Chase (Midnight Express) by Moroder – performed by Phoenix-Flare

June 11, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Classic synth track by Giorgio Moroder from the film Midnight Express 1978.

“I’ve performed it using Ableton and a Launchpad to trigger the drum loop and synth midi loops. My Doepfer modular is playing the bassline using the A-105 low pass filter, and the flanged pad is a Prophet-08 going through a TC Electronics Nova Modulator pedal. Lead is on my beloved Minimoog OS through a Mad professor Tiny Orange Phaser and an Electro-Harmonic Memory Boy.”

Voyager – new analogue synth ReFill based on the sounds of the famous Minimoog Voyager

June 6, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

ReasonBanks has announced the release of Voyager, an analogue synth ReFill based on the sounds of the famous Minimoog Voyager synthesizer.

VOYAGER refill provides vivid, dynamic and rich-sounding real analogue leads, bass, polyphonic keys and pads, giving you a new powerful synth in your Reason rack.

Our concept has never targeted the development of the 100% perfect software emulation of Minimoog: it is practically not possible. A sample library is a bit similar to the photo album: they contain series of snapshots. It will sound but never work as the original hardware. Bearing this constraint in mind, we wanted to create a synth in Reason that sounds like a real Moog, but acts like Reason’s instruments.

Voyager features

  • 1.78 GB multi-samples (over 2400 wav files) in 24 bit wav format.
  • All samples are perfectly looped and contain the unity note info for quick and proper automapping.
  • 124 REX loops: melodic bass, arp & noise sequences for KLP (keyboard loop player).
  • 339 NN-19 patches, 412 NN-XT patches, 128 Combinator presets.
  • Refill size: 1.22 GB (24 bit).

The ReFill is available to purchase for the introductory price of 28.80 EUR through June 2012 (regular 36 EUR). Requires Reason 6 or above.

The Minimoog Voyager is a true analog monophonic synthesizer (probably the most expensive one of its kind) and is based entirely on the original classic Minimoog Model D, which was on the production line of Moog Music, Inc. from 1970 to 1982. It’s cased in a beautiful, solid hardwood cabinet with a multi-position hinged control panel.

Just like the original, the Voyager has three analog wide-range voltage controlled oscillators, one noise source, as well as one audio preamplifier for externally-applied audio signals.

Two resonant Moog-style filters are on-board and function in dual lowpass or lowpass/highpass modes and can be modulated by one of the two ADSR envelopes, the LFO, or external control.

Minimoog Voyager is a first class synth; every bit as elegant in look as sound and quality. It is highly streamlined and offers all the functionalities of a modern day (mono)synth with the classic, warm, unforgettable Moog sound.

Get it here >>

BusyBox Synthesizer – like a modular Minimoog Model D

May 31, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Grove Audio has posted information on their BusyBox synthesizer.

This 6MU module contains a complete synthesizer voice and an internal MIDI to CV converter. Internal routing is roughly based on the Moog Minimoog Model D.

An analog routing system controlled by a processor offers alternative routing schemes to extend the usefulness of the unit as a standalone synthesizer. A couple of extra features not found on the Minimoog have been added such as ring modulator, linear FM modulation of the VCOs, and voltage controlled amplifiers on each VCO and external audio sources.

The MIDI to CV converter can produce up to four CV/gate pairs and internal control voltages based on channel control messages from an external sequencer or keyboard controller can extend or replace internal modulation sources for the VCOs, the audio mixer or the filter.

The filter core is a 4 pole low pass filter which feeds a signal matrix and analog switch that allows one of sixteen possible filter modes to be selected. Two envelope generators can be used to modulate parameters of the filter and apply a contour to the main audio output VCA.

The depth of modulation can be controlled by the modulation wheel of a connected MIDI keyboard controller.

Pricing and availability are to be announced.

More info here >>

Simsynth Live | Subtractive Synthesizer

May 3, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

SimSynth Live captures the big multi-oscillator sound of a MiniMoog, and combines it with the warm, fat sound of Oberheim style SVF filters.

The result? Rich strings, wall to wall brass, and fat punchy basses. And we haven’t forgotten techno sounds either. SimSynth Live uses a filter technique that gives the EMPH knob a sound you can crank.

3 oscillators, each with a dual (warm) mode effectively making 6 oscillators

Ring modulator

A dual SVF filter that programs like an old Oberheim SEM, (lets you mix lowpass, bandpass, and highpass)

Two discrete envelopes and an LFO.Stereo chorus effect, (in case 6 oscillators aren’t warm enough)

Studio quality alias free rendering

FX Panel with EQ, Reverb, Phaser & Delay

FL Studio & VSTi versions included

More info here >>

Synth spotting – Astral Odyssey

April 23, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Background data:

BRUNO ENDER LEE – “Astral Odyssey” – composed, arranged & performed by Bruno Ender Lee, April 22. 2012
Pre-recorded live tracks: ARP Odyssey & Doepfer MAQ-sequencer / MiniMoog Voyager OS (bass)
Filmed live tracks: MiniMoog Voyager OS (leads) / Moog Etherwave Theremin / ARP Odyssey (fx-sequence)

2012 Velvet Voyage Productions

Spaceship – electronic music

March 5, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

BRUNO ENDER LEE – “Spaceship” – performed live, March 3. 2012

MacBeth M5N, Doepfer MAQ-sequencer, ARP Odyssey, Synthesizers.com Studio-88, MiniMoog Voyager OS, Moog Little Phatty, Analogue Solutions Vostok, Roland Juno-60, Korg Delta, Korg Polysix, Korg MS 2000
(through 5 different stereo-panning-delays, 4 Behringer DD600 & 1 Boss ME-50)

composed, arranged & produced by Bruno Ender Lee; 2012 Velvet Voyage Productions

The Mini Moog Synthesizer with Herb Deutsch

February 15, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Herb Deutsch, the co-inventor of the first Moog synthesizer discusses the history and functions of the Mini Moog as well as its impact on the music of the time. Deutsch also plays one of his original jazz fusion pieces.

Though its design impacted the industry in a way that set the stage for all the synthesizers that came after it, the Minimoog is probably most famous for its excellent analog sound and arguably the best filters in a portable synth. It featured three oscillators (one of which can be used as an LFO) that could be individually tuned and offered multiple waveforms. The Minimoog is monophonic (only one note can be played at a time) so the three oscillators allow for an incredibly rich sound – three de-tuned oscillators each playing a different waveform can create some pretty thick analog sounds! There are also some very cool modulation possibilities when using one of the oscillators as an LFO.

But you can’t talk about the Minimoog without mentioning its filters. The Minimoog uses a 4-pole (24 dB/oct) low-pass filter with cutoff, resonance, ADS envelope, and keyboard tracking controls. Amazingly, Dr. Moog’s filter design has yet to be surpassed by a better sounding filter. It’s a filter that sounds so warm and smooth that Moog’s rival, ARP, tried to copy it for their 2600 and Odyssey synths.

The Minimoog’s internal wiring configuration and front panel layout has defined the general synthesizer configuration for decades. Every adjustable parameter is so clearly laid out on the front panel that the Minimoog makes a great teaching tool for anyone interested in classic subtractive synthesis. It even has a built-in A-440 tone generator so you can manually tune the oscillators-which is nice since (like mosts analog synths that heat up) the tuning of even this machine can be a little bit unstable. Though input jacks allow you to run your own external audio through the Minimoog’s filters, modulation and amplifier circuits too!

Directed by Michael Sterling

Voyage Into the Unknown – Andy Barrow – Minimoog Voyager XL – Korg Radias – Kawai K4

January 5, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Background information on this video from Andy:

Hi All,

Better late than never. Having issues making anything stick, Fell upon this idea and just went with it…..Suggest a Decent pair of Headphones or Monitors – Turned up!!!

A piece of music that started out in Reason 5 using Dr Rex Loop player, I exported a couple of loops to use in my Cubase Project and worked up from there. This piece was recorded live into Cubase using a total of 8 Tracks of audio. I hope to add more tracks and make it last longer for better effect and pad this piece out with some extra sounds to add to the ambient effect (located somewhere in this track)

Some big Pad sounds from both Kawai and Radias – earning them their right to stay in the studio. The Minimoog giving me that nice deep growling bass I wanted for this music and taking full advantage of the Pitch and Mod Wheels. The Radias and the XL set the theme to start the Music off into the Voyage into the unknown

The main part of this video is of me (apparently struggling) unpacking the Voyager XL – Yes this is a heavy unit and one I did not want to drop, not that it would hurt the Moog, just probably crack the floor :-) Probably the sexiest looking synth ever – if you like the retro look and love analogue (digital is nice …But……)

The very last part of this video with the Drums and Moog – The stereo effect is direct from the Voyager XL by using the Touch Panel to effect change in EG and its Position in the Stereo image – This will form part of the continuation for this piece of Music – Not sure on what direction I am heading in yet with this, needless to say the Moog’s will be out to play

Hope you enjoy this as much as I did putting this together.

Many thanks for dropping by and watching

Andy

What a Polyphonic Arp 2600/Macbeth M5/Minimoog would sound like

January 3, 2012 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Nice experiment :-)

Hooked up my mono synths with my Encore Expressionist and recorded a little video to show of the sound. I had the Acidlab Miami triggering the ARP Sequencer which was sequencing the filter cutoff (making that rhythmic sound in the background). The glidey/squelchy bass is the minimoog model D and the 4 voice poly is made up of the 2 ARP 2600′s and 2 voices from the Macbeth M5 – osc 1 and 3 through filter 1 and oscillator 2 through filter 2. It makes for a rather unsurprisingly fat sound and the expressionist makes it really easy to set everything up (I just need some more long 1/4 cables)! The Acidlab Miami was the drum accompaniment. Anyways, hopefully I can record more soon.

A “duel” between a Minimoog and a Memorymoog

December 31, 2011 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Enjoy

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