottom case and fat sound of the old oscillator board

MOOG Minimoog “SuperMoto”

September 8, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Vintage synthesizer demo track, details below:

bass, lead, drum, sequencer and fx sounds: Moog Minimoog with Lintronics Midi
pads, strings: Roland Juno-60
motorcycle engine: Suzuki DR-Z 400 SM
recording multi-track
fx: reverb and delay

The Lintronics MIDI Converter (“LMC”) is a feature-rich, high-performance MIDI interface that is designed specifically to place the expressive potential of the Minimoog and certain other monophonic analog synthesizers under MIDI control. Designed by Rudi Linhard (who also designed the Lintronics Advanced Memorymoog Modification), the LMC uses state-of-the-art digital circuitry and software. It includes an internal Low Frequency Oscillator (LFO), which can be used in addition to, or in place of the host synth’s LFO. Pitch, pitch bend, filter cutoff, loudness, modulation amount, and the internal LFO’s (Low Frequency Oscillator) rate and depth, all may be controlled through MIDI in real time and with high resolution. In addition, the Glide and Decay functions may be turned on and off through MIDI. A wide range of controller assignments, keyboard modes, and similar options are accessed through MIDI Program Change commands. And the LMC includes a programmable wide range multiwaveform LFO which can be used in addition to or in place of the host synth’s LFO.

Casio XW-P1 XW-G1 Moog Inspired Set

August 29, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

A quick information video of a new bank of sounds, inspired by the Minimoog.

It is such a classic design and sound that is still sought after today. Casio’s XW-P1 and XW-G1 while being a digital synthesizers can do a pretty remarkable job of mimicking those classic Moog sounds. The Minimoog had 3 oscillators plus a noise generator and although the XW has a 4th oscillator in its Solo Synth engine – all of these sounds were crafted with the original in mind. A set of 10 Leads and basses, the specialties of the Minimoog. Separate versions above for the XW-P1 and XW-G1.

Downloadable at www.casiomusicforums.com

Modular & Minimoog Combination Demo

August 8, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

A classic combination explored, details below:

This was one of the first times I’d played the Modular/Mini combination together. Getting the CV and triggers set up took a little doing. I even had to build an interface circuit for the S-trig connection before I could get it all to work properly.

Native Instruments Monark – Review

June 7, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Monark is Native Instruments latest Reaktor built synth aims to emulate thew classic Mini Moog Model D.

MONARK captures the pure organic sound of the undisputed king of monophonic analog synthesizers. Years of meticulous research capture every nuance of the synth at the center of four decades of popular music. The first choice for bass and lead sounds from electronic and hip hop to indie rock and beyond, no other synth comes close to this combination of power, richness, and musical tone. Delivering the true sound of a synth as famous as the artists who used it, MONARK is the holy grail of analog modeling.

Model-A Prototype – Built in 1969. This version more closely resembles the modular Moog’s but in a very compact form. In its wood case, six Moog designed modules were internally hard-wired together and connected to a small keyboard. Many labels were typed out on paper and taped on to the front panel above the knobs.

Model-B Prototype – Built in 1970. In this version, the modular look was eliminated as the components were brought together by a pupose built front panel lay out. The three identical VCO sections were stacked on top of each other on the left. The right side held the Amplitude and Filter contour controls. The middle section held the Noise, Filter (cutoff, res) and master tuning controls. There was even a power switch on the front.

Model-C Prototype – Built in 1970. This version really begins to look like a Minimoog. The familiar left-to-right layout of Controllers, Oscillator Bank, Mixer, Modifiers and Output sections and the signature pop-up front panel had come to exist. The Model-C was photographed for the original Sales Flyer introducing the Minimoog, although in that flyer it was referred to as the Model-D.

Model-D Prototype – Built in 1970 almost immediately after the Model-C. A few more cosmetic tweaks to the front panel design brought about the last few final touches before readying for commercial production of the official Model-D.

Model-D – Built in 1971. A few more design tweaks (like adding some red rocker-switches and proper pitch-bend and mod wheels) and the Model-D was the Minimoog sold to the public. Interestingly, there are three versions of the Model-D, with some very minor and mainly cosmetic variations to each. Fortunately they can be distinguished from their name-plates.

How to create the 1980s pop ballad sound

May 29, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

One of the typical keyboard-based setups that were used in the ’80s for ballads.
Moog Minimoog: synth bass
Roland TR-808: drum machine
Yamaha DX7: electric piano

Minimoog and 1125 Sample & Hold module – triggering filter

May 21, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Here ‘noddyspuncture’ is using the Sample and Hold on mainly the Filter, but the Oscillators do play a part as well… set to various intervals – unison and also a 3rd and a 5th apart.

Bruno Ender Lee playing Galaxies

May 20, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

BRUNO ENDER LEE – “Galaxies (part 2)” – studio recording May 19. 2013

-stereo-track 1: Absynth 4 – (drone)
-stereo-track 2: Korg Mono/Poly VST (arpeggio)
-stereo-track 3: MiniMoog Voyager OS (bass)
-stereo-track 4: MiniMoog Voyager OS (leads)
-stereo-track 5: Synthesizers.com Studio-88 (effects)
-stereo-track 6: ARP Odyssey (leads & effects)

composed, arranged & produced by Bruno Ender Lee
2013 Velvet Voyage Productions

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