Classic 80’s vintage synths in action – Source, Juno-106, and Drumulator

November 20, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

A jam with three classics of the ’80s – the Moog Source, the Roland Juno-106, and the E-mu Drumulator.
Source = synth bass
Juno-106 = chorus pad with resonance
Drumulator = rhythm
FX = Eventide H3000-D/SE patch 795 “LONG & SMOOTH”

Juno 106 Analog Pad for Ableton Live

November 17, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Free Ableton Live Pack #95 features samples of the Roland Juno 106. Those samples were constructed into an Ableton Live instrument rack to create a lush beautifully vintage sounding pad.

Free Download: http://bit.ly/freesynth95

Collection of over 20 Roland Juno 106 Ableton Instrument Racks: http://afrodjmac.com/2012/04/14/rolan…

Visit his site for more stuff like this, including Live Instrument downloads, tutorials and music! http://www.afrodjmac.com

Roland Juno 60 single synth demo: The Lost Weekend

November 11, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

All sounds from the Roland Juno 60, no midi.

The Roland Juno-60 is a popular analogue 61-key polyphonic synthesizer introduced by Roland Corporation in 1982 and a successor to the slightly earlier Juno-6. Like its predecessor, the Juno-60 has some digital enhancements, used only for clocking the oscillators and for saving and loading patches. This instrument was succeeded by the Roland Juno-106 in 1984. Roland was losing market share with the Juno-6 in competition against the Korg Polysix. Related in features and price-class, the Polysix featured external control and patch memory, which the Juno-6 lacked. These features were quickly added to the Juno-6’s design, which sonically and architecturally did not change notably between the two versions, and then released as the Juno-60.

The Juno-60 synthesizer is a six-voice polyphonic synthesizer. The single digitally controlled oscillator (or DCO for short) per voice gave the Juno-60 a high degree of stability in maintaining tune; most analogue voltage-controlled oscillators (VCOs) of the time would tend to drift in pitch and require re-tuning of the oscillator. The DCO provides sawtooth and square/pulse waveforms as a sound source, in addition to white noise and a square-wave suboscillator pitched one octave beneath the key played. Both of these additional sources can be mixed in with dedicated sliders.

The filters and envelope on the Juno-60 rely on control voltages sent by depressing the keys on the keyboard and were thus analogue. The Juno-60 features a rather distinctive-sounding 24 dB/octave lowpass filter with resonance. Unlike other VCF’s of the day, the Juno-60’s is capable of self-oscillation and thus could be used to some degree as a tone generator in and of itself. The filter section also features controls for envelope amount and polarity, LFO modulation, and keyboard tracking. In addition, a three-position non-resonant highpass filter is provided to thin out lower frequencies.

The signal is then sent through a voltage-controlled amplifier (or VCA) and a simple four-stage ADSR filter envelope.

The Juno-60 provides limited options for modulating the audio signal. A single triangle-wave variable-rate LFO is provided as a modulation source; this can be mixed into the DCO to create vibrato or into the lowpass filter to generate a tremolo effect. The LFO can either be triggered manually by the left hand using a large button above the pitch bend lever or set to engage automatically whenever a key was pressed.

Juno-60 through Sony HR-MP5

November 6, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Background video description:

I originally bought a Sony HR-MP5 multi-effect processor when it came out in the ’90s. It broke irreparably in the early 2000s, and I’ve missed it since. Recently I had the opportunity to buy an HR-MP5 and HR-GP5 (the version for guitar) together as a combo deal, and was taken back in time by listening to the mesmerizing sound of the HR-MP5. Here are a few examples of the great FX of this small but cool machine.

Unlike its more costly cousins, the forgettably named (excuse me while I turn to the front page of the manual to remind me what it’s called) HR-MP5 isn’t a dedicated single-effect unit, but neither does it offer the degree of simultaneous effects processing we’ve come to expect from contemporary multi-effects processors. I like to think of it as the equivalent of two dedicated effects units in one box. The two units, or blocks, can be patched in any order, either in series or parallel, and the routing allows for the processing of two mono signals rather than one stereo or one mono signal, should this be deemed useful. The two individual effects blocks can be set to generate one effect at a time, and both offer a slightly different choice of effects, though 2-band EQ is always available in addition to whatever else the block has to offer. Some of the listed effects are actually combination effects, so the limitation of only two simultaneous effects blocks isn’t as restricting as it might at first appear. For example, Reverse Shift combines something that sounds like reverse reverb with pitch shifting, yet counts as a single effects block.

Early ’80s Italo Electro with SH-1000, ARP Omni-2, Juno-60 and TR-808

October 17, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

The beauty of analog synthesizers.

Playing the Juno 6 and Moog ClusterFlux

September 17, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

“Messing about with a Roland Juno 6 and a Moog Clusterflux.
Juno 6 outputs in mono into the MF-Clusterflux – multitracked 4 times.
The Clusterflux lends a nice evolving texture to the Juno 6, but I think I got carried away and overdid it.”

The Cluster Flux is an ultra-powerful and flexible, sound-sculpting tool for use live or in the studio. Expansive functionality combined with warm, analog sound come from the state-of-the-art all-analog audio signal path. Musical, flexible, playable, and durable, the Cluster Flux is capable of providing classic flanging, chorusing, and vibrato effects, but is also capable of a much wider range of modulated delay line effects than traditional stomp boxes in this class due to the wide range of the front panel controls, the multi-waveform LFO, as well as CV and MIDI Control.

The MF-108M Cluster Flux is more powerful than traditional chorus/flange effects offering musicians the  added modulation of multiple LFO waveforms: Sine, Triangle, Square, Saw, Ramp and Random, to create many kinds of new modulated BBD Delay effects. MIDI IN allows control of Delay Time, Range, Feedback, Output Level, LFO Waveform, LFO Rate, LFO Amount and Mix.

ChipBeat // Junomurder // Roland Alpha Juno 2

August 25, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

ChipBeat // Junomurder // (Trier, August 2013)

Drumtraks, Six-Trak, and Juno-60

August 5, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

A slow piece with Sequential Circuits Drumtraks & Six-Trak, and Roland Juno-60.

Time machine: Demo song featuring the Roland Juno-106

July 7, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Vintage synthesizer demo track by RetroSound
“Analog Days”

all synthesizer sounds: Roland Juno-106 Analog Synthesizer (1984)
drums: Roland TR-707
recording: multi-tracking without midi
fx: a bit reverb

more info: http://www.retrosound.de

Info about the synth:

The Juno-106 is a very common and widely used analog polysynth. It continues to be one of the most popular analog synths due to its great sound and easy programmability. It was the next major incarnation of the Juno-series, following the Juno-60. While it has virtually the same synth engine as the Juno-60, the 106 added extensive MIDI control making it one of Roland’s first MIDI-equipped synthesizers. There was also increased patch memory storage, up to 128 patches instead of the 56 patches available in the Juno-60. However, the Juno-60 is often said to have a slight sonic edge over the more advanced 106. The 60 had the ability to modulate oscillator pulse from its envelope and has a “punchier” sound quality.

The Juno-106 is a six-voice polyphonic and programable analog synth with one digitally controlled oscillator (DCO) per voice. While classic monophonic synths used two or three oscillators to create a fatter sound, the Juno-106 uses built-in Chorus to fatten up its sound to dramatic effect. The nature of its DCO meant it was stable and always in perfect tune but still warm and analog. There is an excellent 24dB/oct analog lowpass filter with plenty of resonance and self-oscillating possibilities and a non-resonant highpass filter. The programable pitch/mod bender can be assigned to control the DCO pitch, VCF cutoff, and LFO amount all at once or individually.

The Juno-106 was the first MIDI equipped Juno and its implementation is quite good. There are 16 MIDI channels available and MIDI SysEx data can be transmitted/received from all the sliders and buttons for total remote control and sequencing capability. A switch on the back of the keyboard, next to the MIDI ports allows the user to switch between three types of MIDI modes: Keyboard and Hold data only; Keyboard, Hold, Bender, Patch selection data; or All data (including SysEx). Most users simply set it to MIDI Function mode 3 and forget it.

This synth is incredibly straightforward and very powerful. It’s SH-series derived panel layout is easy to understand and very hands-on. Use it to generate lush pads, filter sweeps, and funky bass lines and leads. The Juno-106 is an awesome learning tool for anyone new to analog synthesis, as well as an electronic musician’s dream for its warm analog sounds coupled with modern features like MIDI and memory – all at a very reasonable price. And still the Juno-106 has an even cheaper alter-ego in the form of the HS-60 – a hobbyist version with built-in speakers.

Old school Tribal House with TR-909, TR-727, Juno-60, and Midiverb

July 6, 2013 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

A quick live jam in the early ’90s Tribal House style.

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