Everyone Can Play Music – iMS-20 feature

November 9, 2011 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

In this lesson we play around with some drum synthesis, then synthesizing and recording a bassline.
iMS-20 is available on iTunes: http://goo.gl/Zw8I4

iMS-20 is an analog synth studio; a complete recreation of the Korg MS-20 synth, an analog sequencer, a drum machine, and even Korg’s Kaoss Pad technology. Plus, you can share your songs online via the SoundCloud!

iMS-20 is a complete music production app for iPad. It consists of a complete recreation of the legendary Korg MS-20 analog synth with the patching capability, plus a 16-step analog sequencer based on the Korg SQ-10, a six-part drum machine which can create drum parts by simply tapping the buttons, and a seven-channel mixer with 14 types of effects.

iMS-20 is a complete music production app for iPad, consisting of a complete recreation of the legendary Korg MS-20 analog synth with patching capability, a 16-step analog sequencer based on Korg’s SQ-10, a six-part drum machine with dedicated pads, and a seven-channel mixer with 14 types of effects.

In addition, iMS-20 offers dual Kaoss Pads allowing you to generate music by simply stroking the pad and moving your fingers over it. Experiment to come up with wild musical phrase! And with access to the SoundCloud audio platform*, you can publish your songs, or collaborate on ideas with people anywhere in the world from within the app!

Synth bass lines on a Roland System 100

November 2, 2011 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Background information:

I”III” plays the Roland system 100 ( 101 and 102) . Just trying out some baseline. It easily turns into EBM with these machines. Sorry for the bad audio, but we think that this is better than a lot of other stuff that is out there, and we will do better in the future. Sequencer used is the Oberkorn from Analogue Solution, recommended if you like experimental stuff. Drums from Roland TR-626. FX: Korg signal delay SD200 , and then there are some reverb coming out of Boss RX-100 .

Keep it right, keep it analogue!

Brief about the Boss RX-100:

This analog stereo reverb was available in the early 80s. Somewhat unorthodox to see that one channel has input and output jacks on the front while the other channel has input and output jacks placed at the back of the enclosure. Stereo output can be generated from a mono input signal by phase shifting one channel 180 degrees. This is controlled using the mode switch on the front panel.

C64 LIVE DEMO – SID bassline (commodore cynthcart mssiah prophet64)

October 31, 2011 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

For all you C64 fans out there:

“Live demo of one of my songs.
Bassline is played by an good old C64 equipped with Cynthcart.
Tune is called “we ain’t finished yet” and has been featured on DEAD PIXELS long play.

In 2009 I began experimenting with SID chiptune (built-in sound generator chip of Commodore 64), and Cynthcart to create a blend of original 8bit sound from the 80′s and Rock music. ”

Download FULL albums completely FREE @
http://www.lukhash.com

FB:
http://www.facebook.com/lukhashdotcom

Animoog versus the real thing

October 23, 2011 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Here’s a good bass check up from one who I believe knows what he’s talking about when it comes to comparing real Moogs to softies:

Animoog Taurus bass impression, compared with “Taurus” presets from the Moog Little Phatty, and Arturia Minimoog V. $1 vs. $1300 vs. $200.

First thing I worked on with the Moog Animoog iPad app, was programming a passable Taurus-type bass sound(two saws, octave apart, detuned slightly). There is mojo coming from both the Little Phatty and Arturia Minimoog that I couldn’t capture, but I feel like this’ll do a pretty good job in a pinch.

To program the sound, this is what I found:
1. Build off of a static saw Timbre. “StaticFatSaw1″ is good. Putting a “Sine” wave, or “OctaveSaw” in the Timbre slot next to it gives some good variation moving around on the X/Y pad.

2. The key for me to getting the vibe in the right ballpark was forcing the synth into mono operation, and using the “Detune” control to separate the saw into two separate octaves. This can be accomplished in two ways I’ve found:
-(preferable) “Unison” set to “4″, “Detune” set to approximately “8″, and ONLY use the Left audio output from the iPad(I used the “tip” side only of a stereo 1/8″ TRS to dual mono 1/4″ TS cable, coming out of the headphone jack)
- “Unison” set to “2″, and “Detune” very slightly under “10″. This’ll sound alright coming out of the iPad speaker, but is less flexible, and would be difficult to perform with.

3. all Orbit, Path, Delay settings to “0″

4. approx. fiter settings: Drive “10″, Env. “0″, Freq “5.3″, Res. “1″ – maxing out the filter “Drive” seemed to be a key to getting the right amount of “spit” in the sound with the filter wide open.

5. approx. Thick settings: Crush “0″, Drive “2.5″

6. I zeroed out all Mods, except for one, that makes the poly-pressure open up the filter freq:
- Source off, amount “0″
- Control poly-pressure, amount “+33″
- Destination: filter-freq

7. Setting the KB scale to “Chromatic” with “Mono” and “Legato” makes the on screen keyboard act as I would expect. “Cor” at “10″, “Glide” around 45%.

All three Synths recorded straight into Steinberg MR816csx. Levels adjusted slightly, no additional post processing.

How to Make Daft Punks Infamous ‘Da Funk’ Synth Sound

October 14, 2011 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

“Da Funk” was initially released as a 12 inch single in 1995 under the Soma Quality Recordings label with the B-side “Rollin’ & Scratchin’” and again in late 1996 after the band signed with Virgin Records with the B-side “Musique”, a track that later appeared in the album Musique Vol. 1 1993-2005. In an interview with Fredrik Strage for swedish magazine Pop #23 Bangalter reveal that “Da Funk” was made after listening to Westcoast G-Funk for weeks.

“It was around the time Warren G.’s “Regulate” was released and we wanted to make some sort of gangsta-rap and tried to murk our sounds as much as possible. However no one has ever compared it to hip-hop. We’ve heard that the drums sounds like Queen and The Clash, the melody is reminiscent of Giorgio Moroder, and the synthesizers sound like electro and thousand of other comparisons. No one agree with us that it sounds like hip-hop”

In September 2010 Pitchfork Media included the song at number 18 on their Top 200 Tracks of the 90s

Background information:

Buy my latest song here – http://www.beatport.com/track/vile-prankster-ryan-enzed-remix/2838739

Be sure to check out my music production forum – ryanenzed.com/forum

All I ask in return for all the free tutorials that I do for you guys is that you support /buy my new tracks when they come out on beatport – good deal right!? :D

Nice acid sound built on the classic scheme of analog synths

October 10, 2011 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Nice acid sound built on the classic scheme of analog synths: two oscillators, mixer, filter.
Try it yourself in SunVox: http://www.warmplace.ru/soft/sunvox/

Checking out TB303 modulations

July 24, 2011 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

TB303 mods / deeper cutoff & ocs. add

The Roland TB-303 Bass Line is a bass synthesizer with built-in sequencer manufactured by the Roland corporation from late 1981 to 1984 that had a defining role in the development of contemporary electronic music.

The TB-303 (short for “Transistorized Bass”) was originally marketed to guitarists for bass accompaniment while practising alone. Production lasted approximately 18 months, resulting in only 10,000 units. It was not until the mid- to late-1980s that DJs and electronic musicians in Chicago found a use for the machine in the context of the newly developing house music genre.

In the late ’80s and early 90′s, as new Acid styles emerged, the TB-303 was often overdriven, producing a harsher or acid-like sound. Examples of this technique include Charanjit Singh’s 1982 Ten Ragas to a Disco Beat,[2] Phuture’s 1987 “Acid Tracks” (sometimes known as “Acid Trax”), Hardfloor’s 1992 EP “Acperience” and Interlect 3000′s 1993 EP “Volcano”.

The well-known “acid” sound is typically produced by playing a repeating note pattern on the TB-303, while altering the filter’s cutoff frequency, resonance, and envelope modulation. The TB-303′s accent control modifies a note’s volume, filter resonance, and envelope modulation, allowing further variations in timbre. A distortion effect, either by using a guitar effects pedal or overdriving the input of an audio mixer, is commonly used to give the TB-303 a denser, noisier timbre—as the resulting sound is much richer in harmonics.

The head designer of the TB-303, Tadao Kikumoto, was also responsible for leading design of the TR-909 drum machine. In 2011, The Guardian listed the 1981 release of the TB-303 as one of the 50 key events in the history of dance music

The Three Basic Trance Basslines

February 28, 2011 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

More info below:

From “Cosmosis Bass Secrets”
http://www.cosmosis.co.uk/cms/index.p…

a workshop specifically on creating Psy trance bass sounds – contains pdfs, VSTi bass patches and instructional videos. More info here: www.cosmosis.co.uk

Part of th COSMOSIS STUDIO SERIES video workshops. For more info: http://www.cosmosis.co.uk/cms/index.p…

Buy the new Cosmosis album: Fumbling for the Funky Frequency at the Cosmosis webshop: http://cosmosis.bandcamp.com

Synth Bass Analogy

June 15, 2010 · Posted in Uncategorized · Comment 

Synth Bass Sounds

Prime Loops have released Synth Bass Analogy, a collection of 80 analogue bass sounds formatted for Kontakt, Halion, NN-XT and EXS24. Here’s what they have to say about it…

For adding pure organic soul and sonic temperament to electronic music, there’s nothing better than analogue synths. Producers dream of owning classic kit like the Roland Juno 106, Roland MKS-30, Korg Mono/Poly, Polyvox and Novation’s Super Bass Station, and engineers spend years tweaking the settings to create perfect, powerful vibrations.

Dmitry Vasilyev is one of those sonic freaks who has dedicated his musical life to discovering new sounds by pushing real hardware to the limit. As the producer of best selling Prime Loops sample packs such as “Synth Addict”, “Ambient Illusions” amongst others, he’s making his vast knowledge and huge range of equipment available to a wider audience, giving fellow producers the tools they need to get that authentic analogue vibe without a huge, expensive rack.

“Synth Bass Analogy” is Prime Loops’ latest collection of professional sample patches, delivering over 80 deep and versatile analogue bass sounds, all ready-formatted for Kontakt, Halion, NN-XT and EXS24, fine-tuned for use in deep and groovy electronica, house, ambient, garage, disco and minimal techno.

Each of these patches contains several note references to maintain integrity as you play across a wide pitch range, and Dmitry has set it all up to drift and detune just like the real thing. Everything has been captured with high-quality recording equipment and the cleanest signal path possible, to give you serious samples suitable for professional projects. And, as with all our products, this pack is triple quality-checked for drag-n-drop reliability, so there’s no interruption to your workflow.

Music lovers always appreciate the complex combination of sines, squares and saws flowing through real hardware, and analogue synths really shine when you give them a bassline, triggering deep, warm sounds that fill the room and add colour to your productions. So, whenever the mood strikes, just throw these lovingly prepared patches into your sampler, and hear your midi patterns come alive with the classic sounds of “Synth Bass Analogy”.

Pricing and Availability:
£12.95 GBP

More information:

120 Mb of free Reason Refills

November 26, 2009 · Posted in Electronic Music · Comment 

Stereoklang has uploaded another 120Mb of Reason Refills, thins time featuring everything from KORG, ARPs, Night Club beats, synth basses and more

Make sure to check’em out, they are all free to download

Here’s the link >>
:-)

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