Atom – free filter with focus on dynamic, tempo-synchronised modulation

July 7, 2014 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

atom

Sinevibes has released a free Audio Unit plugin –Atom. Atom is a filter with focus on dynamic, tempo-synchronised modulation. It features five different resonant filter types each with three slope settings – up to super-steep -48 dB/octave.

It has two modulators which feature multiple waveforms and run at rates from 1/128 note to 16 bars. Thanks to the chaos function which randomises the amplitude of each modulator cycle, as well as lag switch that smoothens the waveform curves, Atom allows a user to create lively, elaborate filter effects.

Atom is the first Sinevibes plugin to feature a new interface design language that is designed to cleanly present internal components and logical or audio connections between them..

Features:

  • Multi-mode filter with five types and –12/24/48 dB/octave slope steepness.
  • Dual modulators with eight waveforms, per-cycle chaos function and shape lag on/off switch.
  • Advanced transport sync algorithm with support for tempo and time signature automation.
  • Extensive use of OS X Core Animation and Accelerate frameworks for hardware-accelerated graphics and audio processing.

Price: Free.

Get it here >>

Three new Duende Native plug-ins has been released

May 9, 2014 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

ssl_duende-plugin_thumb

 

Solid State Logic has announced that three new Duende Native plug-ins and migration to iLok 2 copy protection are now available online.

The superior audio quality and deep feature set of the SSL Duende Native plug-in range has earned the respect of a very discerning clientele through the years.

The three new plug-ins complement the existing range with two plug-ins (X-Saturator & X-ValveComp) designed to bring some analogue saturation and distortion emulation to your digital DAW and the third (X-Phase) delivering high precision frequency specific phase correction.

The new plug-ins are available now via the SSL web site. To coincide with the new plug-in release SSL has migrated the entire Duende Native plug-in collection to the iLok 2 copy protection system. SSL has also announced a summer release for AAX native versions of the entire suite.

New Duende plug-ins

  • X-Phase is an All-pass Filter plug-in that offers the user manual control and benchmark audio quality. It enables the user to apply a phase shift (sometimes called a phase offset) at a specified frequency within a signal. Unlike other filter types where the gain of selected frequencies is altered, with an All-pass Filter the gain remains unchanged throughout the signal. This is useful for fixing phase problems with microphones when recording: eg overheads causing phase problems when mixed with close mic’s.
  • X-Saturator delivers a stunning range of analogue style distortion effects. It is an emulation of an analogue circuit that introduces either 2nd order valve style or 3rd order transistor style distortion or a blend of the two. At low drive settings the distortion is mild and can add gentle warming to help instruments sit nicely in a mix or to add a little extra edge to help instruments cut through a mix. As drive levels are increased so too is the level of distortion until at high drive levels heavy distortion occurs.
  • X-ValveComp is a fully-featured mono or stereo channel compressor with a full set of classic channel compressor controls and an added ‘valve’ emulation stage. The valve emulation stage sits after the compressor in the signal path and adds a variable degree of primarily 2nd order harmonic saturation and distortion that thickens and colours the sound. The compressor can be switched between Peak or RMS modes and has a full set of standard controls.

X-Phase is available for purchase for £199 GBP/249 EUR/$329 USD. X-Saturator and X-ValveComp are £69 GBP/89 EUR/$119 USD each, with an introductory price of £49 GBP/59 EUR/$85 USD for the first 30 days only. Prices exclude tax.

More info here >>

Shoogler – free Max for Live filter device

May 2, 2014 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

shooglestudios_shoogler_thumb

Shoogle Studios has announced Shoogler, a free Max for Live filter device.

To celebrate the launch of our new Max for Live course we’re giving away this incredible multimode filter device! Featuring:

  • 2 Independent Filter Units
  • Low Pass, High Pass, Band Pass, Band Stop and Peak filter types
  • 4x standard LFO’s and 1x combo to modulate cutoff, Q and gain
  • Full Push compatibility!

The Shoogler device is a free download (requires Facebook like).

More info here >>

Shoogler is an incredibly powerful dual-multimode filter with extensive modulation possibilities. It was developed by Shoogle Studios M4L guru Robert Goldie to demonstrate the type of effect you will be able to build after completing our new Max for Live: Introducer course.

The new filter from Waldorf and Theremini from Moog

January 24, 2014 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

waldorf2pole_angled

“Waldorf’s mystery knob is the filter control from a big filter in a box.
That’s right, Waldorf is introducing a 2-pole filter. And one heck of a 2-pole filter it is:
Filter with cutoff and resonance, but also a Drive setting, Rectify, and switchable between low-pass, band-pass, and high-pass
LFO with Depth and Speed
LFO set to Fast, Slow, and (hilariously) Gemütlich (kinda hard to translate, actually easy-going and slower than slow)
Envelope controls: Attack/Decay/Hold, threshold, a source (hard to tell what that does), and trigger.
And it takes CV for envelope, cutoff, and gate, with jack plugs for input and output.”

theremini_upclose

“Then there’s Moog, who are introducing, as rumored, a new Theremin. And this isn’t just any Theremin: it’s a Theremin that can assist you in keeping things in tune, all whilst looking like a space-age egg from Woody Allen’s Sleeper.
It’s a Theremin with presets. Crazy presets.
It’s a digital instrument with Theremin-style controls. (Readers who speculated, you guessed right.) It’ll upset purists, perhaps, but this is rather cool: it’s based on the unique-sounding Animoog sound engine.
The synth is digital, but the input is analog: classic heterodyning style, then digitized as control signal for the engine. Onboard MIDI, CV output (presumably pre-digitization, in fact), and USB. But that engine gives you more different ways to play.
Yes, there’s a display, scale and root controls, a Presets knob, plus built-in delay. There’s a built-in speaker and headphone jack, as well, for convenience.
Price: US$299 estimated is what we heard on the floor…”

Product descriptions from our colleagues at CDM

Theremini_Render.png

“The Theremini is a re-imagination of one of the oldest electronic musical instrument in history, and Bob Moog’s first love – the theremin. Its design fuses the experience of performing with an instrument you don’t actually touch, with a powerful sound engine derived from Moog’s award winning synthesizer, Animoog. The Theremini guarantees immediate success to any player at any skill level, while providing new ways to experiment with music, education, and gestural control.

Assistive pitch correction allows each player to adjust the instruments level of playing difficulty. At the maximum position, the Theremini will play every note in a selected scale perfectly, making it impossible to play a wrong note. As this control is decreased, more expressive control of pitch becomes possible. When set to minimum, the Theremini will perform as a traditional theremin with analog heterodyning oscillator and absolutely no pitch assistance.

A built in tuner supplies real-time visual feedback of each note as it is played, as well as its proximity to perfection. This is useful for correcting a users playing position, or to educate younger players about pitch and scales.

The presets section allows you to select from 32 wave or wavetable-based patches, store a selected scale & root note, set and recall a specified playing range, and specify per-patch settings for the included stereo delay.

Recessed in the top of the Theremini is a compact speaker perfect for private rehearsal and quick setup anywhere. Silent rehearsal is also possible via front panel headphone jack. Simply plug in ear-buds or headphones and the built in speaker becomes silent.

For live performance and gestural control, the rear panel features two line level audio outputs, a pitch CV output with selectable range, and a mini USB jack for MIDI I/O and connectivity.

Checking out the filter section on the Arturia MicroBrute

November 23, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Here is a demonstration of the sound and functionality of the Arturia MicroBrute filter.

Bass Station II Self Oscillating Filter Demo

November 2, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

John Keston explores the Bass Station II, below his report:

I have recently been trying out a Novation Bass Station II monophonic analogue synthesizer. I am quite impressed with this big sounding synth in a small package. While digitally controlled, Novation have focused on packing in proper synthesis features rather than trying to gloss over the sound with onboard effects. For example, as I have illustrated in the video, the filter self oscillates nicely with a clean sine wave that can be modulated in unique ways especially with distinct features like oscillator slew.

The video starts with the self oscillating filter getting modulated by LFO 2 using the triangle wave. After that I switch to using the sample and hold setting creating the well-known 60s computer sound of random notes. Here’s where it gets interesting though. Once I switch the LFO to sample and hold I start turning up the oscillator slew I mentioned earlier. What this does is variably smooth the wave shapes created by the LFO. You’ll hear this come in at 0:28. It sounds like portamento. At 0:35 I switch the LFO to the square wave, but with the slew on it sounds more like a sine. As I reduce the amount of slew the square wave regains its recognizable character. Next I switch it to the saw tooth wave. The nice thing here is that the LFO amount can go into negative values allowing the saw to be reversed.

Another distinctive feature is the oscillator filter mod setting. This modulates the filter with oscillator 2. Since the oscillators range from subsonic to almost supersonic this feature offers modulation effects that are not possible with the LFOs. At 1:29 you will start to hear the oscillator filter mod come in using a pulse waveform. What makes this interesting is that while oscillator 2 is modulating the filter it can also have the pulse width modulated by LFO 1. This can cause bit-reduction-like effects that can be heard between 1:49 and 2:19. At 2:20 I start tapping the octave and waveform buttons on oscillator 2 illustrating what happens when the modulation source is instantly shifted an octave at a time. After a bit more messing around I added a final, manual filter sweep at 3:20.

http://audiocookbook.org/novation-bas…

Boomstar 4075 sequenced by Doepfer Dark Time

October 10, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

This is a demo of the Boomstar 4075 (ARP 2600 filter) being sequenced by a Doepfer Dark Time. Because of the nature of the demonstration, it could get a little boring during some sections. Pay attention to the subtle changes and you will be impressed. Stay tuned through the whole video to see how much range the Boomstars can cover. This is only a short segment as well, these synths are capable of much more. This is a Perfect Circuit Audio favorite of 2013!

Look out for another Boomstar demo coming soon, this time played by a MIDI controller.

Moog Voyager Filter Step Sequencing

September 29, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

A quick inspirational video showing a nice result from step sequencing the Moog Voyager’s filter cutoff.

Prophet 12 Analog Filter Modulation

September 24, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Exploring filter modulation on the Prophet, details below:

I was able to to borrow a Prophet 12 recently. Since it has analog filters, I thought it might be interesting to do “analog things” to it. This is part of what happened next.

At first I was disappointed when I saw that there were no CV connections, but I soon found that the two pedal inputs can be used with a variety of CV gear.

In this video I have the Koushion Step Sequencer iPad app sending MIDI notes to the Moog Mult-Pedal. The Multi-Pedal converts them to an analog control Voltage which step-sequences the Prophet 12′s filter.

The Moog CP-251 allows us to make multiple copies of the Control Voltage so we can also step-sequence a Moog Voyager and Little Phatty. Learn more at www.experimentalsynth.com

Epoch Dynamic Comb Filter – a new effect plug-in

August 8, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

cerberus_epoch_thumb

Cerberus Audio has announced the release of Epoch Dynamic Comb Filter, an effect plug-in for Windows and Mac.

Epoch Dynamic Comb Filter is a unique alternative to traditional filtering and dynamics processes such as equalizers and compressors.

Unlike most equalizers, Epoch is musically reactive, and Epoch has a wider range of tonal color than most compressors.

The heart of Epoch is its Comb Filter Section which features a 360° Phase Rotator and a Fractional Delay. The filtered signal is applied selectively by Epoch’s bespoke Dynamics Section.

Epoch (VST/AU) is available to purchase for $72 USD (single user) / $86 USD (commercial).

Get it here >>

Next Page »

Get Adobe Flash player