Into space with NASA and Nine Inch Nails

June 5, 2011 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

For all you space fans out there :-)

I truly enjoy outer space. It’s absolutely amazing that we now have the ability to send instruments out into the void of the universe to observe all sorts of interesting things. Asteroids! Moons! Planets! Dark matter! This is the perfect opportunity for a Carl Sagan quote:

“Somewhere, something incredible is waiting to be known.”

The footage in this little film was captured by the hardworking men and women at NASA with the Cassini Imaging Science System. If you’re interested in learning more about Cassini and the on-going Cassini Solstice Mission, check it out at NASA’s website:

saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/​science/​index.cfm

Get to know the “The Swarm” Free Noise Drone Synth

March 21, 2011 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Nice spacy sounds in this one:

It gets loud at moments, so watch your speaker volume : A demo of the new free standalone synth “The Swarm”. Rather unique compared to most other free synths available (Mac too!). I really enjoy the deep tone. Inspired by Leon Dewan’s “The Swarmatron”. A good alternative for people who don’t have several thousand dollars readily available. Obviously, this is no substitute for the real analog version but it does give the user a taste of the massive power of 8 Saws layered and detuned a bit from a central tone. Leon makes some of the most unique analog pieces around. Kontrolled by a Korg “NanoKontrol”

An impressive piece of code.

Check out : http://www.dewanatron.com/

Monolith Low latency guitar Synth plugin Preview

March 2, 2011 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Monolith is a very low latency, guitar driven VST plugin Synthesiser.
This is just a preview of the prototype.
Monolith is planned for release in the spring of 2011.

SynthTronica – synth for iPad – Dynamic Multitouch Filter

March 2, 2011 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Space here we come:

This video demonstrates SynthTronica, the spectral synth by Leisuresonic for the iPad. This episode showcases SynthTronica’s Dynamic Multitouch Filter, an expressive and innovative musical controller, for use in live performance, and for touch sound synthesis.

Synth Architecture

SynthTronica is a hybrid instrument; its synth engine combines characteristics of virtual analog synthesis and digital sampling. For most “traditional” synthesizers, sound evolution is controlled by parametric filters — combinations of VCFs and LFOs. Instead, SynthTronica uses time-varying filter data to provide spectral evolution; an instance of such data is called a “formant”. Formants can be created in several ways, through the iPad’s microphone, importing audio files, and capturing performances of SynthTronica’s multitouch filter. While formants are currently played in strict loops, the maximum formant duration is fairly large — just over 60 seconds — providing potential for significant, albeit prerecorded, variation. The benefit of formants lies with their generality. A formant can be made from sources as disparate and varied as Nord percussion, cellos, choirs, braying donkeys, or the chorus of Katy Perry’s latest single. The latter example is an interesting consideration: a formant can reflect much of the rhythmic and sometimes vocal characteristics of its source sound, while effectively obliterating its pitch. Pitch is instead provided by SynthTronica’s synthesizer front-end. When readily-discernible formant sources are used, SynthTronica provides a unique musical space that lies between the boundaries of pure sound synthesis and referential sampling. Formant synthesis is not explicit like sampling; you play through the Katy Perry groove as if it was your avatar. With SynthTronica, a performer needs to make pitch choices for any sound to be heard.

News from out of space comes from A-ha

February 2, 2011 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

A-ha member presents ‘The Apparatjik Light Space Modulator’

Apart from A-ha, Magne ‘Mags’ Furuholmen has also been involved with the music, art and film project known as Apparatjik since 2008. The project has since released an album and two singles, and performed three concerts in 2010. Now they are preparing for their first large-scale project, to take place in Germany in March including an installation and performances at the Neue Nationalgalerie Berlin. (Tickets for the performances have gone on sale today, 1 February. Note that tickets will be limited to approximately 200 per show, and can be purchased from www.apparatjik.com . If you plan to go, contact us at info@side-line.com ). This project by Apparatjik is to be understood as homage to the legendary Meta-Musik-Festival that took place during the seventies at the Neue Nationalgalerie Berlin. Apparatjik are the musicians Guy Berryman (Coldplay, London), Jonas Bjerre (Mew, Copenhagen), Magne Furuholmen (A-ha, Oslo) and Martin Terefe (London).

The Apparatjik Light Space Modulator is presented as a twofold project: during two weeks the installation can be accessed in the glass hall of the Neue Nationalgalerie and three unique concerts will be performed at the same location (at 9 pm on March 12, March 26, and March 27, 2011). Those performances are inspired by the visual experiments of László Moholy-Nagy. Moholy-Nagy taught at the German Bauhaus, as did Mies van der Rohe who was the architect of the Neue Nationalgalerie Berlin. At the center of both the Apparatjik installation and concerts are moving images that project from a large scale cube into the open glass structure of the building into the city space — a reference to the kinetic Licht-Raum-Modulator created in 1930 by Bauhaus artist Moholy-Nagy.

Apparatjikʼs project will conclude on March 27 with a special interactive composition performed in collaboration with the Deutsches Kammerorchester. This concert is dedicated to Mies van der Rohe on the occasion of the 125th anniversary of his birth.

Read the full story here >>

Electronic Impressionen

November 15, 2010 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

This is a nice space video for Korgator’s  “Time Run” Electronic Impressionen Part III, a track in the Berlin School synth music tradition of artists like Tangerine Dream and Klaus Schulze.

1.Korg Triton Le61: Pad
2.Quasimidi Polymorph: Mellotron
3.Roland JP 8080:Sequence
4.Korg Mono Poly: Lead
Effects from Boss SX 700
Mixer Behringer Xenyx X2442USB
Recorder Zoom H4N

A voyage with ☆ SpacEKrafT ☆

October 31, 2010 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Nice video by SpacEKrafT called SIMULATION______✈

Everything is nicely filmed in a white futuristic kind a way

If you look closely you can see the Bliptronic and the Quasimidi Sirius in action

Space analog monster

July 19, 2010 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Studio Electronics created a synthesizer a while ago, very much inspired by the movie 2001: A space Odyssey, and Hal 9000′s ominous glow. This huge (38 pounds) synth is an anlogue monster, with a beautiful white and black case, and the warm, blue glow of it’s lights makes it absolutely stunning.

The Orion was was custom built for an Argentine gentleman named Antoine de Castellane. Internally, it was a CODE 8 fitted with an overdrive and both ARP 2600 and Yamaha CS80 filters. Antoine did the design of the “space case” on his end, and Tim Caswell did the rest. Antoine has both of the only two in existence.

Here is Studio Electonics’ page on the Orion. They are available to anyone, but very expensive. Still, there would definitely be one of these in my dream studio.

Speaking of dream studios, here are some pictures of Antoine’s studio, just to get you salivating:

The control room:

Via: SG

Zoo Systems – Halo

August 27, 2009 · Posted in Electronic Music · Comment 

New song from Zoo Systems

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xVKSETluhoo]

Check it out

Necessary tribute to Apollo 11

July 17, 2009 · Posted in Electronic Music · Comment 

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RMINSD7MmT4]
Forty years ago, men from Earth began for the first time to leave our home planet and journey to the moon.

From 1968 to 1972, NASA’s Apollo astronauts tested out new spacecraft and journeyed to uncharted destinations.

It all started on May 25, 1961, when President John F. Kennedy announced the goal of sending astronauts to the moon before the end of the decade. Coming just three weeks after Mercury astronaut Alan Shepard became the first American in space, Kennedy’s bold challenge set the nation on a journey unlike any before in human history.

Eight years of hard work by thousands of Americans came to fruition on July 20, 1969, when Apollo 11 commander Neil Armstrong stepped out of the lunar module and took “one small step” in the Sea of Tranquility, calling it “a giant leap for mankind.”

Six of the missions — Apollos 11, 12, 14, 15, 16 and 17 — went on to land on the moon, studying soil mechanics, meteoroids, seismic, heat flow, lunar ranging, magnetic fields and solar wind. Apollos 7 and 9 tested spacecraft in Earth orbit; Apollo 10 orbited the moon as the dress rehearsal for the first landing. An oxygen tank explosion forced Apollo 13 to scrub its landing, but the “can-do” problem solving of the crew and mission control turned the mission into a “successful failure.”

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